Prescription drug addicts 'are adept' at fooling GPs

Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Dr Alun George Dr Alun George

Most of the people Dr Alun George treats at Bradford’s Unity Centre are seeking recovery-based treatment for class A drug use – but he also sees people who are dependent on prescription drugs.

Dr George is Clinical Lead at Unity, part of Bradford drug treatment charity Bridge. Unity provides recovery-based treatment for drug users committed to reducing their substitute medication.

He says prescription drug dependency has risen in recent years, largely because the internet has increased accessibility. The internet also passes knowledge around – people familiar with drugs know how to mix substances, and share information.

When it comes to obtaining medication from a GP, which the patient intends to sell or pass on, they lie about symptoms or a condition. “They’ll say they need more pain relief, or something for anxiety or to help them sleep. Addicts are manipulative, they know how to lie to up their medication,” said Karen, a former prescription drug addict, in recovery at Bridge, who spoke to the Telegraph & Argus.

As a prison doctor, Dr George has seen newsletters sharing information on how to “fool” a GP into prescribing medications. He says that while GPs can spot signs of this, when it comes to prescribing medicine they are under pressure from increased demands on time.

“They have a difficult job, they’re under pressure to reach a mutual agreement with their patient. This is particularly hard with a patient with a substance misuse,” he said. “If you have a dependency you have an irrational drive that transcends everything else. Whatever is prescribed is seen as a potential high. People with a history of substance misuse are incredibly resourceful. And often patients are being coerced by manipulative partners into getting them medication.

“GPs don’t have time to step back and make the assessments we make. At Unity, if we can sense something is wrong we step back and ask ‘why?’ GPs have 10 minutes. When it comes to repeat prescriptions, some people slip under the radar.

“There is concern among GPs about the abuse of prescription drugs, and we talk to them about drugs like pregabalin and say ‘these are the risks’. Pregabalin, which we’re very concerned about, is being pushed as a drug for anxiety and nerve pain. We haven't seen a shift away from this yet, but we're collecting reports on deaths associated with its use, and we’re hoping the warnings will soon be louder.

“While we talk to GPs about prescription drug problems some react immediately, some are slower. And drug companies constantly try to get us to prescribe their drug.

“Younger GPs tend to be more on the ball because their training covers substance misuse.”

Dr George says prescription drugs are generally taken as an enhancement to Class A and B drugs, rather than a substitute. Among the most commonly used, and dangerous, are diazepam, which users can quickly become dependent on; tramadol, which raises serotonin levels, benzodiazepine, known as ‘benzos’, used for treating conditions such as anxiety, insomnia, agitation and seizures, and highly addictive, and over-the-counter antihistamines such as Nytol and Piriton.

“Some tricyclic anti-depressant drugs are also being sold on the streets, and anti-sickness drugs,” said Dr George. “A lot of patients with drug problems take anti-depressants as they think these will help their mood. They won’t – only stopping drugs will help their mood. The anti-depressant just adds to their chances of getting serotonin syndrome (overheating) if they take other unknown drugs – and that can kill.”

He adds: “Alcohol often goes hand-in-hand with drugs. Usually when alcohol is added to the mix, it results in death.”

Dr George said prescription drugs taken illegally are often not prescribed in this country. “They’re prescribed in other countries which can have looser controls on things such as etizolam, similar to alprazolam. We don’t prescribe it in the UK but we come across it a lot in packages from clients who have bought it from dealers or ordered on the net,” he says. “Also, dealers will often cut heroin with prescription drugs, so people don't know they’re taking it.

“While we do what we can to counteract these things – and all we can do is educate the public and other health professionals – it’s very difficult to control these drugs. If people want them. They’re easy to get hold of.”

While some medication is obtained illegally, for £2 or £3 on the streets, some can be bought over the counter at chemists. Some painkillers and sleep aids can become addictive.

“It’s a pseudo-addiction,” said Dr George. “When you stop taking codeine the pain comes back, so you continue taking it. When it starts to take priority over other areas of life, such as family or work, it becomes a dependency problem.”

Those in recovery at Unity are given prescriptions as part of a withdrawal process to reduce and eventually cease taking medication. Some service users take medication such as methadone at chemists, under supervision, but are not allowed to take it if intoxicated.

Although it’s taken under supervision, some addicts manage to get their medication out onto the streets. “We know of people regurgitating methadone for others, or holding pills in the mouth and passing them on before they dissolve,” said Dr George. “People will find ways of cheating the system.”

Some users are prescribed a week’s worth of medication, to take daily at home. The doctor makes a judgement taking into account circumstances such as where they live, whether there are children living there, and where medication is kept at home.

“If they’re sleeping rough it’s not safe to take a week’s dose. We also look at mental health issues and suicide risk,” said Dr George. “We carry out random tests and can tell by behaviour if someone is “topping up” with other medication. When it comes to taking medication home, we tell them if it’s taken all at once they won’t get anymore, and they could die. There’s trust involved, but most people do take it properly.”

He adds: “There’s no reason why someone ends up a drug addict. It’s more prevalent in deprived areas, and it can run in families, but it’s non discriminatory. I see people from all races, sexualities, jobs, walks of life, intellects. Triggers, good and bad, can set off drug use.

