Girlington school praised by Ofsted inspectors

Bradford Telegraph and Argus: JOY: Pupils Suleman Riaz, Arsalan Ali Nawaz, Alizah Rashid, Mohammad Antsham, Haris Khan and Ayaan Riasat at St Philips School, Girlington, with head teacher Michelle Hargreaves JOY: Pupils Suleman Riaz, Arsalan Ali Nawaz, Alizah Rashid, Mohammad Antsham, Haris Khan and Ayaan Riasat at St Philips School, Girlington, with head teacher Michelle Hargreaves

A Bradford primary school where every pupil is from an ethnic minority background, and the majority only speak English as a second language, is improving by leaps and bounds, according to Government inspectors.

St Philip’s CE Primary School in Girlington had been given the lowest possible “inadequate” rating following an Ofsted inspection in January, 2013, which cited poor teaching, pupils not having pride in their work and low expectations.

But following a surprise inspection earlier this month, the school has been moved up a grade.

Although the inspectors say it still requires improvement, head Michelle Hargreaves believes her staff and pupils have helped the school turn things around in a short period.

In the latest report, released yesterday, both leadership and pupil behaviour and safety were described as “good”.

The report says that there are many aspects the school could improve on, but praises it in several other areas.

Mrs Hargreaves, who started at the school last Easter, is praised for putting together a “strong team that has improved teaching and pupil’s achievement”.

It continues: “Pupils progress is now accelerating rapidly. They show respect and courtesy towards each other and staff and feel safe and happy at school. The vibrant learning environment excites and captures children’s imaginations.

“Since 2013 pupils standards in reading and mathematics have been improving faster than those seen nationally.

“Pupils are proud to belong to the school.”

Mrs Hargreaves, who has 13 years of teaching experience, said: “What has changed is we now have a real focus – there is a lot more emphasis on team work.

“Everyone has been massively involved in improving things, teachers, pupils parents and governors. Since the last report the school feels a lot more like a learning environment. Teachers are taking more calculated risks in the way they plan lessons. It is about letting staff and pupils take ownership of learning and making it exciting.

“The majority of pupils that start here have English as a secondary language, many speak Urdu as their first language. What we’ve done is engage parents as well as pupils.”

Ways to engage children with poor English skills include making learning more exciting – the school has its own “time machine” and set up “St Philip’s Detective Agency” as a way to teach children problem solving skills.

The school runs after school classes for parents teaching English, maths and computer skills to improve their own skills as well as allowing them to help their children.

Mrs Hargreaves added: “We always invite parents to regular discussions over what we are teaching and getting the teacher, child and parent together is really beneficial.

“The next steps are building on what we have managed to do in such a short space of time.”

The school is run by the Diocese of Bradford, and Archdeacon David Lee said: “We are delighted with Michelle, the governors and the staff in leading this improved trajectory.

“I think they have accomplished an enormous amount in a short space of time.”

Comments (19)

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10:44am Sat 29 Mar 14

spinnekop says...

Bit of good news for a change :) Keep at it folks!
Bit of good news for a change :) Keep at it folks! spinnekop
  • Score: 10

11:21am Sat 29 Mar 14

northern pig says...

Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.
Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers. northern pig
  • Score: 6

11:23am Sat 29 Mar 14

Albion. says...

northern pig wrote:
Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.
Who "learned" you?
[quote][p][bold]northern pig[/bold] wrote: Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.[/p][/quote]Who "learned" you? Albion.
  • Score: 11

11:44am Sat 29 Mar 14

northern pig says...

Albion. wrote:
northern pig wrote:
Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.
Who "learned" you?
My grandmother,who looked after me from a very early age,so my mother could return to work.When I started school at the age of five,i could read.
[quote][p][bold]Albion.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]northern pig[/bold] wrote: Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.[/p][/quote]Who "learned" you?[/p][/quote]My grandmother,who looked after me from a very early age,so my mother could return to work.When I started school at the age of five,i could read. northern pig
  • Score: 8

12:33pm Sat 29 Mar 14

The Hoffster says...

northern pig wrote:
Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.
What about those kids in the 70's and 80's whose parents couldn't speak English, yet when on to become lawyers and doctors?

How do you explain *that*?
[quote][p][bold]northern pig[/bold] wrote: Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.[/p][/quote]What about those kids in the 70's and 80's whose parents couldn't speak English, yet when on to become lawyers and doctors? How do you explain *that*? The Hoffster
  • Score: -9

12:34pm Sat 29 Mar 14

The Hoffster says...

