Rise in overweight children is alarming

Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Carnegie Weight Management run a summer camp full of activities at Woodhouse Grove Primary school Carnegie Weight Management run a summer camp full of activities at Woodhouse Grove Primary school

Bradford has the highest proportion of overweight 11-year-olds in West Yorkshire, it has been revealed.

More than a third of youngsters in that age group (35 per cent) were found to be overweight or obese, according to the results of the National Child Measurement Programme.

And there is added concern at the number of those children who were found to be of a healthy weight when they were checked six years ago at the age of five.

The Bradford district’s results show that 23 per cent of pupils at reception age in 2006/7 were classed as overweight or obese, which equated to the national average.

By 2012/13, 35 per cent of the same cohort of more than 2,000 children were classed as overweight or obese by the time they had reached Year 6 – a rise of 12 per cent, and two per cent above the national rate and average figure across Yorkshire and the Humber.

Julia Burrows, public health consultant for the Council, said the increase of childhood obesity with age was “worrying” and should be a “wake-up call” to parents who needed to carefully consider their children’s diets.

And Councillor Mike Gibbons, chairman of Bradford Council’s health and social care overview committee, said the situation should ring alarm bells for both parents and the food industry.

Mrs Burrows said: “We know from experience that no-one wants to be told that their child is above a healthy weight, but after the initial shock, we hope parents begin to accept that changes are needed to give their children the best health possible. Children look to their parents and other adult family members to set an example.

“Many families are already looking for support and receive advice and support through initiatives like our weight management programmes for both adults and children and through the Good Food Advice Stall in Oastler Centre.

“We understand it’s not easy changing your whole lifestyle, but little changes can make a big difference by considering being more active, cutting out the fats and sugars and eating more fruit and vegetables.

Coun Gibbons said: “Any increase in figures such as these is a concern. This is an issue that we can’t just pass off as we have a duty of care to our children.

“I would call upon parents and families to be supportive in understanding the pressures on children, and try to explain the health problems obesity can cause in later life.

“People in the food supply industry must also look closely at any way to reduce the ever-increasing amount of ‘junk food’ consumed by our children, which is a great concern for everyone. Young people need to know the importance of a balanced and healthy diet.”

For more information on Council health services, such as its weight management programmes and the Good Food Advice Stall in Oastler Centre in Bradford, call (01274) 435387.

Comments (10)

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7:07am Fri 13 Dec 13

Albion. says...

The pushchair containing the Greggs sausage roll clutching toddler, seems to be a common feature of the High Street these days, along with people continually grazing on fat/salt laden junk.
The pushchair containing the Greggs sausage roll clutching toddler, seems to be a common feature of the High Street these days, along with people continually grazing on fat/salt laden junk. Albion.

12:22pm Fri 13 Dec 13

alive and awake says...

Child abuse from, uneducated parents. These people should be discouraged from breeding.
Child abuse from, uneducated parents. These people should be discouraged from breeding. alive and awake

1:02pm Fri 13 Dec 13

allinittogether says...

Meanwhile the so called olympic legacy we were promised that would help prevent this is kicked into the long grass by savage short sighted government cuts.
Meanwhile the so called olympic legacy we were promised that would help prevent this is kicked into the long grass by savage short sighted government cuts. allinittogether

2:42pm Fri 13 Dec 13

RollandSmoke says...

Sadly this is not a case of these children being greedy and eating too much it is a case of financial necessity meaning that their parents are buying cheap foods that are high in fat. Healthy eating costs money which is something that Bradfordians, whether working or not it seems, do not have.
Sadly this is not a case of these children being greedy and eating too much it is a case of financial necessity meaning that their parents are buying cheap foods that are high in fat. Healthy eating costs money which is something that Bradfordians, whether working or not it seems, do not have. RollandSmoke

3:11pm Fri 13 Dec 13

Prisoner Cell Block A says...

RollandSmoke wrote:
Sadly this is not a case of these children being greedy and eating too much it is a case of financial necessity meaning that their parents are buying cheap foods that are high in fat. Healthy eating costs money which is something that Bradfordians, whether working or not it seems, do not have.
Bag of carrots, 75p, 6 tomatoes, 75p, 2 onions, 30p, 2 cloves of garlic, 12p, finger chillies, 2p each, pan of water boiling, strainer and masher or food processor.

