Help honour Bradford's WW1 heroes with new memorial to the Pals

HEROES: Soldiers in the Second Battalion Bradford Pal

APPEAL: From left, Bradford WW1 Group members, Gerald Beevers, Geoff Barker, Tricia Platts, Bradford Council leader David Green, Councillor John Ruding and Telegraph & Argus Editor, Perry Austin- Clarke at the Bradford PALS memorial to launch the appe

APPEAL: From left, Bradford WW1 Group members, Gerald Beevers, Geoff Barker, Tricia Platts, Bradford Council leader David Green, Councillor John Ruding and Telegraph & Argus Editor, Perry Austin- Clarke at the Bradford PALS memorial to launch the appe

First published in News
Last updated
Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Photograph of the Author by , T&A Reporter

THE appeal to raise funds for a memorial to the Bradford Pals who fought and died at the Battle of the Somme, as revealed in yesterday’s Telegraph & Argus, is well under way.

The Honour the Pals appeal has seen Bradford Council, the Telegraph & Argus, supported by the Bradford World War One Group, team up to remembercommemorate the brave soldiers who took part in the first day of the conflict on July 1, 1916.

It is hoped the memorial will be unveiled in a ceremony in France to mark the centenary of the start of the Battle of the Somme on July 1, 2016. 

And now anyone who backs the appeal can also leave messages of dedication to the soldiers who fell during the First World War, including at the Somme, by filling out the special section of the Honour The Pals Appeal coupon which is printed on the right of this story. 

The messages, to be of a maximum of 50 words, will be uploaded in the Bradford At War section of telegraphandargus.co.uk/WW1.

MORE ON BRADFORD'S WAR HEROES AND CITY'S CENTENARY COMMEMORATIONS

The Pals were recruited through the Citizens’ Army League and 1,069 men had enlisted within a month of war breaking out in August 1914, bringing the first Battalion – the Bradford Pals – into being. 

Their road to the Somme saw the soldiers camp in Skipton, Ripon, Fovant in Wiltshire and then Egypt. In February 1916, the Pals were shipped to Marseille and taken by train to northern France.

The Bradford World War One Group believes 1,394 men ‘went over the top’ on July 1,1916 and 1,017 of these soldiers were either killed or injured in that one, dreadful day. The Battle of the Somme, fought on both sides of the River Somme, ended on November 18, 1916, on both sides of the River Somme in France.

Men from the Bradford district who fought with other battalions and regiments, such as the Territorials and the 10th Battalion West Yorks, will also be commemorated by the new memorial.

Tricia Platts, secretary of the Bradford World War One group, said a memorial is crucial to educate the next generations from Bradford going on school trips to the French battlefields.
She said: “It is hugely important, I think, for visitors making trips, especially to the Somme.

“More and more school groups are going and there is nowhere for the school groups from Bradford to go to focus their pupils’ attention”.

Geoff Barker, group chairman, said: “Nearly everyone in Bradford has got some relative, now going back to great-grandfathers and great-uncles, who were involved in that campaign.”

ENTER THE CHILDREN'S WORLD WAR ONE POETRY COMPETITION

The Pals’ bravery is already marked with a plaque in Bradford city centre and now a call has been made for a permanent reminder in the French battlefields where many of them lost their lives. 

The Bradford World War One group placed its own plaque to the Pals in the French village of Herbuterne in 2002. 

DONATE TO THE HONOUR THE PALS APPEAL

To donate to the appeal, send a cheque, payable to 'Honour the Pals Appeal', with your name and address and contact details to:

Honour the Pals Appeal
Telegraph & Argus
Hall Ings
Bradford
BD1 1JR

Alternatively, hand it in at the Telegraph & Argus office, City Hall, in Bradford or Keighley Town Hall.

DOWNLOAD AN HONOUR THE PALS APPEAL DONATION FORM TO SEND A MESSAGE OF DEDICATION

Comments (5)

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9:21am Tue 5 Aug 14

pcmanners says...

It is a great pity that the Government was prevented from privatising the War Graves Commission. They would have been able to raise the capital for additional monuments by charging an entrance fee to their cemeteries. Hopefully this privatisation will happen after the next election.