Last post should read :

*went* (on to become....)..
Last post should read : *went* (on to become....).. The Hoffster
  • Score: -9

1:46pm Sat 29 Mar 14

northern pig says...

The Hoffster wrote:
northern pig wrote:
Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.
What about those kids in the 70's and 80's whose parents couldn't speak English, yet when on to become lawyers and doctors?

How do you explain *that*?
The teachers remit,is to teach young children , the core subjects.Not learn them to speak english before they can do so. That is the responsibility ,of the childs maternal familiy. Excuse me for stateing the obvious.
[quote][p][bold]The Hoffster[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]northern pig[/bold] wrote: Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.[/p][/quote]What about those kids in the 70's and 80's whose parents couldn't speak English, yet when on to become lawyers and doctors? How do you explain *that*?[/p][/quote]The teachers remit,is to teach young children , the core subjects.Not learn them to speak english before they can do so. That is the responsibility ,of the childs maternal familiy. Excuse me for stateing the obvious. northern pig
  • Score: 3

1:46pm Sat 29 Mar 14

northern pig says...

The Hoffster wrote:
northern pig wrote:
Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.
What about those kids in the 70's and 80's whose parents couldn't speak English, yet when on to become lawyers and doctors?

How do you explain *that*?
The teachers remit,is to teach young children , the core subjects.Not learn them to speak english before they can do so. That is the responsibility ,of the childs maternal familiy. Excuse me for stateing the obvious.
[quote][p][bold]The Hoffster[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]northern pig[/bold] wrote: Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.[/p][/quote]What about those kids in the 70's and 80's whose parents couldn't speak English, yet when on to become lawyers and doctors? How do you explain *that*?[/p][/quote]The teachers remit,is to teach young children , the core subjects.Not learn them to speak english before they can do so. That is the responsibility ,of the childs maternal familiy. Excuse me for stateing the obvious. northern pig
  • Score: -5

1:47pm Sat 29 Mar 14

The Hoffster says...

northern pig wrote:
The Hoffster wrote:
northern pig wrote:
Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.
What about those kids in the 70's and 80's whose parents couldn't speak English, yet when on to become lawyers and doctors?

How do you explain *that*?
The teachers remit,is to teach young children , the core subjects.Not learn them to speak english before they can do so. That is the responsibility ,of the childs maternal familiy. Excuse me for stateing the obvious.
Ironically I think it's yourself that needs to learn (and spell) the English language.
[quote][p][bold]northern pig[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Hoffster[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]northern pig[/bold] wrote: Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.[/p][/quote]What about those kids in the 70's and 80's whose parents couldn't speak English, yet when on to become lawyers and doctors? How do you explain *that*?[/p][/quote]The teachers remit,is to teach young children , the core subjects.Not learn them to speak english before they can do so. That is the responsibility ,of the childs maternal familiy. Excuse me for stateing the obvious.[/p][/quote]Ironically I think it's yourself that needs to learn (and spell) the English language. The Hoffster
  • Score: 5

2:05pm Sat 29 Mar 14

northern pig says...

The Hoffster wrote:
northern pig wrote:
The Hoffster wrote:
northern pig wrote:
Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.
What about those kids in the 70's and 80's whose parents couldn't speak English, yet when on to become lawyers and doctors?

How do you explain *that*?
The teachers remit,is to teach young children , the core subjects.Not learn them to speak english before they can do so. That is the responsibility ,of the childs maternal familiy. Excuse me for stateing the obvious.
Ironically I think it's yourself that needs to learn (and spell) the English language.
I am not going to win the argument with you no matter how eloquent i present my case. . As you are the Bradford member representing the loony left. I myself Favour common sense politics.with no particular persuasion.
[quote][p][bold]The Hoffster[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]northern pig[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Hoffster[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]northern pig[/bold] wrote: Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.[/p][/quote]What about those kids in the 70's and 80's whose parents couldn't speak English, yet when on to become lawyers and doctors? How do you explain *that*?[/p][/quote]The teachers remit,is to teach young children , the core subjects.Not learn them to speak english before they can do so. That is the responsibility ,of the childs maternal familiy. Excuse me for stateing the obvious.[/p][/quote]Ironically I think it's yourself that needs to learn (and spell) the English language.[/p][/quote]I am not going to win the argument with you no matter how eloquent i present my case. . As you are the Bradford member representing the loony left. I myself Favour common sense politics.with no particular persuasion. northern pig
  • Score: 6

