Health chiefs failing sufferers of diabetes

Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Reporter Hannah Postles with her medication Reporter Hannah Postles with her medication

The district’s primary care trust is failing to provide around two-thirds of adult diabetic patients with the basic care services recommended by the Department of Health.

A report published yesterday by the National Audit Office (NAO) revealed treatment for diabetes patients is a postcode lottery with a massive variation in quality of care from one region to another.

In some regions, only six per cent of sufferers received the recommended levels of care compared to 69 per cent in the highest-achieving primary care trusts (PCTs).

In Bradford and Airedale just 30 to 39 per cent of diabetes patients received the nine basic care processes which reduce the risk of diabetes-related complications, such as blindness, amputation or kidney disease.

More than 28,000 people in the district have diabetes, with Type 2 diabetes accounting for around 90 per of all diagnoses.

The nine tests monitor a patient’s urine, blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol, blood, eyes, feet, glucose levels and smoking habits.

Amyas Morse, head of the National Audit Office, said: “The Department of Health has failed to deliver diabetes care to the standard it set out as long ago as 2001. This has resulted in people with diabetes developing avoidable complications, in a high number of preventable deaths and in increased costs for the NHS.

“The expected 23 per cent increase by 2020 in the number of people in England with diabetes will have a major impact on NHS resources unless the efficiency and effectiveness of existing services are substantially improved.”

A spokesman for NHS Airedale, Bradford and Leeds said: “We are working with GPs to ensure all patients with diabetes in Bradford and Airedale are monitored.

“In 2010 we completed a redesign of diabetes services across the district which has led to improved services and an expansion of community-based clinics, providing better access for patients, particularly those from disadvantaged groups.

“The new diabetic eye screening service has been designed around the needs of patients to help increase the number of people with diabetes who access this important annual check.

“Community clinic numbers have increased from six to 16 and we have also looked at areas of low uptake to help provide an even more accessible service with mobile clinics.

“We have a strong focus on diabetes prevention and education, particularly in areas of Bradford where prevalence of type 2 diabetes is high, to increase early detection and uptake of services and improve self-management.”

Telegraph & Argus reporter Hannah Postles, who has recently been diagnosed with diabetes, here tells how important the right medical support has been for her.

I was diagnosed with type one diabetes five months ago.

Since then, I’ve had my blood glucose measured and blood pressure taken and been taught to count carbohydrates to calculate how much insulin I need to give myself. I’ve also had regular consultations and phone calls from my diabetes specialist nurse, seen a dietician and had a physical examination by my consultant.

Without the care I’ve received so far, I would have struggled to adapt to my new lifestyle and stay healthy.

Diabetes isn’t like other conditions where you’re told to take pills a set number of times a day. When I was diagnosed, I was given a bag full of insulin pens and needles and put in control of my own health. That is a lot to cope with, which is why it’s so important people receive the nine basic care processes to make sure they manage their condition properly.

People with diabetes can live normal lives and if problems are picked up early the risk of serious complications can be prevented.

Comments (10)

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8:27am Thu 24 May 12

Joedavid says...

The NHS Dept in charge of Diabetes Care in Bradford comes over to patients as badly run, might not be but requires to be looked at seems to duplicate what GP does in some things.
The NHS Dept in charge of Diabetes Care in Bradford comes over to patients as badly run, might not be but requires to be looked at seems to duplicate what GP does in some things. Joedavid

9:38am Thu 24 May 12

shipley pride says...

I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 14 years ago, I have seen chiropodist, had retinal screening, hba1c done, cholesterol checked and am booked to see a dietician on Friday, I asked to see one Tuesday. Managing diabetes is about self care, my diabetes team are fantastic, the care I get is second to none.
I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 14 years ago, I have seen chiropodist, had retinal screening, hba1c done, cholesterol checked and am booked to see a dietician on Friday, I asked to see one Tuesday. Managing diabetes is about self care, my diabetes team are fantastic, the care I get is second to none. shipley pride

10:23am Thu 24 May 12

DM says...

I have had Type 1 diabetes for 49 years and whilst there have been some problems I can only say that the BRI have been smashing and a great help, with care and follow up care available (despite my denials about my condition!) and a brilliant diabetic nurse. Gill has been there as back up. I would recommend the insulin pump which has been a great help. Diabetes care is expensive and I often feel guilt about how much I am costing the NHS so all the more reason to offer praise where it is due.
I have had Type 1 diabetes for 49 years and whilst there have been some problems I can only say that the BRI have been smashing and a great help, with care and follow up care available (despite my denials about my condition!) and a brilliant diabetic nurse. Gill has been there as back up. I would recommend the insulin pump which has been a great help. Diabetes care is expensive and I often feel guilt about how much I am costing the NHS so all the more reason to offer praise where it is due. DM

10:37am Thu 24 May 12

Albion. says...

shipley pride wrote:
I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 14 years ago, I have seen chiropodist, had retinal screening, hba1c done, cholesterol checked and am booked to see a dietician on Friday, I asked to see one Tuesday. Managing diabetes is about self care, my diabetes team are fantastic, the care I get is second to none.
Me too!
[quote][p][bold]shipley pride[/bold] wrote: I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes 14 years ago, I have seen chiropodist, had retinal screening, hba1c done, cholesterol checked and am booked to see a dietician on Friday, I asked to see one Tuesday. Managing diabetes is about self care, my diabetes team are fantastic, the care I get is second to none.[/p][/quote]Me too! Albion.