The state has no place acting as an undertaker or monumental mason, that job should be left to private enterprise.
It is a great pity that the Government was prevented from privatising the War Graves Commission. They would have been able to raise the capital for additional monuments by charging an entrance fee to their cemeteries. Hopefully this privatisation will happen after the next election. The state has no place acting as an undertaker or monumental mason, that job should be left to private enterprise. pcmanners
  • Score: -16

9:34am Tue 5 Aug 14

bcfc1903 says...

Will be donating to the Bradford Pal memorial fund, as I'm sure will many other Bradfordians. Great idea and certainly a memorial, when built, that we as an extended family would like to visit.
Will be donating to the Bradford Pal memorial fund, as I'm sure will many other Bradfordians. Great idea and certainly a memorial, when built, that we as an extended family would like to visit. bcfc1903
  • Score: 5

7:36pm Tue 5 Aug 14

chell911 says...

Hi for anyone intrested pls follow George green on Twitter it is a life of a world war one soldier starting today and going through all his time in the war his great grandchild has found all the history including origional papers for asking him tO go and serve and where. This is a special opportunity to capture everything the family have found out x
Hi for anyone intrested pls follow George green on Twitter it is a life of a world war one soldier starting today and going through all his time in the war his great grandchild has found all the history including origional papers for asking him tO go and serve and where. This is a special opportunity to capture everything the family have found out x chell911
  • Score: 1

8:11am Thu 7 Aug 14

theoutsider says...

The idea that you signed up to fight alongside your 'Pals" actually fuelled the fervour for service and helped Kitchener recruit his army ensuring most men did their duty. Today the same principal is applied when we send troops to into far flung places. Many of our soldiers would if the could speak out against serving in Iraq, Afghanistan etc..I mean what would motivate you to walk out of a protected military compound and stalk streets and open ground hissing with jihadist locals?. But they do and the only reason they do is founded in the 'Pals Principal' you cover my back and I'll cover yours. Even if sheer commonsense tells you not to walk forward and endanget yourself; you back your mates and go forward with them. Its a basic military principal and kind of conditions serving soldiers to getting on with the job. Even if they themselves question what they are doing they can always bring it back to covering for each other and standing together. Listen to present day soldiers talking.Despite the losses, the maimings and futility of fighting in some dusty landscape; no one breaks rank and says "look this is a waste and unwinnable". Its always we re making the world a better place; restoring democracy and freedom. But the basic reality is; soldiers are; as they were 100 years ago 'trying to get through it' and survive. Backing your 'Pals' has always been the best reason to carry on regardless of the futality of war.
The idea that you signed up to fight alongside your 'Pals" actually fuelled the fervour for service and helped Kitchener recruit his army ensuring most men did their duty. Today the same principal is applied when we send troops to into far flung places. Many of our soldiers would if the could speak out against serving in Iraq, Afghanistan etc..I mean what would motivate you to walk out of a protected military compound and stalk streets and open ground hissing with jihadist locals?. But they do and the only reason they do is founded in the 'Pals Principal' you cover my back and I'll cover yours. Even if sheer commonsense tells you not to walk forward and endanget yourself; you back your mates and go forward with them. Its a basic military principal and kind of conditions serving soldiers to getting on with the job. Even if they themselves question what they are doing they can always bring it back to covering for each other and standing together. Listen to present day soldiers talking.Despite the losses, the maimings and futility of fighting in some dusty landscape; no one breaks rank and says "look this is a waste and unwinnable". Its always we re making the world a better place; restoring democracy and freedom. But the basic reality is; soldiers are; as they were 100 years ago 'trying to get through it' and survive. Backing your 'Pals' has always been the best reason to carry on regardless of the futality of war. theoutsider
  • Score: 0

8:04am Fri 8 Aug 14

Disco66 says...

At this time I remember " Uncle Tom ." Thomas Rushworth, like so many more, lied about his age and went to war. He survived and at the end of his career retired as Det. Chief Superintendent. C.I.D. City of Bradford Police. R.I.P. Uncle Tom
At this time I remember " Uncle Tom ." Thomas Rushworth, like so many more, lied about his age and went to war. He survived and at the end of his career retired as Det. Chief Superintendent. C.I.D. City of Bradford Police. R.I.P. Uncle Tom Disco66
  • Score: 0

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