“We say to people ‘it’s not your fault, but you’re in treatment now and it is your responsibility’.”

Treatment emphasis is on support

At the Unity Recovery Centre Dr George’s role as a prescriber is “fairly minimal”, something he makes clear to service users.
When reducing medication, people may experience anxiety, pain issues or mental health problems, tackled with psycho-social intervention. Unity offers groups and activities designed to help people achieve and maintain a drug-free lifestyle. Specialist support helps them acquire skills to reduce medication and deal with underlying issues, and there is an emphasis on recovery programmes such as support groups led by former addicts.
“Recovery services have changed shift over recent years. Heroin use is very much on the decrease, and contributing to this is the recovery-oriented approach to treatment. We want to spread this approach to all drugs,” said Dr George. “People who use drugs become very isolated, and there’s a ritual with drug-taking that is hard to break away from. We encourage mutual aid – there is good evidence that it works.
“At Unity we sometimes see people specifically for prescription drug dependence, and we take the same approach – changing their way of thinking and how they use the drugs. The focus needs to be treatment in a non-judgemental way. When people come to us, we won’t judge them on what they’re taking or where they got it from. It’s what they want to do next.
“The focus is also on harm reduction; letting people know the risks they are taking and letting them know there is good help, non-judgmental help out there.”
He adds: “When it works well here it's because of the team work. Everyone involved in a patient’s care all talk to each other with the patient's best interests at heart.
“There is good support in Bradford, including residential help and Narcotics Anonymous groups around the district.”

  • For more about the Bridge project call (01274) 723863 or visit bridge-bradford.org.uk

Comments (15)

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2:27pm Wed 7 May 14

RollandSmoke says...

Whilst it may be true that addicts are adept at fooling GPs so are the Pharmaceutical companies who push Doctors to prescribe the drugs that get people addicted in the first place. In the majority of cases of depression and anxiety these drugs simply do not work as intended and can prolong or worsen episodes of depression with side effects that lead to suicidal thoughts and self harm. St Johns wart is quite effective with depression but if you want it you are on your own as regards sourcing and funding it so patients will get the prescriptions rather than fork out for the extra cost. As regards pain relief many get relief from cannabis which is non addictive, impossible to overdose on and illegal because it presents competition for the big Pharmaceutical giants who know that on a level playing field they could not compete. If you are taking SSRIs you should read this... http://www.theguardi
an.com/commentisfree
/2014/apr/30/psychia
tric-drugs-harm-than
-good-ssri-antidepre
ssants-benzodiazepin
es
Whilst it may be true that addicts are adept at fooling GPs so are the Pharmaceutical companies who push Doctors to prescribe the drugs that get people addicted in the first place. In the majority of cases of depression and anxiety these drugs simply do not work as intended and can prolong or worsen episodes of depression with side effects that lead to suicidal thoughts and self harm. St Johns wart is quite effective with depression but if you want it you are on your own as regards sourcing and funding it so patients will get the prescriptions rather than fork out for the extra cost. As regards pain relief many get relief from cannabis which is non addictive, impossible to overdose on and illegal because it presents competition for the big Pharmaceutical giants who know that on a level playing field they could not compete. If you are taking SSRIs you should read this... http://www.theguardi an.com/commentisfree /2014/apr/30/psychia tric-drugs-harm-than -good-ssri-antidepre ssants-benzodiazepin es RollandSmoke
  • Score: -2

3:14pm Wed 7 May 14

RollandSmoke says...

Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use.

Dependency and Withdrawal
According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits.
http://www.cannabis-
med.org/english/pati
ents-use.htm
Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use. Dependency and Withdrawal According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits. http://www.cannabis- med.org/english/pati ents-use.htm RollandSmoke
  • Score: -4

6:30pm Wed 7 May 14

alive and awake says...

RollandSmoke wrote:
Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use.

Dependency and Withdrawal
According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits.
http://www.cannabis-

med.org/english/pati

ents-use.htm
Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly
[quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use. Dependency and Withdrawal According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits. http://www.cannabis- med.org/english/pati ents-use.htm[/p][/quote]Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly alive and awake
  • Score: 3

6:39pm Wed 7 May 14

RollandSmoke says...

alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use.

Dependency and Withdrawal
According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits.
http://www.cannabis-


med.org/english/pati


ents-use.htm
Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly
There are no physical withdrawal symptoms. Sure people may crave it because they think it's nice just as some may crave chocolate. Is chocolate addictive? I've not had a smoke for quite some time, I can take it or leave it, would I like some?, hell yes, does that make me an addict? no.
[quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use. Dependency and Withdrawal According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits. http://www.cannabis- med.org/english/pati ents-use.htm[/p][/quote]Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly[/p][/quote]There are no physical withdrawal symptoms. Sure people may crave it because they think it's nice just as some may crave chocolate. Is chocolate addictive? I've not had a smoke for quite some time, I can take it or leave it, would I like some?, hell yes, does that make me an addict? no. RollandSmoke
  • Score: -3

7:54pm Wed 7 May 14

alive and awake says...

RollandSmoke wrote:
alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use.

