Bradford councillors to ask why some windmills are allowed and others are not

Bradford Telegraph and Argus: A wind turbine A wind turbine

Bradford Council has turned down half of the applications to build wind turbines submitted to it in the past 20 years, a report has revealed.

On Tuesday, Bradford Council’s Environment Scrutiny Committee will be given an update on how the Council decides where turbines can be built.

They will hear how despite wind energy having the potential to produce nine per cent of the district’s electricity, many proposals were viewed as causing too much visual harm to the surrounding landscape.

The committee felt it was not obvious why some were approved and some refused.

Bradford uses roughly 1,964 gigawatt hours of electricity a year and a recent study by engineering company Aecom found there was the capacity to generate 183GWh, nine per cent of this, through large wind farms. There are no such wind farms in the district – most turbines are on farms and rural sites.

Current planning policy says that although Council officers have to give weight to environmental benefits of turbine applications, they must not let such developments harm the surrounding areas.

The report, by planning strategy manager Andrew Marshall, says: “When located in the Green Belt, elements of many renewable energy projects will comprise inappropriate development. In such cases developers will need to demonstrate very special circumstances if projects are to proceed.”

Since 1992 the Council has received 101 applications for turbines, with 51 approved and 50 refused. Of those refused, seven have gone to appeal, with inspectors dismissing four.

There are five applications waiting for a decision: at Black Pots Farm and Green Acres, Fishbeck Lane, both in Silsden, and three in Denholme – Keelham Hall Farm, Shay Farm and Ashbrook Hall Farm.

There are also five appeals in progress: at Eldwick, Oxenhope, Harden and Silsden.

Committee chairman Councillor Martin Love (Green, Shipley) said: “We seem to allow turbines in some parts of the district but not others. I will be asking some questions at the meeting, like when does a couple of turbines become a wind farm? There are a lot of grey areas on what is allowed and what isn’t.”

The committee meets at City Hall at 5.30pm on Tuesday.

Comments (5)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

11:10am Thu 9 May 13

Thee Voice of Reason says...

Basically, if a councillor can see one from his/her house it is refused otherwise it's approved.
Basically, if a councillor can see one from his/her house it is refused otherwise it's approved. Thee Voice of Reason

11:35am Thu 9 May 13

scottie dog says...

Depending on your view point these fixtures are either an eyesore or an asset, for myself covering the countryside with these is to be approached with caution as the jury is still out on whether they are an efficient form of energy supply.
Depending on your view point these fixtures are either an eyesore or an asset, for myself covering the countryside with these is to be approached with caution as the jury is still out on whether they are an efficient form of energy supply. scottie dog

12:03pm Thu 9 May 13

collos25 says...

The people making decisions do not know how these things work believe all the lies that are told about them ,there is not a windfarm in the UK that produces usable cheap power why because there is no intelligent grid or means of storing the power.They do not tell you they need power from the grid to start that the power they produce is not storeable so if its not required its just wasted.Those that do get passed locally come with fat brown envelopes which always helps in decision making.
The people making decisions do not know how these things work believe all the lies that are told about them ,there is not a windfarm in the UK that produces usable cheap power why because there is no intelligent grid or means of storing the power.They do not tell you they need power from the grid to start that the power they produce is not storeable so if its not required its just wasted.Those that do get passed locally come with fat brown envelopes which always helps in decision making. collos25

12:09pm Thu 9 May 13

johnhem says...

just how many do you need to make a windfarm? 1 looks odd, 2look out of place and 10 upwards would ruin the view/countryside. if they are so good why are we subsidising them, why can't they pay their own way?
just how many do you need to make a windfarm? 1 looks odd, 2look out of place and 10 upwards would ruin the view/countryside. if they are so good why are we subsidising them, why can't they pay their own way? johnhem

7:26pm Thu 9 May 13

Doc savage says...

What I find odd about these so called energy efficient wind farms is certain facts about wind farms seem to be ignored. For example did you know big turbines often incorporate rechargeable batteries or ultracapacitors to power their own electrical systems. When those get depleted, the power must come from the grid. This power goes into running equipment such as yaw mechanisms that keep the blades turned into the wind; blade-pitch controls that meter the spinning rotor; aircraft lights and data-collection electronics; oil heaters, pumps, and coolers for the multi-ton gearbox; and hydraulic brakes for locking blades down in high winds and don't forget heating mechanisms to keep the blades free from ice and dehumidifiers are needed and here is the killer for me when there is no wind the wind farms draw power from the grid to keep the blades and mechanism in continuing working order. It's interesting to note no wind-farm operator or a wind-turbine maker willing to discuss these lost costs they simply pass on the cost to us the consumers. Wind farms green? I think not we must not be sheep and believe in what is green propaganda.
What I find odd about these so called energy efficient wind farms is certain facts about wind farms seem to be ignored. For example did you know big turbines often incorporate rechargeable batteries or ultracapacitors to power their own electrical systems. When those get depleted, the power must come from the grid. This power goes into running equipment such as yaw mechanisms that keep the blades turned into the wind; blade-pitch controls that meter the spinning rotor; aircraft lights and data-collection electronics; oil heaters, pumps, and coolers for the multi-ton gearbox; and hydraulic brakes for locking blades down in high winds and don't forget heating mechanisms to keep the blades free from ice and dehumidifiers are needed and here is the killer for me when there is no wind the wind farms draw power from the grid to keep the blades and mechanism in continuing working order. It's interesting to note no wind-farm operator or a wind-turbine maker willing to discuss these lost costs they simply pass on the cost to us the consumers. Wind farms green? I think not we must not be sheep and believe in what is green propaganda. Doc savage

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree