More than 100 Bradford and district schools to close in strike action

Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Hundreds of classes will be cancelled in Bradford tomorrow. Hundreds of classes will be cancelled in Bradford tomorrow.

More than 100 schools in the Bradford district will either be closed or partially closed due to a national teachers’ strike tomorrow.

The industrial action by the National Union of Teachers is over “excessive” workloads and changes to pensions.

Although sister union the NASUWT will not be taking part in the strike, 103 schools in Bradford district have announced be closed, or partially closed, during the day of action.

Teachers from the Bradford, Kirklees and Calderdale local authority areas will be holding a rally in Bradford city centre tomorrow, starting at 11am on Centenary Square.

The current list of schools affected in the Bradford district is as follows: Addingham Primary School - partial closure.

School will be closed to students in reception and year one.

Aire View Infant School - full closure.

All Saints' CE Primary School (Bradford) - full closure.

Nell Bank residential for year four still going ahead.

All Saints' CE Primary School (Ilkley) - partial closure.

All pupils to attend except 6T and 6W.

Allerton Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to reception, years one, three and four.

Atlas Community Primary School - partial closure.

Reception class and years one, two and three are closed.

Belle Vue Boys' School - partial closure.

Closed to students in years seven to ten.

Ben Rhydding Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to all pupils apart from those in years two and five.

Blakehill Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to students in classes 6R, 4W and 5D. Mrs Davidson's Maths Gifted & Talented after school club will be cancelled but all other after school clubs will be going ahead as usual.

Brackenhill Primary School - full closure.

Bradford Central PRU - full closure.

Bradford District PRU - partial closure.

Burley & Woodhead CE Primary School- partial closure.

Closed to reception class and years three and four.

Buttershaw Business & Enterprise College - partial closure..

Closed to years seven, eight and nine.

Carlton Bolling College - - full closure.

Carrwood Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to RECP2, YR1G, YR1A, YR2D, YR2A, YR4P, YR5 and Amber and Phoenix unit.

Chellow Heights Special School - full closure.

Clayton CE Primary School - partial closure.

Copthorne Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to nursery, 1R, 1 Oak, 2 Elm and 5 Willow.

Crossflatts Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to all but nursery and years five and six.

Breakfast Club, school lunch and Crazy Cats After School Club will be provided as normal.

Crossley Hall Primary School - full closure.

Cullingworth Village Primary School - full closure.

Denholme Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to pupils in reception class and year six.

Dixons Marchbank Academy - partial closure..

Closed to all but nursery, reception, year three, year six and year five Mexico.

Eldwick Primary School - full closure.

Fagley Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to nursery, reception, years two, three and five.

Farnham Primary School - full closure.

Fearnville Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to year two Elephants Class and year six Falcons Class.

Feversham College - partial closure.

School closed to year seven and eight students.

Frizinghall Primary School - partial closure.

Open to afternoon nursery, 3Y, 3J, 4K, 5J, 6A and 6S.

Breakfast Clubs and all activities in the Community Room will operate as normal.

Greengates Primary School - full closure.

Hanson School - full closure.

Year ten GCSE Art students will be in taking an Art GCSE practical examination in the morning, which will be manned by external invigilators alongside staff who are not taking part in the industrial action.

Haworth Primary School - partial closure.

Open as normal for pupils in nursery, reception, years three and six.

Heaton Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to classes RL, RC, BT3, BS3, BH3, BD4, BF4. The Acorn Centre is also closed.

High Crags Primary School - full closure.

Hill Top CE Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to Key Stage two.

Hirst Wood Nursery School - full closure.

Hollingwood Primary School - partial closure.

Holybrook Primary School - full closure.

The Horizons Centre will also be closed.

Holycroft Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to nursery, Yr 2 CP, year three, year four, Yr 5 FT. Closed to year six in the morning.

Home Farm Primary School - partial closure.

Horton Grange Primary School - full closure.

Horton Park Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to Reception Class - RB (Bumblebees) and year two class - 2B (Panthers).

Hothfield Junior School - partial closure.

Closed to years three, four and six.

Killinghall Primary School - full closure.

Knowleswood Primary School - full closure.

Laisterdyke Business and Enterprise College - partial closure.

Open to students in years 11 and 13 only from 9.20am. College will close to students at 2.45pm.

Lapage Primary School and Nursery - partial closure.

Closed to nursery and years four and five.

Ley Top Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to class 2EJ.

Lilycroft Nursery School - partial closure.