10:47am Thu 24 May 12

Joedavid says...

Glad you others think the service is good, and I do too what I not sure about is why both my GP surgery and the NHS at Douglas Mill both duplicating the care.
Does not seem efficient, would like to have GP surgery only.
Glad you others think the service is good, and I do too what I not sure about is why both my GP surgery and the NHS at Douglas Mill both duplicating the care. Does not seem efficient, would like to have GP surgery only. Joedavid

12:19pm Thu 24 May 12

loobylou1604 says...

I would have to agree that the care for type 1 diabetes is brilliant at the BRI. My daughter has been diabetic since 13 and is 33 this year and without them she would not be here. They arrange her with up to date equipment - her blood test now take less than 5 seconds, she has an insulin pump which regulates her intake, she has regular appointments with eye specialists and had a cataract op. She also suffered with a related condition called gastroparesis which results in frequent bouts of extreme sickness & led to 17 periods of hospitalisation each of around a week over 12 months. They have now secured her a gastic pacer which although is a very expensive op has virtually cured her. The nurses (Sandra & Gill) are brilliant, they understand her completely, which isnt always easym and are always on hand to help with any problem and they work hand in hand with her GP to ensure the very best of care .
I would have to agree that the care for type 1 diabetes is brilliant at the BRI. My daughter has been diabetic since 13 and is 33 this year and without them she would not be here. They arrange her with up to date equipment - her blood test now take less than 5 seconds, she has an insulin pump which regulates her intake, she has regular appointments with eye specialists and had a cataract op. She also suffered with a related condition called gastroparesis which results in frequent bouts of extreme sickness & led to 17 periods of hospitalisation each of around a week over 12 months. They have now secured her a gastic pacer which although is a very expensive op has virtually cured her. The nurses (Sandra & Gill) are brilliant, they understand her completely, which isnt always easym and are always on hand to help with any problem and they work hand in hand with her GP to ensure the very best of care . loobylou1604

12:42pm Thu 24 May 12

Yorkshire Lass says...

loobylou1604 wrote:
I would have to agree that the care for type 1 diabetes is brilliant at the BRI. My daughter has been diabetic since 13 and is 33 this year and without them she would not be here. They arrange her with up to date equipment - her blood test now take less than 5 seconds, she has an insulin pump which regulates her intake, she has regular appointments with eye specialists and had a cataract op. She also suffered with a related condition called gastroparesis which results in frequent bouts of extreme sickness & led to 17 periods of hospitalisation each of around a week over 12 months. They have now secured her a gastic pacer which although is a very expensive op has virtually cured her. The nurses (Sandra & Gill) are brilliant, they understand her completely, which isnt always easym and are always on hand to help with any problem and they work hand in hand with her GP to ensure the very best of care .
I agree, having been a diabetic for many, many years, in the care of the BRI, I can only say that their attention to the patients is second to none. The support is brilliant so I am wondering if maybe the new increase in diabetics (Type 2 mostly) heed the care needed and stick to their diets and medication. Its no good being massively overweight and eating junk food as eventually the pancreas and other organs suffer. If the medication subscribed is not taken regularly then expect all of the other serious side effects to kick in associated with "out of control diabetes". Maybe the health authorities should be spending more money educating people about the illnesses that could occur if the diabetes runs out of control. Certainly not a bedtime story. However if the diabetes is kept under control, most patients can lead a normal life.
[quote][p][bold]loobylou1604[/bold] wrote: I would have to agree that the care for type 1 diabetes is brilliant at the BRI. My daughter has been diabetic since 13 and is 33 this year and without them she would not be here. They arrange her with up to date equipment - her blood test now take less than 5 seconds, she has an insulin pump which regulates her intake, she has regular appointments with eye specialists and had a cataract op. She also suffered with a related condition called gastroparesis which results in frequent bouts of extreme sickness & led to 17 periods of hospitalisation each of around a week over 12 months. They have now secured her a gastic pacer which although is a very expensive op has virtually cured her. The nurses (Sandra & Gill) are brilliant, they understand her completely, which isnt always easym and are always on hand to help with any problem and they work hand in hand with her GP to ensure the very best of care .[/p][/quote]I agree, having been a diabetic for many, many years, in the care of the BRI, I can only say that their attention to the patients is second to none. The support is brilliant so I am wondering if maybe the new increase in diabetics (Type 2 mostly) heed the care needed and stick to their diets and medication. Its no good being massively overweight and eating junk food as eventually the pancreas and other organs suffer. If the medication subscribed is not taken regularly then expect all of the other serious side effects to kick in associated with "out of control diabetes". Maybe the health authorities should be spending more money educating people about the illnesses that could occur if the diabetes runs out of control. Certainly not a bedtime story. However if the diabetes is kept under control, most patients can lead a normal life. Yorkshire Lass