Dependency and Withdrawal
According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits.
http://www.cannabis-



med.org/english/pati



ents-use.htm
Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly
There are no physical withdrawal symptoms. Sure people may crave it because they think it's nice just as some may crave chocolate. Is chocolate addictive? I've not had a smoke for quite some time, I can take it or leave it, would I like some?, hell yes, does that make me an addict? no.
most withdrawal symptoms of anything are mental. shame you have abstained from something you really enjoy, must be for a financial reasons, I would legalise it by the way. I might get your vote ne day yet.
[quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use. Dependency and Withdrawal According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits. http://www.cannabis- med.org/english/pati ents-use.htm[/p][/quote]Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly[/p][/quote]There are no physical withdrawal symptoms. Sure people may crave it because they think it's nice just as some may crave chocolate. Is chocolate addictive? I've not had a smoke for quite some time, I can take it or leave it, would I like some?, hell yes, does that make me an addict? no.[/p][/quote]most withdrawal symptoms of anything are mental. shame you have abstained from something you really enjoy, must be for a financial reasons, I would legalise it by the way. I might get your vote ne day yet. alive and awake
  • Score: 1

8:10pm Wed 7 May 14

RollandSmoke says...

alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use.

Dependency and Withdrawal
According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits.
http://www.cannabis-




med.org/english/pati




ents-use.htm
Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly
There are no physical withdrawal symptoms. Sure people may crave it because they think it's nice just as some may crave chocolate. Is chocolate addictive? I've not had a smoke for quite some time, I can take it or leave it, would I like some?, hell yes, does that make me an addict? no.
most withdrawal symptoms of anything are mental. shame you have abstained from something you really enjoy, must be for a financial reasons, I would legalise it by the way. I might get your vote ne day yet.
Oh and which party would you be standing for? As regards no-one wanting to bother me on this thread could it be that the right wing have finally worked out that when you've got nothing to say it's best to say nothing or is it just that there's an election coming up and they don't want me to make them look any more stupid than they already do? That said this is now the most commented on story of the day. It's good to see some acknowledgement that addicts can just as easily be grandparents and ill people who get their drug of choice from their doctor and never deal with the dealers. If cannabis can be used to tackle alcoholism I believe the country would be better off for it if we did.
[quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use. Dependency and Withdrawal According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits. http://www.cannabis- med.org/english/pati ents-use.htm[/p][/quote]Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly[/p][/quote]There are no physical withdrawal symptoms. Sure people may crave it because they think it's nice just as some may crave chocolate. Is chocolate addictive? I've not had a smoke for quite some time, I can take it or leave it, would I like some?, hell yes, does that make me an addict? no.[/p][/quote]most withdrawal symptoms of anything are mental. shame you have abstained from something you really enjoy, must be for a financial reasons, I would legalise it by the way. I might get your vote ne day yet.[/p][/quote]Oh and which party would you be standing for? As regards no-one wanting to bother me on this thread could it be that the right wing have finally worked out that when you've got nothing to say it's best to say nothing or is it just that there's an election coming up and they don't want me to make them look any more stupid than they already do? That said this is now the most commented on story of the day. It's good to see some acknowledgement that addicts can just as easily be grandparents and ill people who get their drug of choice from their doctor and never deal with the dealers. If cannabis can be used to tackle alcoholism I believe the country would be better off for it if we did. RollandSmoke
  • Score: -2

8:22pm Wed 7 May 14

alive and awake says...

RollandSmoke wrote:
alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use.

Dependency and Withdrawal
According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits.
http://www.cannabis-





med.org/english/pati





ents-use.htm
Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly
There are no physical withdrawal symptoms. Sure people may crave it because they think it's nice just as some may crave chocolate. Is chocolate addictive? I've not had a smoke for quite some time, I can take it or leave it, would I like some?, hell yes, does that make me an addict? no.
most withdrawal symptoms of anything are mental. shame you have abstained from something you really enjoy, must be for a financial reasons, I would legalise it by the way. I might get your vote ne day yet.
Oh and which party would you be standing for? As regards no-one wanting to bother me on this thread could it be that the right wing have finally worked out that when you've got nothing to say it's best to say nothing or is it just that there's an election coming up and they don't want me to make them look any more stupid than they already do? That said this is now the most commented on story of the day. It's good to see some acknowledgement that addicts can just as easily be grandparents and ill people who get their drug of choice from their doctor and never deal with the dealers. If cannabis can be used to tackle alcoholism I believe the country would be better off for it if we did.
only if we tax it ad add VAT.
[quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use. Dependency and Withdrawal According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits. http://www.cannabis- med.org/english/pati ents-use.htm[/p][/quote]Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly[/p][/quote]There are no physical withdrawal symptoms. Sure people may crave it because they think it's nice just as some may crave chocolate. Is chocolate addictive? I've not had a smoke for quite some time, I can take it or leave it, would I like some?, hell yes, does that make me an addict? no.[/p][/quote]most withdrawal symptoms of anything are mental. shame you have abstained from something you really enjoy, must be for a financial reasons, I would legalise it by the way. I might get your vote ne day yet.[/p][/quote]Oh and which party would you be standing for? As regards no-one wanting to bother me on this thread could it be that the right wing have finally worked out that when you've got nothing to say it's best to say nothing or is it just that there's an election coming up and they don't want me to make them look any more stupid than they already do? That said this is now the most commented on story of the day. It's good to see some acknowledgement that addicts can just as easily be grandparents and ill people who get their drug of choice from their doctor and never deal with the dealers. If cannabis can be used to tackle alcoholism I believe the country would be better off for it if we did.[/p][/quote]only if we tax it ad add VAT. alive and awake
  • Score: 1

8:44pm Wed 7 May 14

RollandSmoke says...

alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use.