2:48pm Sat 29 Mar 14

bradfordlad says...

my parents both of pakistani descent spoke no english after arriving here in the early 70's. Its not an excuse to be sending children to school with no english anymore as the majority of children will have at least one parent who should be speaking perfect english... the priority for my son who is at nursery is to teach him english , that will be his first and most important language .. bad parenting on most parts as they should be looking at the future of their kids
my parents both of pakistani descent spoke no english after arriving here in the early 70's. Its not an excuse to be sending children to school with no english anymore as the majority of children will have at least one parent who should be speaking perfect english... the priority for my son who is at nursery is to teach him english , that will be his first and most important language .. bad parenting on most parts as they should be looking at the future of their kids bradfordlad
  • Score: 20

3:17pm Sat 29 Mar 14

Joedavid says...

bradfordlad wrote:
my parents both of pakistani descent spoke no english after arriving here in the early 70's. Its not an excuse to be sending children to school with no english anymore as the majority of children will have at least one parent who should be speaking perfect english... the priority for my son who is at nursery is to teach him english , that will be his first and most important language .. bad parenting on most parts as they should be looking at the future of their kids
Do children hear English spoken in their homes?
[quote][p][bold]bradfordlad[/bold] wrote: my parents both of pakistani descent spoke no english after arriving here in the early 70's. Its not an excuse to be sending children to school with no english anymore as the majority of children will have at least one parent who should be speaking perfect english... the priority for my son who is at nursery is to teach him english , that will be his first and most important language .. bad parenting on most parts as they should be looking at the future of their kids[/p][/quote]Do children hear English spoken in their homes? Joedavid
  • Score: 3

4:37pm Sat 29 Mar 14

Outraged English Subject says...

Joedavid wrote:
bradfordlad wrote:
my parents both of pakistani descent spoke no english after arriving here in the early 70's. Its not an excuse to be sending children to school with no english anymore as the majority of children will have at least one parent who should be speaking perfect english... the priority for my son who is at nursery is to teach him english , that will be his first and most important language .. bad parenting on most parts as they should be looking at the future of their kids
Do children hear English spoken in their homes?
Well done to all at the school.
[quote][p][bold]Joedavid[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bradfordlad[/bold] wrote: my parents both of pakistani descent spoke no english after arriving here in the early 70's. Its not an excuse to be sending children to school with no english anymore as the majority of children will have at least one parent who should be speaking perfect english... the priority for my son who is at nursery is to teach him english , that will be his first and most important language .. bad parenting on most parts as they should be looking at the future of their kids[/p][/quote]Do children hear English spoken in their homes?[/p][/quote]Well done to all at the school. Outraged English Subject
  • Score: 7

10:29pm Sat 29 Mar 14

bd7 helper says...

Parents relying on Teachers
Bad news
Parents relying on Teachers Bad news bd7 helper
  • Score: 5

12:27pm Sun 30 Mar 14

John_clayton says...

northern pig wrote:
Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.
How good would it be if your parents 'taught' you to speak English properly. Long suffered teachers? I have been a teacher and it is a very rewarding job to help improve the English of people.
[quote][p][bold]northern pig[/bold] wrote: Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.[/p][/quote]How good would it be if your parents 'taught' you to speak English properly. Long suffered teachers? I have been a teacher and it is a very rewarding job to help improve the English of people. John_clayton
  • Score: 2

12:32pm Sun 30 Mar 14

John_clayton says...

northern pig wrote:
The Hoffster wrote:
northern pig wrote:
Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.
What about those kids in the 70's and 80's whose parents couldn't speak English, yet when on to become lawyers and doctors?

How do you explain *that*?
The teachers remit,is to teach young children , the core subjects.Not learn them to speak english before they can do so. That is the responsibility ,of the childs maternal familiy. Excuse me for stateing the obvious.
How can you learn the 'core' subject if you yourself cannot speak or write English properly?