Lilycroft Primary School partial closure.

The following classes must still attend - 2ML, 2DH, 3ML, 3DH, 4SL, 5ML, 6ML. 4SL will still be going to Nell Bank Lister Primary School - partial closure.

Year one visit to go ahead.

Long Lee Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to children in 1B, years five and six.

Lower Fields Primary School - partial closure.

Open to nursery, reception blue and red, Class 1M, Class 1H, Class 2C, Class 3C, Class 4C.

Margaret McMillan Primary School - partial closure.

School will be closed for the following classes; Mars, Mercury, Neputne, Sharman, Hawking, Galileo, Hockney, Newton, Pankhurst and Fibonacci Nessfield Primary School - partial closure.

School will be closed to children in Classes four and nine.

Newhall Park Primary School - full closure.

Oakbank School - partial closure.

Year seven open all day, year eight closed all day, year nine closed all day, year ten open from 11am, year 11 open all day, year 12 open all day, year 13 open all day.

Oakworth Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to 1 Dolphins, 2 Tigers and 4 Panthers.

Oastler's School - full closure.

Our Lady & St Brendan's Catholic Primary School - partial closure.

School closed for reception and year three.

Oxenhope CE Primary School - partial closure.

School closed to year one.

Parkland Primary School - full closure.

The Albion Famliy Centre and the Parkland Children's Centre will be open as normal.

Parkside School - partial closure.

Closed for years seven, eight, nine and ten.

Parkwood Primary School - partial closure.

Only year five will be closed - all other classes remain open.

Peel Park Primary School - full closure.

Phoenix Special School - partial closure.

Letters have been sent to parents to inform them if their child is not expected in school due to Teacher's Strike.

PTS has been informed which children will not be in school.

Poplars Farm Primary School - partial closure.

Additional notes: The school will be closed to pupils in Years 1 ,2 and 5 due to the NUT strike action.

The school will be open for all other pupils in Years 3,4,,6, Reception and Nursery.

Queensbury School - partial closure.

Additional notes: The school will be closed to years seven to 11.

Saltaire Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to classes 2G, 3C, 5C and 6P.

Sandal Primary School and Nursery - partial closure.

Closed to nursery AM & PM, RW, 1F, 6H and 6E.

Shipley CE Primary School - partial closure.

School will be closed to pupils in year one. 

Shirley Manor Primary School - partial closure.

Year five trip still going ahead. Breakfast and after school club still open. Tri-golf still on after school for KS1 pupils.

Southmere Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to reception Ash, year two Silver Birch, year three Chestnut, year four Willow.

Springwood Community Primary School - full closure.

St Columba's Catholic Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to classes 1RW, 2CR, 2LG, 5MD and 5CP.

St Cuthbert & the First Martyrs' Catholic Primary - partial closure.

Closed to Nursery, Reception, years one, two, five and six.

St Edmund's Nursery School & Children's Centre - partial closure.

St Francis' Catholic Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to years two and five.

St James' Church Primary School - partial closure.

School will be closed for all pupils except year six.

St Joseph's Catholic College - partial closure.

Closed to years seven, eight, nine and ten.

St Joseph's Catholic Primary School (Bingley) - partial closure.

Closed to reception class, years four and five.

St Matthew's Catholic Primary School - partial closure.

The following classes will be closed: F1, F2, Y1 and Y4.

St Matthew's CE Primary School - partial closure.

St Stephen's CE Primary School - partial closure.

The Willow building will be closed to all pupils.

St William's Catholic Primary School - full closure.

Stanbury Village School - partial closure.

Closed to classes one, two and three.

Steeton Primary School - full closure.

Thackley Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to pupils in Reception – blue Roaring Rockets class only.

Thornbury Primary School - full closure.

Thornton Grammar School - partial closure.

Open as normal for Post 16 students Thornton Primary School - partial closure.

Thorpe Primary School - partial closure.

School will be closed to years one, two, three and five. No after-school multi-skills session.

Titus Salt School - partial closure.

The school is closed for years nine and ten.

Tong High School - partial closure.

The school will be closed to years seven to ten, but will remain open for year 11 and all Post 16 students who should attend as normal.

Victoria Primary School - partial closure.

School will be closed to students in year two.

Wellington Primary School - partial closure.

School closed for 1S, 2M, 2L, 3B and 5J due to teachers' strike action.

Westbourne Primary School - partial closure.

Only children in afternoon Nursery, Reception M and 5W should go to school.