Dependency and Withdrawal
According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits.
http://www.cannabis-






med.org/english/pati






ents-use.htm
Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly
There are no physical withdrawal symptoms. Sure people may crave it because they think it's nice just as some may crave chocolate. Is chocolate addictive? I've not had a smoke for quite some time, I can take it or leave it, would I like some?, hell yes, does that make me an addict? no.
most withdrawal symptoms of anything are mental. shame you have abstained from something you really enjoy, must be for a financial reasons, I would legalise it by the way. I might get your vote ne day yet.
Oh and which party would you be standing for? As regards no-one wanting to bother me on this thread could it be that the right wing have finally worked out that when you've got nothing to say it's best to say nothing or is it just that there's an election coming up and they don't want me to make them look any more stupid than they already do? That said this is now the most commented on story of the day. It's good to see some acknowledgement that addicts can just as easily be grandparents and ill people who get their drug of choice from their doctor and never deal with the dealers. If cannabis can be used to tackle alcoholism I believe the country would be better off for it if we did.
only if we tax it ad add VAT.
Whilst that is what campaign groups such as Clear are campaigning for it is important that the cost benefits of a regulated system of production are not lost by over taxing or the dealers will still be able to compete and getting them off the streets is more important than the tax revenue it may generate. I believe that people should have the right to grow their own if they wish but the number of plants would need to be limited to ensure that it was for their own personal use, perhaps through a licensing system.
http://www.clear-uk.
org/
[quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use. Dependency and Withdrawal According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits. http://www.cannabis- med.org/english/pati ents-use.htm[/p][/quote]Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly[/p][/quote]There are no physical withdrawal symptoms. Sure people may crave it because they think it's nice just as some may crave chocolate. Is chocolate addictive? I've not had a smoke for quite some time, I can take it or leave it, would I like some?, hell yes, does that make me an addict? no.[/p][/quote]most withdrawal symptoms of anything are mental. shame you have abstained from something you really enjoy, must be for a financial reasons, I would legalise it by the way. I might get your vote ne day yet.[/p][/quote]Oh and which party would you be standing for? As regards no-one wanting to bother me on this thread could it be that the right wing have finally worked out that when you've got nothing to say it's best to say nothing or is it just that there's an election coming up and they don't want me to make them look any more stupid than they already do? That said this is now the most commented on story of the day. It's good to see some acknowledgement that addicts can just as easily be grandparents and ill people who get their drug of choice from their doctor and never deal with the dealers. If cannabis can be used to tackle alcoholism I believe the country would be better off for it if we did.[/p][/quote]only if we tax it ad add VAT.[/p][/quote]Whilst that is what campaign groups such as Clear are campaigning for it is important that the cost benefits of a regulated system of production are not lost by over taxing or the dealers will still be able to compete and getting them off the streets is more important than the tax revenue it may generate. I believe that people should have the right to grow their own if they wish but the number of plants would need to be limited to ensure that it was for their own personal use, perhaps through a licensing system. http://www.clear-uk. org/ RollandSmoke
  • Score: -1

8:46pm Wed 7 May 14

alive and awake says...

RollandSmoke wrote:
alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use.

Dependency and Withdrawal
According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits.
http://www.cannabis-







med.org/english/pati







ents-use.htm
Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly
There are no physical withdrawal symptoms. Sure people may crave it because they think it's nice just as some may crave chocolate. Is chocolate addictive? I've not had a smoke for quite some time, I can take it or leave it, would I like some?, hell yes, does that make me an addict? no.
most withdrawal symptoms of anything are mental. shame you have abstained from something you really enjoy, must be for a financial reasons, I would legalise it by the way. I might get your vote ne day yet.
Oh and which party would you be standing for? As regards no-one wanting to bother me on this thread could it be that the right wing have finally worked out that when you've got nothing to say it's best to say nothing or is it just that there's an election coming up and they don't want me to make them look any more stupid than they already do? That said this is now the most commented on story of the day. It's good to see some acknowledgement that addicts can just as easily be grandparents and ill people who get their drug of choice from their doctor and never deal with the dealers. If cannabis can be used to tackle alcoholism I believe the country would be better off for it if we did.
only if we tax it ad add VAT.
Whilst that is what campaign groups such as Clear are campaigning for it is important that the cost benefits of a regulated system of production are not lost by over taxing or the dealers will still be able to compete and getting them off the streets is more important than the tax revenue it may generate. I believe that people should have the right to grow their own if they wish but the number of plants would need to be limited to ensure that it was for their own personal use, perhaps through a licensing system.
http://www.clear-uk.

