THOUSANDS of A-Level students will soon find out if they’ve landed their dream uni placement – but what are the chances of getting a job afterwards?

With university tuition fees at an all-time high, more students are looking ahead to what their job prospects look like after they’ve graduated.

But what courses give you the highest and lowest chances of getting a job – and how much do they pay?

Loans company Satsuma.co.uk has crunched government data to come up with a list of the best and worst degree courses for future employment, and what salaries these graduates can expect to earn up to 10 years later.

Bradford Telegraph and Argus:
All pics - Getty


Anyone going on to study Medicine & Dentistry can breathe a sigh of relief – not only do they stand they highest chance of being in a job a year after graduation, but they will be earning an average of £47,100 after five years.

Closely following behind in second place is Nursing, with 95.2% of graduates either entering the workplace or staying on for extra study within one year of completing their course.

But it’s not such great news for Languages, linguistics and classics students, who are the least likely to be employed after getting their qualification.

THE DEGREES WITH THE BEST CHANCE OF A JOB

THE DEGREES WITH THE LOWEST CHANCES OF GETTING A JOB

What about salary?

Perhaps unsurprisingly, those studying medicine and dentistry can expect the highest salary after they have graduated.

On average, these graduates pull in £36,600 a year after finishing uni, £47,100 five years later and £53,300 after a decade.

SCROLL DOWN TO SEE 5 BEST AND WORST

Bradford Telegraph and Argus:

This is followed by Economics graduates, who can look forward to a salary of £49,800 on average 10 years after leaving education.

The outlook is more bleak for those studying Creative Arts and Design, who can only expect to earn £14,900 after their course – less than half the amount of those finishing medical school.

And the art graduates are looking at a salary of only £23,300 ten years later, which means they won’t have even started to pay back their loans, with the current threshold set at £25,725.

Five years after leaving university the average salary for these students is just £20,500 per annum – that’s £7,100 less than the current UK average salary of £27,600.

Bradford Telegraph and Argus:

Agriculture graduates earn the second-lowest after five years, pulling in just £21,700. Humanities and Liberal Arts students earn the third-lowest five years after completing their course on £21,800.

TOP 5 HIGHEST PAYING DEGREES

TOP 5 LOWEST PAYING DEGREES