Westminster CE Primary School - full closure.

Wibsey Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to R1, R3, 1-1, 5-2, 6-1, 6-2.

Wilsden Primary School - partial closure.

Closed to calsses 1HB, 2RW, 3RE, 4JK, 4JW, 5HI, 6LS.

Worth Valley Primary School - full closure.

For closures in Kirklees visit
http://www2.kirklees.gov.uk/community/education-learning/schoolclosure/Closurelist.aspx?tomorrow=1

For Closures in Calderdale visit
http://www.calderdale.gov.uk/education/closures/status.jsp?establishment=SCH&offset=0#results

For school closures in Leeds visit
http://www.leeds.gov.uk/residents/Pages/School-closures.aspx

Comments (5)

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8:02pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Mik_e says...

Why is it that if parents keep children off school without good reason, they are now fined and yet if striking teachers prevent children from going to school they are not subject to any form of punishment?
Seems very one sided?
Why is it that if parents keep children off school without good reason, they are now fined and yet if striking teachers prevent children from going to school they are not subject to any form of punishment? Seems very one sided? Mik_e
  • Score: 9

9:19pm Tue 25 Mar 14

JAtkinson says...

Teachers (I am one) work in excess of 60 hours a week, are having pay & conditions reduced constantly, are blasted in the press by the Department of Education & Government, and are subject to huge changes in working practices on the whim of a Minister who ignores every piece of evidence presented to him, even evidence from his own advisers. Morale is at an all-time low, real pay is decreasing, 60% of new teachers quit within 5 years and 30% of senior teachers are considering leaving the profession.

In schools, class sizes are rising, teachers are being given less time to plan, prepare & mark work, and the government is taking away your child's right to be taught by a trained, qualified teacher.

The government is giving away £millions in land and buildings to companies who are gearing up to a free-for-all, for profit privatisation of education.

And through all this, standards of teaching, standards of education and students' grades are rising by any and all (and there are many, many) yardsticks put against them.

In the face of all this, Michael Gove has offered unions ONE HOUR of his precious time to sort this out.

I'm not on strike tomorrow as my union called off strike action in the hope Gove would come to the table for a meaningful discussion over the future of education. He hasn't.

I you are OK having your kids in an over-crowded classroom, taught by an over-worked, under-paid, stressed unqualified 68 year old who has never been educated in pedagogical practice, and who does not have the energy or time to plan properly & develop their own practice, ignore tomorrow's action.

If you'd prefer an educated, qualified professional who cares about how your child does and knows how to get the best from him / her, who is treated fairly by employers, the government and press, and who will do their best for every child in their care, support the teachers and tell the politicians to treat teachers fairly, with dignity & respect, and listen to their concerns.
Teachers (I am one) work in excess of 60 hours a week, are having pay & conditions reduced constantly, are blasted in the press by the Department of Education & Government, and are subject to huge changes in working practices on the whim of a Minister who ignores every piece of evidence presented to him, even evidence from his own advisers. Morale is at an all-time low, real pay is decreasing, 60% of new teachers quit within 5 years and 30% of senior teachers are considering leaving the profession. In schools, class sizes are rising, teachers are being given less time to plan, prepare & mark work, and the government is taking away your child's right to be taught by a trained, qualified teacher. The government is giving away £millions in land and buildings to companies who are gearing up to a free-for-all, for profit privatisation of education. And through all this, standards of teaching, standards of education and students' grades are rising by any and all (and there are many, many) yardsticks put against them. In the face of all this, Michael Gove has offered unions ONE HOUR of his precious time to sort this out. I'm not on strike tomorrow as my union called off strike action in the hope Gove would come to the table for a meaningful discussion over the future of education. He hasn't. I you are OK having your kids in an over-crowded classroom, taught by an over-worked, under-paid, stressed unqualified 68 year old who has never been educated in pedagogical practice, and who does not have the energy or time to plan properly & develop their own practice, ignore tomorrow's action. If you'd prefer an educated, qualified professional who cares about how your child does and knows how to get the best from him / her, who is treated fairly by employers, the government and press, and who will do their best for every child in their care, support the teachers and tell the politicians to treat teachers fairly, with dignity & respect, and listen to their concerns. JAtkinson
  • Score: 7

10:37pm Tue 25 Mar 14

tinytoonster says...

JAtkinson wrote:
Teachers (I am one) work in excess of 60 hours a week, are having pay & conditions reduced constantly, are blasted in the press by the Department of Education & Government, and are subject to huge changes in working practices on the whim of a Minister who ignores every piece of evidence presented to him, even evidence from his own advisers. Morale is at an all-time low, real pay is decreasing, 60% of new teachers quit within 5 years and 30% of senior teachers are considering leaving the profession.

In schools, class sizes are rising, teachers are being given less time to plan, prepare & mark work, and the government is taking away your child's right to be taught by a trained, qualified teacher.

The government is giving away £millions in land and buildings to companies who are gearing up to a free-for-all, for profit privatisation of education.

And through all this, standards of teaching, standards of education and students' grades are rising by any and all (and there are many, many) yardsticks put against them.

In the face of all this, Michael Gove has offered unions ONE HOUR of his precious time to sort this out.

I'm not on strike tomorrow as my union called off strike action in the hope Gove would come to the table for a meaningful discussion over the future of education. He hasn't.

I you are OK having your kids in an over-crowded classroom, taught by an over-worked, under-paid, stressed unqualified 68 year old who has never been educated in pedagogical practice, and who does not have the energy or time to plan properly & develop their own practice, ignore tomorrow's action.

If you'd prefer an educated, qualified professional who cares about how your child does and knows how to get the best from him / her, who is treated fairly by employers, the government and press, and who will do their best for every child in their care, support the teachers and tell the politicians to treat teachers fairly, with dignity & respect, and listen to their concerns.
i agree with your comment but like anything else, striking will achieve nothing but inconvenience for parents who get hammered with childcare.
look at royal mail. strikes achieved nothing.
privatised and job losses.
and before we get the conservatives fault argument, labour brought up the royal mail idea first and we had academies when they were in power.
education is vital.
[quote][p][bold]JAtkinson[/bold] wrote: Teachers (I am one) work in excess of 60 hours a week, are having pay & conditions reduced constantly, are blasted in the press by the Department of Education & Government, and are subject to huge changes in working practices on the whim of a Minister who ignores every piece of evidence presented to him, even evidence from his own advisers. Morale is at an all-time low, real pay is decreasing, 60% of new teachers quit within 5 years and 30% of senior teachers are considering leaving the profession. In schools, class sizes are rising, teachers are being given less time to plan, prepare & mark work, and the government is taking away your child's right to be taught by a trained, qualified teacher. The government is giving away £millions in land and buildings to companies who are gearing up to a free-for-all, for profit privatisation of education. And through all this, standards of teaching, standards of education and students' grades are rising by any and all (and there are many, many) yardsticks put against them. In the face of all this, Michael Gove has offered unions ONE HOUR of his precious time to sort this out. I'm not on strike tomorrow as my union called off strike action in the hope Gove would come to the table for a meaningful discussion over the future of education. He hasn't. I you are OK having your kids in an over-crowded classroom, taught by an over-worked, under-paid, stressed unqualified 68 year old who has never been educated in pedagogical practice, and who does not have the energy or time to plan properly & develop their own practice, ignore tomorrow's action. If you'd prefer an educated, qualified professional who cares about how your child does and knows how to get the best from him / her, who is treated fairly by employers, the government and press, and who will do their best for every child in their care, support the teachers and tell the politicians to treat teachers fairly, with dignity & respect, and listen to their concerns.[/p][/quote]i agree with your comment but like anything else, striking will achieve nothing but inconvenience for parents who get hammered with childcare. look at royal mail. strikes achieved nothing. privatised and job losses. and before we get the conservatives fault argument, labour brought up the royal mail idea first and we had academies when they were in power. education is vital. tinytoonster
  • Score: 3

11:19pm Tue 25 Mar 14

Wanna Have says...

tinytoonster wrote:
JAtkinson wrote:
Teachers (I am one) work in excess of 60 hours a week, are having pay & conditions reduced constantly, are blasted in the press by the Department of Education & Government, and are subject to huge changes in working practices on the whim of a Minister who ignores every piece of evidence presented to him, even evidence from his own advisers. Morale is at an all-time low, real pay is decreasing, 60% of new teachers quit within 5 years and 30% of senior teachers are considering leaving the profession.

In schools, class sizes are rising, teachers are being given less time to plan, prepare & mark work, and the government is taking away your child's right to be taught by a trained, qualified teacher.

The government is giving away £millions in land and buildings to companies who are gearing up to a free-for-all, for profit privatisation of education.