org/
a bit like now then eh!
[quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use. Dependency and Withdrawal According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits. http://www.cannabis- med.org/english/pati ents-use.htm[/p][/quote]Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly[/p][/quote]There are no physical withdrawal symptoms. Sure people may crave it because they think it's nice just as some may crave chocolate. Is chocolate addictive? I've not had a smoke for quite some time, I can take it or leave it, would I like some?, hell yes, does that make me an addict? no.[/p][/quote]most withdrawal symptoms of anything are mental. shame you have abstained from something you really enjoy, must be for a financial reasons, I would legalise it by the way. I might get your vote ne day yet.[/p][/quote]Oh and which party would you be standing for? As regards no-one wanting to bother me on this thread could it be that the right wing have finally worked out that when you've got nothing to say it's best to say nothing or is it just that there's an election coming up and they don't want me to make them look any more stupid than they already do? That said this is now the most commented on story of the day. It's good to see some acknowledgement that addicts can just as easily be grandparents and ill people who get their drug of choice from their doctor and never deal with the dealers. If cannabis can be used to tackle alcoholism I believe the country would be better off for it if we did.[/p][/quote]only if we tax it ad add VAT.[/p][/quote]Whilst that is what campaign groups such as Clear are campaigning for it is important that the cost benefits of a regulated system of production are not lost by over taxing or the dealers will still be able to compete and getting them off the streets is more important than the tax revenue it may generate. I believe that people should have the right to grow their own if they wish but the number of plants would need to be limited to ensure that it was for their own personal use, perhaps through a licensing system. http://www.clear-uk. org/[/p][/quote]a bit like now then eh! alive and awake
  • Score: 1

8:52pm Wed 7 May 14

RollandSmoke says...

alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use.

Dependency and Withdrawal
According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits.
http://www.cannabis-








med.org/english/pati








ents-use.htm
Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly
There are no physical withdrawal symptoms. Sure people may crave it because they think it's nice just as some may crave chocolate. Is chocolate addictive? I've not had a smoke for quite some time, I can take it or leave it, would I like some?, hell yes, does that make me an addict? no.
most withdrawal symptoms of anything are mental. shame you have abstained from something you really enjoy, must be for a financial reasons, I would legalise it by the way. I might get your vote ne day yet.
Oh and which party would you be standing for? As regards no-one wanting to bother me on this thread could it be that the right wing have finally worked out that when you've got nothing to say it's best to say nothing or is it just that there's an election coming up and they don't want me to make them look any more stupid than they already do? That said this is now the most commented on story of the day. It's good to see some acknowledgement that addicts can just as easily be grandparents and ill people who get their drug of choice from their doctor and never deal with the dealers. If cannabis can be used to tackle alcoholism I believe the country would be better off for it if we did.
only if we tax it ad add VAT.
Whilst that is what campaign groups such as Clear are campaigning for it is important that the cost benefits of a regulated system of production are not lost by over taxing or the dealers will still be able to compete and getting them off the streets is more important than the tax revenue it may generate. I believe that people should have the right to grow their own if they wish but the number of plants would need to be limited to ensure that it was for their own personal use, perhaps through a licensing system.
http://www.clear-uk.


org/
a bit like now then eh!
I'm sorry you've lost me. Do we have a regulated system of production? Where can I get my license to grow my own? In what way is it like now?
[quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: Here's something that Bridge won't tell you as it would effect their funding if they did. The most harmful thing about cannabis are the laws preventing it's use. Dependency and Withdrawal According to historical and modern case reports cannabis is a good remedy to combat withdrawal in dependency on benzodiazepines, opiates and alcohol. For this reason, some have referred to it as a gateway drug back. In this context, both the reduction of physical withdrawal symptoms and stress connected with discontinuance of drug abuse may play a role in its observed benefits. http://www.cannabis- med.org/english/pati ents-use.htm[/p][/quote]Well you have waited a long time for a chance to write on this subject, notice no one wants to bother with you. Don't insult peoples intelligence by saying Cannabis isn't addictive, that is just silly[/p][/quote]There are no physical withdrawal symptoms. Sure people may crave it because they think it's nice just as some may crave chocolate. Is chocolate addictive? I've not had a smoke for quite some time, I can take it or leave it, would I like some?, hell yes, does that make me an addict? no.[/p][/quote]most withdrawal symptoms of anything are mental. shame you have abstained from something you really enjoy, must be for a financial reasons, I would legalise it by the way. I might get your vote ne day yet.[/p][/quote]Oh and which party would you be standing for? As regards no-one wanting to bother me on this thread could it be that the right wing have finally worked out that when you've got nothing to say it's best to say nothing or is it just that there's an election coming up and they don't want me to make them look any more stupid than they already do? That said this is now the most commented on story of the day. It's good to see some acknowledgement that addicts can just as easily be grandparents and ill people who get their drug of choice from their doctor and never deal with the dealers. If cannabis can be used to tackle alcoholism I believe the country would be better off for it if we did.[/p][/quote]only if we tax it ad add VAT.[/p][/quote]Whilst that is what campaign groups such as Clear are campaigning for it is important that the cost benefits of a regulated system of production are not lost by over taxing or the dealers will still be able to compete and getting them off the streets is more important than the tax revenue it may generate. I believe that people should have the right to grow their own if they wish but the number of plants would need to be limited to ensure that it was for their own personal use, perhaps through a licensing system. http://www.clear-uk. org/[/p][/quote]a bit like now then eh![/p][/quote]I'm sorry you've lost me. Do we have a regulated system of production? Where can I get my license to grow my own? In what way is it like now? RollandSmoke
  • Score: 1

9:30pm Wed 7 May 14

RollandSmoke says...