Extremely tasty soup, full of vital nutrients and vitamins approximately 8 portions, under £2 including the gas bill to heat the water. I make it every Sunday afternoon and bring it to work all week and have a portion or two on an evening.

I have maintained a weight of between 10st and 11st all my life and am now approaching 50 and smack bang in the middle at 10.5st.

What Bradfordians do have is a penchant for not cooking, not having concern over their or their children's diets and too many fast food outlets where it is easy to grab fried chicken and chips for under £2 per portion. That has no nutritional value and is seen as sufficient to feed a child/family.

My soup could feed 8 for under £2.
[quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: Sadly this is not a case of these children being greedy and eating too much it is a case of financial necessity meaning that their parents are buying cheap foods that are high in fat. Healthy eating costs money which is something that Bradfordians, whether working or not it seems, do not have.[/p][/quote]Bag of carrots, 75p, 6 tomatoes, 75p, 2 onions, 30p, 2 cloves of garlic, 12p, finger chillies, 2p each, pan of water boiling, strainer and masher or food processor. Extremely tasty soup, full of vital nutrients and vitamins approximately 8 portions, under £2 including the gas bill to heat the water. I make it every Sunday afternoon and bring it to work all week and have a portion or two on an evening. I have maintained a weight of between 10st and 11st all my life and am now approaching 50 and smack bang in the middle at 10.5st. What Bradfordians do have is a penchant for not cooking, not having concern over their or their children's diets and too many fast food outlets where it is easy to grab fried chicken and chips for under £2 per portion. That has no nutritional value and is seen as sufficient to feed a child/family. My soup could feed 8 for under £2. Prisoner Cell Block A

3:47pm Fri 13 Dec 13

RollandSmoke says...

Prisoner Cell Block A wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
Sadly this is not a case of these children being greedy and eating too much it is a case of financial necessity meaning that their parents are buying cheap foods that are high in fat. Healthy eating costs money which is something that Bradfordians, whether working or not it seems, do not have.
Bag of carrots, 75p, 6 tomatoes, 75p, 2 onions, 30p, 2 cloves of garlic, 12p, finger chillies, 2p each, pan of water boiling, strainer and masher or food processor.

Extremely tasty soup, full of vital nutrients and vitamins approximately 8 portions, under £2 including the gas bill to heat the water. I make it every Sunday afternoon and bring it to work all week and have a portion or two on an evening.

I have maintained a weight of between 10st and 11st all my life and am now approaching 50 and smack bang in the middle at 10.5st.

What Bradfordians do have is a penchant for not cooking, not having concern over their or their children's diets and too many fast food outlets where it is easy to grab fried chicken and chips for under £2 per portion. That has no nutritional value and is seen as sufficient to feed a child/family.

My soup could feed 8 for under £2.
Why not just put your children into care where the government will happily spend over £100k each making sure that the kids are getting something more substancial than soup inside them? We are not a third world country and I find the suggestion that people should be living like we are offensive.
[quote][p][bold]Prisoner Cell Block A[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: Sadly this is not a case of these children being greedy and eating too much it is a case of financial necessity meaning that their parents are buying cheap foods that are high in fat. Healthy eating costs money which is something that Bradfordians, whether working or not it seems, do not have.[/p][/quote]Bag of carrots, 75p, 6 tomatoes, 75p, 2 onions, 30p, 2 cloves of garlic, 12p, finger chillies, 2p each, pan of water boiling, strainer and masher or food processor. Extremely tasty soup, full of vital nutrients and vitamins approximately 8 portions, under £2 including the gas bill to heat the water. I make it every Sunday afternoon and bring it to work all week and have a portion or two on an evening. I have maintained a weight of between 10st and 11st all my life and am now approaching 50 and smack bang in the middle at 10.5st. What Bradfordians do have is a penchant for not cooking, not having concern over their or their children's diets and too many fast food outlets where it is easy to grab fried chicken and chips for under £2 per portion. That has no nutritional value and is seen as sufficient to feed a child/family. My soup could feed 8 for under £2.[/p][/quote]Why not just put your children into care where the government will happily spend over £100k each making sure that the kids are getting something more substancial than soup inside them? We are not a third world country and I find the suggestion that people should be living like we are offensive. RollandSmoke

4:37pm Fri 13 Dec 13

Prisoner Cell Block A says...

RollandSmoke wrote:
Prisoner Cell Block A wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
Sadly this is not a case of these children being greedy and eating too much it is a case of financial necessity meaning that their parents are buying cheap foods that are high in fat. Healthy eating costs money which is something that Bradfordians, whether working or not it seems, do not have.
Bag of carrots, 75p, 6 tomatoes, 75p, 2 onions, 30p, 2 cloves of garlic, 12p, finger chillies, 2p each, pan of water boiling, strainer and masher or food processor.

Extremely tasty soup, full of vital nutrients and vitamins approximately 8 portions, under £2 including the gas bill to heat the water. I make it every Sunday afternoon and bring it to work all week and have a portion or two on an evening.

I have maintained a weight of between 10st and 11st all my life and am now approaching 50 and smack bang in the middle at 10.5st.

What Bradfordians do have is a penchant for not cooking, not having concern over their or their children's diets and too many fast food outlets where it is easy to grab fried chicken and chips for under £2 per portion. That has no nutritional value and is seen as sufficient to feed a child/family.

My soup could feed 8 for under £2.
Why not just put your children into care where the government will happily spend over £100k each making sure that the kids are getting something more substancial than soup inside them? We are not a third world country and I find the suggestion that people should be living like we are offensive.
I have a well paid job with grown up children all in work thank you.. One being a chef at a top restaurant.

That was a suggestion on how a cheap and nourishing, also very, very tasty meal can be made if people weren't so lazy and went for the easy option.

At some point people have to take responsibility for themselves and their families, I have done so adequately all my life, as did my parents.

You are fast becoming laughable Roly, whilst some of the things you say do make sense I do find you are quite a blame monger and it is never 'your' or 'the poor' or 'the uneducated' 's fault.

I grew up in an inner city back-to-back Victorian house, I attended 3 schools all in the BD3 area and now only live in BD2, I am neither priviledged nor posh, I didn't over achieve at school but I have worked my socks off since leaving, not ever having signed on or claimed a benefit in my life. I have received child benefit for the above mentioned children.
At one point I worked my day job from 6am until 4pm and then went and helped my father who is a plumber until 7 or 8 every evening for years.

That earned me a fall back trade if I ever need it, although at 47 I am probably not going to have the muscle nor stamina required to do more than the odd repair job or drain clearing.

BTW, try the soup recipe, it really is gorgeous and not the gruel you are hoping I was suggesting.
[quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Prisoner Cell Block A[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: Sadly this is not a case of these children being greedy and eating too much it is a case of financial necessity meaning that their parents are buying cheap foods that are high in fat. Healthy eating costs money which is something that Bradfordians, whether working or not it seems, do not have.[/p][/quote]Bag of carrots, 75p, 6 tomatoes, 75p, 2 onions, 30p, 2 cloves of garlic, 12p, finger chillies, 2p each, pan of water boiling, strainer and masher or food processor. Extremely tasty soup, full of vital nutrients and vitamins approximately 8 portions, under £2 including the gas bill to heat the water. I make it every Sunday afternoon and bring it to work all week and have a portion or two on an evening. I have maintained a weight of between 10st and 11st all my life and am now approaching 50 and smack bang in the middle at 10.5st. What Bradfordians do have is a penchant for not cooking, not having concern over their or their children's diets and too many fast food outlets where it is easy to grab fried chicken and chips for under £2 per portion. That has no nutritional value and is seen as sufficient to feed a child/family. My soup could feed 8 for under £2.[/p][/quote]Why not just put your children into care where the government will happily spend over £100k each making sure that the kids are getting something more substancial than soup inside them? We are not a third world country and I find the suggestion that people should be living like we are offensive.[/p][/quote]I have a well paid job with grown up children all in work thank you.. One being a chef at a top restaurant. That was a suggestion on how a cheap and nourishing, also very, very tasty meal can be made if people weren't so lazy and went for the easy option. At some point people have to take responsibility for themselves and their families, I have done so adequately all my life, as did my parents. You are fast becoming laughable Roly, whilst some of the things you say do make sense I do find you are quite a blame monger and it is never 'your' or 'the poor' or 'the uneducated' 's fault. I grew up in an inner city back-to-back Victorian house, I attended 3 schools all in the BD3 area and now only live in BD2, I am neither priviledged nor posh, I didn't over achieve at school but I have worked my socks off since leaving, not ever having signed on or claimed a benefit in my life. I have received child benefit for the above mentioned children. At one point I worked my day job from 6am until 4pm and then went and helped my father who is a plumber until 7 or 8 every evening for years. That earned me a fall back trade if I ever need it, although at 47 I am probably not going to have the muscle nor stamina required to do more than the odd repair job or drain clearing. BTW, try the soup recipe, it really is gorgeous and not the gruel you are hoping I was suggesting. Prisoner Cell Block A

5:39pm Fri 13 Dec 13

RollandSmoke says...

