Protesters aim to put a stop to Ilkley Moor grouse shooting

Protesters aim to put a stop to Ilkley Moor grouse shooting

Protesters aim to put a stop to Ilkley Moor grouse shooting

First published in News

Campaigners are targeting Bradford Council in an attempt to halt grouse shooting on the publicly-owned Ilkley Moor.

A coalition of anti-bloodsports campaigners, called Ban Bloodsports on Ilkley Moor (BBIM) says it already has 500 signatures on a petition calling on the Council to end the shoots – and says it may take “lawful direct action” to obstruct shoots.

The group and its supporters have also posted comments on Bradford Council’s social media sites.

The Council granted a lease to Bingley Moor Partnership in 2008 to hold shoots, in a deal which sees the Partnership provide a gamekeeper and work with the Council on the management of the moor.

The move came following the fire of 2006 which badly damaged large areas of the moor. The Council has since secured a Higher Level Stewardship agreement with Natural England, which brought more funding to help manage the moor.

Spokesman for BBIM, Luke Steele, said: “The shooting of grouse for entertainment on Ilkley Moor is barbaric. These marvellous birds are shot out of the sky for pleasure.”

Bradford Council said it let the grouse shooting rights in 2008 on a ten-year agreement, and a review was undertaken by its Environment and Waste Management Overview and Scrutiny Committee last July.

A Council spokesman said: “This concluded that the agreement would continue to its end date in 2018, subject to a number of conditions which were included in the review report. This remains the Council’s position".

“The Committee also asked in July 2013 for a progress monitoring report about the conditions of Ilkley Moor Sporting Rights Deed to be presented to members in 12 months time.”

Comments (6)

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9:20am Thu 29 May 14

pcmanners says...

Land like this should not be in public ownership. It should be sold off and the proceeds used to reduce the levels of Socialist debt.

If people have paid the Council for the privilege they should be allowed to kill as many birds as they want. It is not for socialist riff-raff and bleeding-heart animal lovers to stop them.
Land like this should not be in public ownership. It should be sold off and the proceeds used to reduce the levels of Socialist debt. If people have paid the Council for the privilege they should be allowed to kill as many birds as they want. It is not for socialist riff-raff and bleeding-heart animal lovers to stop them. pcmanners
  • Score: 10

10:58am Thu 29 May 14

Grumpygirl says...

Killing animals for fun is wrong. This kind of activity should be banned.

It is typical of the hypocrisy of the our so-called Socialist Council that they let the rich needlessly slaughter innocent birds on Council land.
Killing animals for fun is wrong. This kind of activity should be banned. It is typical of the hypocrisy of the our so-called Socialist Council that they let the rich needlessly slaughter innocent birds on Council land. Grumpygirl
  • Score: 8

5:41pm Thu 29 May 14

Albion. says...

Grumpygirl wrote:
Killing animals for fun is wrong. This kind of activity should be banned.

It is typical of the hypocrisy of the our so-called Socialist Council that they let the rich needlessly slaughter innocent birds on Council land.
When it has been stopped in the past, the associated maintenance didn't take place and the moor became a boggy mess. Almost all the birds are reared for the shoot as the native ones were wiped out by disease. Better to have organised shoots than to drive them underground, at least it brings much needed funds to the council.
[quote][p][bold]Grumpygirl[/bold] wrote: Killing animals for fun is wrong. This kind of activity should be banned. It is typical of the hypocrisy of the our so-called Socialist Council that they let the rich needlessly slaughter innocent birds on Council land.[/p][/quote]When it has been stopped in the past, the associated maintenance didn't take place and the moor became a boggy mess. Almost all the birds are reared for the shoot as the native ones were wiped out by disease. Better to have organised shoots than to drive them underground, at least it brings much needed funds to the council. Albion.
  • Score: 2

9:51pm Thu 29 May 14

imi-r6 says...

The only reason these birds exist is because they are reared for sport. Left to there own devices they would disappear within 4 or 5 years. dead from predation,disease and starvation. The moors look like they do to make it attractive to the grouse. Again, left alone it will turn to a boggy mess or scruffy scrub-land inhabited by predators. like much of our countryside it is not natural but is so because of commercial interests.
The only reason these birds exist is because they are reared for sport. Left to there own devices they would disappear within 4 or 5 years. dead from predation,disease and starvation. The moors look like they do to make it attractive to the grouse. Again, left alone it will turn to a boggy mess or scruffy scrub-land inhabited by predators. like much of our countryside it is not natural but is so because of commercial interests. imi-r6
  • Score: 1

9:18am Fri 30 May 14

A650 says...

The moor is an artificial landscape that is managed primarily to promote a habitat for Red Grouse. If shooting is stopped then it’s not in anyone’s interest financially to keep the landscape and manage it as it is. I’m not a supporter of blood sports but I think a bit of moderation is needed here. I say allow the shooting but ensure that all shot birds are collected and not wasted, at present the majority are left to rot. That’s wrong. Second properly ensure that keepers aren’t setting poison traps for predators. It’s obvious it happens yet it’s so unnecessary. Keepers are often in tied houses and have to do the bidding of the person owning the rights and put pressure on them to break the law. That’s wrong. You can have a grouse moor and still allow other animals to exist alongside them making it an enjoyable place for us all.

At the moment the moor is a mono-culture. It’s striking how few predators are up there in comparison with other areas that are less “managed”.
The moor is an artificial landscape that is managed primarily to promote a habitat for Red Grouse. If shooting is stopped then it’s not in anyone’s interest financially to keep the landscape and manage it as it is. I’m not a supporter of blood sports but I think a bit of moderation is needed here. I say allow the shooting but ensure that all shot birds are collected and not wasted, at present the majority are left to rot. That’s wrong. Second properly ensure that keepers aren’t setting poison traps for predators. It’s obvious it happens yet it’s so unnecessary. Keepers are often in tied houses and have to do the bidding of the person owning the rights and put pressure on them to break the law. That’s wrong. You can have a grouse moor and still allow other animals to exist alongside them making it an enjoyable place for us all. At the moment the moor is a mono-culture. It’s striking how few predators are up there in comparison with other areas that are less “managed”. A650
  • Score: -10

6:01pm Sat 31 May 14

rubberbandman5 says...

Poor old grumpygirl knows a great deal about very little. Out voted and left in a ditch with her knickers wrapped around her ankles.
Poor old grumpygirl knows a great deal about very little. Out voted and left in a ditch with her knickers wrapped around her ankles. rubberbandman5
  • Score: -1

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