It does however suprise me that this thread has not had more response given the amount of taxpayers money and police resources given over to trying to stop people like myself smoking or otherwise ingesting cannabis. Is it money and time well spent? It sure as hell ain't working. But more importantly is it justified? If not this is not justice but rather an infringements on my rights. If no-one can defend the status quo then isn't it time for change? The reason the right wing really haven't commented is that just as he did in his leadership campaign in 2005 David Cameron is now saying he wants to look at a change in the law. You would think I would be pleased but I know it's just a cynical ploy to gain the votes of the gullible before jumping back into the pockets of the Pharmaceutical and Alcohol industries should the nightmare scenario of his re-election happen. I don't trust him. I know a lot of you do but that's because you're stupid.
It does however suprise me that this thread has not had more response given the amount of taxpayers money and police resources given over to trying to stop people like myself smoking or otherwise ingesting cannabis. Is it money and time well spent? It sure as hell ain't working. But more importantly is it justified? If not this is not justice but rather an infringements on my rights. If no-one can defend the status quo then isn't it time for change? The reason the right wing really haven't commented is that just as he did in his leadership campaign in 2005 David Cameron is now saying he wants to look at a change in the law. You would think I would be pleased but I know it's just a cynical ploy to gain the votes of the gullible before jumping back into the pockets of the Pharmaceutical and Alcohol industries should the nightmare scenario of his re-election happen. I don't trust him. I know a lot of you do but that's because you're stupid. RollandSmoke
  • Score: -2

10:13pm Wed 7 May 14

alive and awake says...

RollandSmoke wrote:
It does however suprise me that this thread has not had more response given the amount of taxpayers money and police resources given over to trying to stop people like myself smoking or otherwise ingesting cannabis. Is it money and time well spent? It sure as hell ain't working. But more importantly is it justified? If not this is not justice but rather an infringements on my rights. If no-one can defend the status quo then isn't it time for change? The reason the right wing really haven't commented is that just as he did in his leadership campaign in 2005 David Cameron is now saying he wants to look at a change in the law. You would think I would be pleased but I know it's just a cynical ploy to gain the votes of the gullible before jumping back into the pockets of the Pharmaceutical and Alcohol industries should the nightmare scenario of his re-election happen. I don't trust him. I know a lot of you do but that's because you're stupid.
You think you would be better off with the likes of Rev. Flowers or Ed Balls?
[quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: It does however suprise me that this thread has not had more response given the amount of taxpayers money and police resources given over to trying to stop people like myself smoking or otherwise ingesting cannabis. Is it money and time well spent? It sure as hell ain't working. But more importantly is it justified? If not this is not justice but rather an infringements on my rights. If no-one can defend the status quo then isn't it time for change? The reason the right wing really haven't commented is that just as he did in his leadership campaign in 2005 David Cameron is now saying he wants to look at a change in the law. You would think I would be pleased but I know it's just a cynical ploy to gain the votes of the gullible before jumping back into the pockets of the Pharmaceutical and Alcohol industries should the nightmare scenario of his re-election happen. I don't trust him. I know a lot of you do but that's because you're stupid.[/p][/quote]You think you would be better off with the likes of Rev. Flowers or Ed Balls? alive and awake
  • Score: 1

10:37pm Wed 7 May 14

RollandSmoke says...

alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
It does however suprise me that this thread has not had more response given the amount of taxpayers money and police resources given over to trying to stop people like myself smoking or otherwise ingesting cannabis. Is it money and time well spent? It sure as hell ain't working. But more importantly is it justified? If not this is not justice but rather an infringements on my rights. If no-one can defend the status quo then isn't it time for change? The reason the right wing really haven't commented is that just as he did in his leadership campaign in 2005 David Cameron is now saying he wants to look at a change in the law. You would think I would be pleased but I know it's just a cynical ploy to gain the votes of the gullible before jumping back into the pockets of the Pharmaceutical and Alcohol industries should the nightmare scenario of his re-election happen. I don't trust him. I know a lot of you do but that's because you're stupid.
You think you would be better off with the likes of Rev. Flowers or Ed Balls?
Not really no we need to be moving much further to the left than the so called Labour party would be willing to go. The brown envelopes keep flowing regardless of who is in power. You never did tell me which party you would be standing for to get my vote but I am a socialist and believe that if we were to have a regulated market for cannabis then the estimated £6bn a year that this would bring into the economy should go to the people rather than into the pockets of rich business men so I would favor the majority of production to be nationalised as I would with industries that have become overwhelmingly automated. I still think people should have the right to grow their own so as not to be dependent on the nationalised source. I'd stand myself but I couldn't get the deposit together and there's still that health issue that just doesn't want to go away so we are left with a choice of party drones with little in the way of vision to vote for. I have no illusions that the results of the elections will bring happiness only a slight improvement or worsening of the current situation
[quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: It does however suprise me that this thread has not had more response given the amount of taxpayers money and police resources given over to trying to stop people like myself smoking or otherwise ingesting cannabis. Is it money and time well spent? It sure as hell ain't working. But more importantly is it justified? If not this is not justice but rather an infringements on my rights. If no-one can defend the status quo then isn't it time for change? The reason the right wing really haven't commented is that just as he did in his leadership campaign in 2005 David Cameron is now saying he wants to look at a change in the law. You would think I would be pleased but I know it's just a cynical ploy to gain the votes of the gullible before jumping back into the pockets of the Pharmaceutical and Alcohol industries should the nightmare scenario of his re-election happen. I don't trust him. I know a lot of you do but that's because you're stupid.[/p][/quote]You think you would be better off with the likes of Rev. Flowers or Ed Balls?[/p][/quote]Not really no we need to be moving much further to the left than the so called Labour party would be willing to go. The brown envelopes keep flowing regardless of who is in power. You never did tell me which party you would be standing for to get my vote but I am a socialist and believe that if we were to have a regulated market for cannabis then the estimated £6bn a year that this would bring into the economy should go to the people rather than into the pockets of rich business men so I would favor the majority of production to be nationalised as I would with industries that have become overwhelmingly automated. I still think people should have the right to grow their own so as not to be dependent on the nationalised source. I'd stand myself but I couldn't get the deposit together and there's still that health issue that just doesn't want to go away so we are left with a choice of party drones with little in the way of vision to vote for. I have no illusions that the results of the elections will bring happiness only a slight improvement or worsening of the current situation RollandSmoke
  • Score: -2

11:02pm Wed 7 May 14

alive and awake says...

RollandSmoke wrote:
alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
It does however suprise me that this thread has not had more response given the amount of taxpayers money and police resources given over to trying to stop people like myself smoking or otherwise ingesting cannabis. Is it money and time well spent? It sure as hell ain't working. But more importantly is it justified? If not this is not justice but rather an infringements on my rights. If no-one can defend the status quo then isn't it time for change? The reason the right wing really haven't commented is that just as he did in his leadership campaign in 2005 David Cameron is now saying he wants to look at a change in the law. You would think I would be pleased but I know it's just a cynical ploy to gain the votes of the gullible before jumping back into the pockets of the Pharmaceutical and Alcohol industries should the nightmare scenario of his re-election happen. I don't trust him. I know a lot of you do but that's because you're stupid.
You think you would be better off with the likes of Rev. Flowers or Ed Balls?
Not really no we need to be moving much further to the left than the so called Labour party would be willing to go. The brown envelopes keep flowing regardless of who is in power. You never did tell me which party you would be standing for to get my vote but I am a socialist and believe that if we were to have a regulated market for cannabis then the estimated £6bn a year that this would bring into the economy should go to the people rather than into the pockets of rich business men so I would favor the majority of production to be nationalised as I would with industries that have become overwhelmingly automated. I still think people should have the right to grow their own so as not to be dependent on the nationalised source. I'd stand myself but I couldn't get the deposit together and there's still that health issue that just doesn't want to go away so we are left with a choice of party drones with little in the way of vision to vote for. I have no illusions that the results of the elections will bring happiness only a slight improvement or worsening of the current situation
The type of Country you would create doesn't allow people to have rights o a say or a share of anything and certainly wouldn't allow a vote.
Russia, China, North Korea, Cuba, and many many more. stop being so naïve.
[quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: It does however suprise me that this thread has not had more response given the amount of taxpayers money and police resources given over to trying to stop people like myself smoking or otherwise ingesting cannabis. Is it money and time well spent? It sure as hell ain't working. But more importantly is it justified? If not this is not justice but rather an infringements on my rights. If no-one can defend the status quo then isn't it time for change? The reason the right wing really haven't commented is that just as he did in his leadership campaign in 2005 David Cameron is now saying he wants to look at a change in the law. You would think I would be pleased but I know it's just a cynical ploy to gain the votes of the gullible before jumping back into the pockets of the Pharmaceutical and Alcohol industries should the nightmare scenario of his re-election happen. I don't trust him. I know a lot of you do but that's because you're stupid.[/p][/quote]You think you would be better off with the likes of Rev. Flowers or Ed Balls?[/p][/quote]Not really no we need to be moving much further to the left than the so called Labour party would be willing to go. The brown envelopes keep flowing regardless of who is in power. You never did tell me which party you would be standing for to get my vote but I am a socialist and believe that if we were to have a regulated market for cannabis then the estimated £6bn a year that this would bring into the economy should go to the people rather than into the pockets of rich business men so I would favor the majority of production to be nationalised as I would with industries that have become overwhelmingly automated. I still think people should have the right to grow their own so as not to be dependent on the nationalised source. I'd stand myself but I couldn't get the deposit together and there's still that health issue that just doesn't want to go away so we are left with a choice of party drones with little in the way of vision to vote for. I have no illusions that the results of the elections will bring happiness only a slight improvement or worsening of the current situation[/p][/quote]The type of Country you would create doesn't allow people to have rights o a say or a share of anything and certainly wouldn't allow a vote. Russia, China, North Korea, Cuba, and many many more. stop being so naïve. alive and awake
  • Score: 2

