Bradford hospitals review restraint techniques

Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Bradford Royal Infirmary Bradford Royal Infirmary

Bradford hospitals will be reviewing how staff restrain patients after new national guidelines were announced.

The Government is investing £1.2 million in staff training as part of new controls to stop the deliberate use of face-down restraint which it says is now outdated.

The guidance was prompted after a Government investigation found restraint was being used to abuse patients at Winterbournview Hospital in South Gloucestershire.

Allison Bingham, deputy director of in-patient services at Bradford District Care Trust which runs Lynfield Mount psychiatric hospital, said: “We always comply with national guidelines and will be reviewing in detail the guidance published.

“We offer a broad range of mental health services, some in the community and some in hospital settings. At times the people we care for can be very unwell and present with challenging and complex behaviours.”

Karon Snape, assistant director of non-clinical support services and security management specialist at Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust which runs Bradford Royal Infirmary and St Luke’s Hospital, said face-down restraint was rarely used by its staff.

“Patient safety is of the utmost importance at Bradford Teaching Hospitals and we predominantly use a variety of non-physical intervention techniques and strategies to help staff when they are confronted by violent and aggressive behaviour,” she said.

“Face-down restraint is seen as a last resort and is rarely used here at the Foundation Trust. It is only ever used in extreme circumstances by appropriately trained staff to protect patients and staff until the police arrive.

“In light of the Government minister’s new guidance, we will be reviewing our training to staff.”

Announcing the ban, Care and Support Minister Norman Lamb, said: “No-one should ever come to harm in the health or care system. Although it is sometimes necessary to use restraint to stop someone hurting themselves or others, the safety of patients must always come first.”

The new guidance forms part of a two-year strategy to overhaul the outdated use of restrictive interventions – such as face-down restraint, seclusion and rapid sedation – in all health and care services.

The new guidance has been developed jointly by health and care professionals and people who use services, and led by the Royal College of Nursing.

Comments (4)

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10:32am Sat 5 Apr 14

Albion. says...

While no reasonable person can condone abusing patients, restraining is sometimes essential, particularly in A&E. Or are we going to go down the do-gooders route of letting people assault public servants at will?
While no reasonable person can condone abusing patients, restraining is sometimes essential, particularly in A&E. Or are we going to go down the do-gooders route of letting people assault public servants at will? Albion.
  • Score: 1

2:32pm Sat 5 Apr 14

RollandSmoke says...

The key words here are "last resort". If the patient is getting violent and poses a threat to themselves or others then it is justified but only then otherwise what we are looking at is assault. Whilst it may be easier for staff to pounce on someone who is being loud and highly vocal this should not be accepted as by getting physically involved they increase the likelihood of injury to themselves, the patient and anyone else in the immediate vicinity. People with mental health problems are going through distress and anguish, they may be paranoid and feel that people are out to get them. If expressing their anguish sees them jumped upon and forced to the ground then I can't see this helping the situation.
The key words here are "last resort". If the patient is getting violent and poses a threat to themselves or others then it is justified but only then otherwise what we are looking at is assault. Whilst it may be easier for staff to pounce on someone who is being loud and highly vocal this should not be accepted as by getting physically involved they increase the likelihood of injury to themselves, the patient and anyone else in the immediate vicinity. People with mental health problems are going through distress and anguish, they may be paranoid and feel that people are out to get them. If expressing their anguish sees them jumped upon and forced to the ground then I can't see this helping the situation. RollandSmoke
  • Score: -5

1:09pm Sun 6 Apr 14

The Hoffster says...

RollandSmoke wrote:
The key words here are "last resort". If the patient is getting violent and poses a threat to themselves or others then it is justified but only then otherwise what we are looking at is assault. Whilst it may be easier for staff to pounce on someone who is being loud and highly vocal this should not be accepted as by getting physically involved they increase the likelihood of injury to themselves, the patient and anyone else in the immediate vicinity. People with mental health problems are going through distress and anguish, they may be paranoid and feel that people are out to get them. If expressing their anguish sees them jumped upon and forced to the ground then I can't see this helping the situation.
Good points.
[quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: The key words here are "last resort". If the patient is getting violent and poses a threat to themselves or others then it is justified but only then otherwise what we are looking at is assault. Whilst it may be easier for staff to pounce on someone who is being loud and highly vocal this should not be accepted as by getting physically involved they increase the likelihood of injury to themselves, the patient and anyone else in the immediate vicinity. People with mental health problems are going through distress and anguish, they may be paranoid and feel that people are out to get them. If expressing their anguish sees them jumped upon and forced to the ground then I can't see this helping the situation.[/p][/quote]Good points. The Hoffster
  • Score: -2

3:00pm Sat 19 Apr 14

Dr Martin says...

RollandSmoke wrote:
The key words here are "last resort". If the patient is getting violent and poses a threat to themselves or others then it is justified but only then otherwise what we are looking at is assault. Whilst it may be easier for staff to pounce on someone who is being loud and highly vocal this should not be accepted as by getting physically involved they increase the likelihood of injury to themselves, the patient and anyone else in the immediate vicinity. People with mental health problems are going through distress and anguish, they may be paranoid and feel that people are out to get them. If expressing their anguish sees them jumped upon and forced to the ground then I can't see this helping the situation.
It is justifiable to restrain a patient to give medication, again as a last resort
[quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: The key words here are "last resort". If the patient is getting violent and poses a threat to themselves or others then it is justified but only then otherwise what we are looking at is assault. Whilst it may be easier for staff to pounce on someone who is being loud and highly vocal this should not be accepted as by getting physically involved they increase the likelihood of injury to themselves, the patient and anyone else in the immediate vicinity. People with mental health problems are going through distress and anguish, they may be paranoid and feel that people are out to get them. If expressing their anguish sees them jumped upon and forced to the ground then I can't see this helping the situation.[/p][/quote]It is justifiable to restrain a patient to give medication, again as a last resort Dr Martin
  • Score: 0

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