'Learn them'? Teach them
'The teachers remit,is to teach young children ' No need for the comma
Stateing ' Remember the teacher saying, drop the 'E' when you add ''ING'?
[quote][p][bold]northern pig[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Hoffster[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]northern pig[/bold] wrote: Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.[/p][/quote]What about those kids in the 70's and 80's whose parents couldn't speak English, yet when on to become lawyers and doctors? How do you explain *that*?[/p][/quote]The teachers remit,is to teach young children , the core subjects.Not learn them to speak english before they can do so. That is the responsibility ,of the childs maternal familiy. Excuse me for stateing the obvious.[/p][/quote]How can you learn the 'core' subject if you yourself cannot speak or write English properly? 'Learn them'? Teach them 'The teachers remit,is to teach young children ' No need for the comma Stateing ' Remember the teacher saying, drop the 'E' when you add ''ING'? John_clayton
  • Score: -2

6:45pm Sun 30 Mar 14

northern pig says...

John_clayton wrote:
northern pig wrote:
The Hoffster wrote:
northern pig wrote:
Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.
What about those kids in the 70's and 80's whose parents couldn't speak English, yet when on to become lawyers and doctors?

How do you explain *that*?
The teachers remit,is to teach young children , the core subjects.Not learn them to speak english before they can do so. That is the responsibility ,of the childs maternal familiy. Excuse me for stateing the obvious.
How can you learn the 'core' subject if you yourself cannot speak or write English properly?

'Learn them'? Teach them
'The teachers remit,is to teach young children ' No need for the comma
Stateing ' Remember the teacher saying, drop the 'E' when you add ''ING'?
John, by just 'nit picking' my grammatical errors, you like a previous poster, are missing the salient point of a healthy debate by a million miles!
[quote][p][bold]John_clayton[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]northern pig[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Hoffster[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]northern pig[/bold] wrote: Just think of how much better the children would do,if their parents learned them to speak english from the day they were born.Rather than impose that responsibility,on the long suffering teachers.[/p][/quote]What about those kids in the 70's and 80's whose parents couldn't speak English, yet when on to become lawyers and doctors? How do you explain *that*?[/p][/quote]The teachers remit,is to teach young children , the core subjects.Not learn them to speak english before they can do so. That is the responsibility ,of the childs maternal familiy. Excuse me for stateing the obvious.[/p][/quote]How can you learn the 'core' subject if you yourself cannot speak or write English properly? 'Learn them'? Teach them 'The teachers remit,is to teach young children ' No need for the comma Stateing ' Remember the teacher saying, drop the 'E' when you add ''ING'?[/p][/quote]John, by just 'nit picking' my grammatical errors, you like a previous poster, are missing the salient point of a healthy debate by a million miles! northern pig
  • Score: 1

8:25pm Sun 30 Mar 14

BierleyBoy says...

Every single child is from an ethnic minority. What a dreadful indicator this is, on all counts.
Every single child is from an ethnic minority. What a dreadful indicator this is, on all counts. BierleyBoy
  • Score: 1

7:27am Mon 31 Mar 14

food_for_thought says...

Improvement is good and should be praised so congratulations to all involved with the school in question.

But...under the ridiculous framework now employed by OFSTED, and the Government's 'one size fits nobody' performance targets, this school, which works with 100% ethnic minority pupils still rates at 'Requires Improvement' - i.e. Level 3 on a scale from 1 to 4 (1 being the best). Furthermore, it is obliged to achieve the same outcomes - i.e. its pupils' English and Maths should be as good as those leaving a primary in, say, rural Berkshire where the demographic may be 100% native English speakers from supportive, well-educated, fully engaged parents.

Unless something more appropriate, such as 'value-added' (which takes into account what you achieve bearing in mind the 'raw material' you started with) becomes the principal measure of a school's worth, Bradford will remain solidly at the bottom end of the league tables.
Improvement is good and should be praised so congratulations to all involved with the school in question. But...under the ridiculous framework now employed by OFSTED, and the Government's 'one size fits nobody' performance targets, this school, which works with 100% ethnic minority pupils still rates at 'Requires Improvement' - i.e. Level 3 on a scale from 1 to 4 (1 being the best). Furthermore, it is obliged to achieve the same outcomes - i.e. its pupils' English and Maths should be as good as those leaving a primary in, say, rural Berkshire where the demographic may be 100% native English speakers from supportive, well-educated, fully engaged parents. Unless something more appropriate, such as 'value-added' (which takes into account what you achieve bearing in mind the 'raw material' you started with) becomes the principal measure of a school's worth, Bradford will remain solidly at the bottom end of the league tables. food_for_thought
  • Score: 1

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