And through all this, standards of teaching, standards of education and students' grades are rising by any and all (and there are many, many) yardsticks put against them.

In the face of all this, Michael Gove has offered unions ONE HOUR of his precious time to sort this out.

I'm not on strike tomorrow as my union called off strike action in the hope Gove would come to the table for a meaningful discussion over the future of education. He hasn't.

I you are OK having your kids in an over-crowded classroom, taught by an over-worked, under-paid, stressed unqualified 68 year old who has never been educated in pedagogical practice, and who does not have the energy or time to plan properly & develop their own practice, ignore tomorrow's action.

If you'd prefer an educated, qualified professional who cares about how your child does and knows how to get the best from him / her, who is treated fairly by employers, the government and press, and who will do their best for every child in their care, support the teachers and tell the politicians to treat teachers fairly, with dignity & respect, and listen to their concerns.
i agree with your comment but like anything else, striking will achieve nothing but inconvenience for parents who get hammered with childcare.
look at royal mail. strikes achieved nothing.
privatised and job losses.
and before we get the conservatives fault argument, labour brought up the royal mail idea first and we had academies when they were in power.
education is vital.
Yes good point let's see who wins your race to the bottom,nothing such as industrial action should stand in the way of that.
[quote][p][bold]tinytoonster[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]JAtkinson[/bold] wrote: Teachers (I am one) work in excess of 60 hours a week, are having pay & conditions reduced constantly, are blasted in the press by the Department of Education & Government, and are subject to huge changes in working practices on the whim of a Minister who ignores every piece of evidence presented to him, even evidence from his own advisers. Morale is at an all-time low, real pay is decreasing, 60% of new teachers quit within 5 years and 30% of senior teachers are considering leaving the profession. In schools, class sizes are rising, teachers are being given less time to plan, prepare & mark work, and the government is taking away your child's right to be taught by a trained, qualified teacher. The government is giving away £millions in land and buildings to companies who are gearing up to a free-for-all, for profit privatisation of education. And through all this, standards of teaching, standards of education and students' grades are rising by any and all (and there are many, many) yardsticks put against them. In the face of all this, Michael Gove has offered unions ONE HOUR of his precious time to sort this out. I'm not on strike tomorrow as my union called off strike action in the hope Gove would come to the table for a meaningful discussion over the future of education. He hasn't. I you are OK having your kids in an over-crowded classroom, taught by an over-worked, under-paid, stressed unqualified 68 year old who has never been educated in pedagogical practice, and who does not have the energy or time to plan properly & develop their own practice, ignore tomorrow's action. If you'd prefer an educated, qualified professional who cares about how your child does and knows how to get the best from him / her, who is treated fairly by employers, the government and press, and who will do their best for every child in their care, support the teachers and tell the politicians to treat teachers fairly, with dignity & respect, and listen to their concerns.[/p][/quote]i agree with your comment but like anything else, striking will achieve nothing but inconvenience for parents who get hammered with childcare. look at royal mail. strikes achieved nothing. privatised and job losses. and before we get the conservatives fault argument, labour brought up the royal mail idea first and we had academies when they were in power. education is vital.[/p][/quote]Yes good point let's see who wins your race to the bottom,nothing such as industrial action should stand in the way of that. Wanna Have
  • Score: 1

12:50am Wed 26 Mar 14

Ratters Rat says...

Well my children's school will receive a bill from us for £120.00 that is for not providing our child with an education. Which will double in 21 days if not paid. We are not allowed to take our child out of school when we want a holiday or a few days away so the same thing applies to them. I understand that teachers want to protest and support them to a point but they have no rights to stop children getting an education.
Many other companies have changed workers conditions pensions ect why therefore should teachers be exempt from this ?
They need to find a way to protest that will get them support at the moment all they are doing is making parents angry who will have to find child care or take unpaid leave as many will not have any holidays left as many people holidays start April to April.
Well my children's school will receive a bill from us for £120.00 that is for not providing our child with an education. Which will double in 21 days if not paid. We are not allowed to take our child out of school when we want a holiday or a few days away so the same thing applies to them. I understand that teachers want to protest and support them to a point but they have no rights to stop children getting an education. Many other companies have changed workers conditions pensions ect why therefore should teachers be exempt from this ? They need to find a way to protest that will get them support at the moment all they are doing is making parents angry who will have to find child care or take unpaid leave as many will not have any holidays left as many people holidays start April to April. Ratters Rat
  • Score: 1

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