11:13pm Wed 7 May 14

RollandSmoke says...

alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
alive and awake wrote:
RollandSmoke wrote:
It does however suprise me that this thread has not had more response given the amount of taxpayers money and police resources given over to trying to stop people like myself smoking or otherwise ingesting cannabis. Is it money and time well spent? It sure as hell ain't working. But more importantly is it justified? If not this is not justice but rather an infringements on my rights. If no-one can defend the status quo then isn't it time for change? The reason the right wing really haven't commented is that just as he did in his leadership campaign in 2005 David Cameron is now saying he wants to look at a change in the law. You would think I would be pleased but I know it's just a cynical ploy to gain the votes of the gullible before jumping back into the pockets of the Pharmaceutical and Alcohol industries should the nightmare scenario of his re-election happen. I don't trust him. I know a lot of you do but that's because you're stupid.
You think you would be better off with the likes of Rev. Flowers or Ed Balls?
Not really no we need to be moving much further to the left than the so called Labour party would be willing to go. The brown envelopes keep flowing regardless of who is in power. You never did tell me which party you would be standing for to get my vote but I am a socialist and believe that if we were to have a regulated market for cannabis then the estimated £6bn a year that this would bring into the economy should go to the people rather than into the pockets of rich business men so I would favor the majority of production to be nationalised as I would with industries that have become overwhelmingly automated. I still think people should have the right to grow their own so as not to be dependent on the nationalised source. I'd stand myself but I couldn't get the deposit together and there's still that health issue that just doesn't want to go away so we are left with a choice of party drones with little in the way of vision to vote for. I have no illusions that the results of the elections will bring happiness only a slight improvement or worsening of the current situation
The type of Country you would create doesn't allow people to have rights o a say or a share of anything and certainly wouldn't allow a vote.
Russia, China, North Korea, Cuba, and many many more. stop being so naïve.
Are you saying that a democracy couldn't be run under socialist principles? There will always be examples of where things have gone wrong but the secret is to learn from them and avoid making the same mistakes. We have seen what capitalism brings, huge wealth inequality and the vast majority barely escaping poverty whilst the top few percent have wealth beyond your wildest dreams let alone sufficient for their every whim of desire and no chance of ever being able to spend all this wealth rather hoarding it away where it is no longer a part of the economy. This is why we are nearly bankrupt. Our economy cannot function properly with so much wealth in so few hands.
[quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alive and awake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]RollandSmoke[/bold] wrote: It does however suprise me that this thread has not had more response given the amount of taxpayers money and police resources given over to trying to stop people like myself smoking or otherwise ingesting cannabis. Is it money and time well spent? It sure as hell ain't working. But more importantly is it justified? If not this is not justice but rather an infringements on my rights. If no-one can defend the status quo then isn't it time for change? The reason the right wing really haven't commented is that just as he did in his leadership campaign in 2005 David Cameron is now saying he wants to look at a change in the law. You would think I would be pleased but I know it's just a cynical ploy to gain the votes of the gullible before jumping back into the pockets of the Pharmaceutical and Alcohol industries should the nightmare scenario of his re-election happen. I don't trust him. I know a lot of you do but that's because you're stupid.[/p][/quote]You think you would be better off with the likes of Rev. Flowers or Ed Balls?[/p][/quote]Not really no we need to be moving much further to the left than the so called Labour party would be willing to go. The brown envelopes keep flowing regardless of who is in power. You never did tell me which party you would be standing for to get my vote but I am a socialist and believe that if we were to have a regulated market for cannabis then the estimated £6bn a year that this would bring into the economy should go to the people rather than into the pockets of rich business men so I would favor the majority of production to be nationalised as I would with industries that have become overwhelmingly automated. I still think people should have the right to grow their own so as not to be dependent on the nationalised source. I'd stand myself but I couldn't get the deposit together and there's still that health issue that just doesn't want to go away so we are left with a choice of party drones with little in the way of vision to vote for. I have no illusions that the results of the elections will bring happiness only a slight improvement or worsening of the current situation[/p][/quote]The type of Country you would create doesn't allow people to have rights o a say or a share of anything and certainly wouldn't allow a vote. Russia, China, North Korea, Cuba, and many many more. stop being so naïve.[/p][/quote]Are you saying that a democracy couldn't be run under socialist principles? There will always be examples of where things have gone wrong but the secret is to learn from them and avoid making the same mistakes. We have seen what capitalism brings, huge wealth inequality and the vast majority barely escaping poverty whilst the top few percent have wealth beyond your wildest dreams let alone sufficient for their every whim of desire and no chance of ever being able to spend all this wealth rather hoarding it away where it is no longer a part of the economy. This is why we are nearly bankrupt. Our economy cannot function properly with so much wealth in so few hands. RollandSmoke
  • Score: -3

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