6:42pm Thu 24 May 12

Willard says...

I have 4 close friends and family members with diabetes. A 19 year old and a 70 year old both type 1 and carb count, excercise and inject up to 5 times per day. Both have normal BP and are normal weight. I also know 2 overweight type 2 who eat the wrong stuff and never excercise. Why do we always talk about type 1 and type 2 diabetics as being the same condition, they clearly are not.
I have 4 close friends and family members with diabetes. A 19 year old and a 70 year old both type 1 and carb count, excercise and inject up to 5 times per day. Both have normal BP and are normal weight. I also know 2 overweight type 2 who eat the wrong stuff and never excercise. Why do we always talk about type 1 and type 2 diabetics as being the same condition, they clearly are not. Willard

6:51pm Thu 24 May 12

Albion. says...

Willard wrote:
I have 4 close friends and family members with diabetes. A 19 year old and a 70 year old both type 1 and carb count, excercise and inject up to 5 times per day. Both have normal BP and are normal weight. I also know 2 overweight type 2 who eat the wrong stuff and never excercise. Why do we always talk about type 1 and type 2 diabetics as being the same condition, they clearly are not.
I am type two, have never been fat, workout every morning and walk 6-8 miles every morning, whatever the weather. My blood glucose level is well under control and I eat a decent diet. My doctor told me that my condition was inherited. Because I had it for many years without knowing, it has done a great deal of damage to me (particularly to the eyes), so everyone is an individual and you can't assume that they are all self neglecting, obese people.
[quote][p][bold]Willard[/bold] wrote: I have 4 close friends and family members with diabetes. A 19 year old and a 70 year old both type 1 and carb count, excercise and inject up to 5 times per day. Both have normal BP and are normal weight. I also know 2 overweight type 2 who eat the wrong stuff and never excercise. Why do we always talk about type 1 and type 2 diabetics as being the same condition, they clearly are not.[/p][/quote]I am type two, have never been fat, workout every morning and walk 6-8 miles every morning, whatever the weather. My blood glucose level is well under control and I eat a decent diet. My doctor told me that my condition was inherited. Because I had it for many years without knowing, it has done a great deal of damage to me (particularly to the eyes), so everyone is an individual and you can't assume that they are all self neglecting, obese people. Albion.

7:22pm Thu 24 May 12

Willard says...

Albion. wrote:
Willard wrote:
I have 4 close friends and family members with diabetes. A 19 year old and a 70 year old both type 1 and carb count, excercise and inject up to 5 times per day. Both have normal BP and are normal weight. I also know 2 overweight type 2 who eat the wrong stuff and never excercise. Why do we always talk about type 1 and type 2 diabetics as being the same condition, they clearly are not.
I am type two, have never been fat, workout every morning and walk 6-8 miles every morning, whatever the weather. My blood glucose level is well under control and I eat a decent diet. My doctor told me that my condition was inherited. Because I had it for many years without knowing, it has done a great deal of damage to me (particularly to the eyes), so everyone is an individual and you can't assume that they are all self neglecting, obese people.
My apologies, I make the cardinal error of gross generalisation and the exceptions do exist in numbers. Go well and stay well Albion
[quote][p][bold]Albion.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Willard[/bold] wrote: I have 4 close friends and family members with diabetes. A 19 year old and a 70 year old both type 1 and carb count, excercise and inject up to 5 times per day. Both have normal BP and are normal weight. I also know 2 overweight type 2 who eat the wrong stuff and never excercise. Why do we always talk about type 1 and type 2 diabetics as being the same condition, they clearly are not.[/p][/quote]I am type two, have never been fat, workout every morning and walk 6-8 miles every morning, whatever the weather. My blood glucose level is well under control and I eat a decent diet. My doctor told me that my condition was inherited. Because I had it for many years without knowing, it has done a great deal of damage to me (particularly to the eyes), so everyone is an individual and you can't assume that they are all self neglecting, obese people.[/p][/quote]My apologies, I make the cardinal error of gross generalisation and the exceptions do exist in numbers. Go well and stay well Albion Willard

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