So I should blame the poor for being poor despite knowing full well that there is a jobs crisis and that the poor are in no position to create jobs? I should blame the uneducated for being uneducated despite knowing that education standards are slipping and even with the best schools in the world there will always be some who lack the ability to learn? You have been lucky overall and I do not begrudge you your good fortune. Personally I worked many years in many different jobs before ill health made me unable to continue, should I be blamed for this? There is a media driven finger pointing and stigmatisation excersize taking place which I find distasteful (unlike your soup) which serves only to deflect attention away from those with the responsibility to address these problems and onto those who lack the means whether financial or educational to change their circumstances. The nasty tone of some of the comments from those fortunate enough not to be in the same position disgusts me. I see through past the headlines to the ideological messages being pushed and quite frankly I find it deeply disturbing and want it to stop. I worry for the future if these sort of attacks become acceptable.
So I should blame the poor for being poor despite knowing full well that there is a jobs crisis and that the poor are in no position to create jobs? I should blame the uneducated for being uneducated despite knowing that education standards are slipping and even with the best schools in the world there will always be some who lack the ability to learn? You have been lucky overall and I do not begrudge you your good fortune. Personally I worked many years in many different jobs before ill health made me unable to continue, should I be blamed for this? There is a media driven finger pointing and stigmatisation excersize taking place which I find distasteful (unlike your soup) which serves only to deflect attention away from those with the responsibility to address these problems and onto those who lack the means whether financial or educational to change their circumstances. The nasty tone of some of the comments from those fortunate enough not to be in the same position disgusts me. I see through past the headlines to the ideological messages being pushed and quite frankly I find it deeply disturbing and want it to stop. I worry for the future if these sort of attacks become acceptable. RollandSmoke

7:12pm Fri 13 Dec 13

Freddy Elliot says...

Prisoner Cell Block A wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
Sadly this is not a case of these children being greedy and eating too much it is a case of financial necessity meaning that their parents are buying cheap foods that are high in fat. Healthy eating costs money which is something that Bradfordians, whether working or not it seems, do not have.
Bag of carrots, 75p, 6 tomatoes, 75p, 2 onions, 30p, 2 cloves of garlic, 12p, finger chillies, 2p each, pan of water boiling, strainer and masher or food processor.

Extremely tasty soup, full of vital nutrients and vitamins approximately 8 portions, under £2 including the gas bill to heat the water. I make it every Sunday afternoon and bring it to work all week and have a portion or two on an evening.

I have maintained a weight of between 10st and 11st all my life and am now approaching 50 and smack bang in the middle at 10.5st.

What Bradfordians do have is a penchant for not cooking, not having concern over their or their children's diets and too many fast food outlets where it is easy to grab fried chicken and chips for under £2 per portion. That has no nutritional value and is seen as sufficient to feed a child/family.

My soup could feed 8 for under £2.
Ditto Prisoner Cell Block A, like the mother on the way to nursey pushing the push chair with baby sucking on a Twix while toddlers 'Levi' and 'Henley' in tow eating a bag of Nik Naks each.
A young chappie I worked with once was always skint at the end of each week so all he could afford to buy for the last day or two was packets of Mini Cheddars from a rip off vending machine in the canteen, 70 pence a packet rings a bell. Rest of his diet was cheese burgers with 'free delivery', they were £6 a time as well!!
[quote][p][bold]Prisoner Cell Block A[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: Sadly this is not a case of these children being greedy and eating too much it is a case of financial necessity meaning that their parents are buying cheap foods that are high in fat. Healthy eating costs money which is something that Bradfordians, whether working or not it seems, do not have.[/p][/quote]Bag of carrots, 75p, 6 tomatoes, 75p, 2 onions, 30p, 2 cloves of garlic, 12p, finger chillies, 2p each, pan of water boiling, strainer and masher or food processor. Extremely tasty soup, full of vital nutrients and vitamins approximately 8 portions, under £2 including the gas bill to heat the water. I make it every Sunday afternoon and bring it to work all week and have a portion or two on an evening. I have maintained a weight of between 10st and 11st all my life and am now approaching 50 and smack bang in the middle at 10.5st. What Bradfordians do have is a penchant for not cooking, not having concern over their or their children's diets and too many fast food outlets where it is easy to grab fried chicken and chips for under £2 per portion. That has no nutritional value and is seen as sufficient to feed a child/family. My soup could feed 8 for under £2.[/p][/quote]Ditto Prisoner Cell Block A, like the mother on the way to nursey pushing the push chair with baby sucking on a Twix while toddlers 'Levi' and 'Henley' in tow eating a bag of Nik Naks each. A young chappie I worked with once was always skint at the end of each week so all he could afford to buy for the last day or two was packets of Mini Cheddars from a rip off vending machine in the canteen, 70 pence a packet rings a bell. Rest of his diet was cheese burgers with 'free delivery', they were £6 a time as well!! Freddy Elliot

9:13pm Fri 13 Dec 13

Prisoner Cell Block A says...

RollandSmoke wrote:
So I should blame the poor for being poor despite knowing full well that there is a jobs crisis and that the poor are in no position to create jobs? I should blame the uneducated for being uneducated despite knowing that education standards are slipping and even with the best schools in the world there will always be some who lack the ability to learn? You have been lucky overall and I do not begrudge you your good fortune. Personally I worked many years in many different jobs before ill health made me unable to continue, should I be blamed for this? There is a media driven finger pointing and stigmatisation excersize taking place which I find distasteful (unlike your soup) which serves only to deflect attention away from those with the responsibility to address these problems and onto those who lack the means whether financial or educational to change their circumstances. The nasty tone of some of the comments from those fortunate enough not to be in the same position disgusts me. I see through past the headlines to the ideological messages being pushed and quite frankly I find it deeply disturbing and want it to stop. I worry for the future if these sort of attacks become acceptable.
No, I don't really mean 'blame' the poor etc, but I come from humble background, am still in the same echelon but don't call me lucky, I grafted and instilled those values into my sons. They have experienced unemployment, I don't give handouts so they soon found employment by printing off CVs and walking from place to place and handing them in, the chef especially.

I do agree there is stigmatisation but there is also a woe is me culture and everyone in this country does start out 'more or less' equal. Especially as far as education and the ability to gain employment, there are obviously exceptions but you will also admit there are counter-exceptions.

The topic at hand re obese children is not a case of fat laden cheap food, it is lack of drive and ambition coupled with given and learned values.
[quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: So I should blame the poor for being poor despite knowing full well that there is a jobs crisis and that the poor are in no position to create jobs? I should blame the uneducated for being uneducated despite knowing that education standards are slipping and even with the best schools in the world there will always be some who lack the ability to learn? You have been lucky overall and I do not begrudge you your good fortune. Personally I worked many years in many different jobs before ill health made me unable to continue, should I be blamed for this? There is a media driven finger pointing and stigmatisation excersize taking place which I find distasteful (unlike your soup) which serves only to deflect attention away from those with the responsibility to address these problems and onto those who lack the means whether financial or educational to change their circumstances. The nasty tone of some of the comments from those fortunate enough not to be in the same position disgusts me. I see through past the headlines to the ideological messages being pushed and quite frankly I find it deeply disturbing and want it to stop. I worry for the future if these sort of attacks become acceptable.[/p][/quote]No, I don't really mean 'blame' the poor etc, but I come from humble background, am still in the same echelon but don't call me lucky, I grafted and instilled those values into my sons. They have experienced unemployment, I don't give handouts so they soon found employment by printing off CVs and walking from place to place and handing them in, the chef especially. I do agree there is stigmatisation but there is also a woe is me culture and everyone in this country does start out 'more or less' equal. Especially as far as education and the ability to gain employment, there are obviously exceptions but you will also admit there are counter-exceptions. The topic at hand re obese children is not a case of fat laden cheap food, it is lack of drive and ambition coupled with given and learned values. Prisoner Cell Block A

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