Bradford Industrial Museum gets biomass boiler

Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Bradford Industrial Museum Bradford Industrial Museum

An attraction documenting Bradford’s smoggy industrial past will soon become a shining example of “green” energy.

Bradford Industrial Museum, based in the 140-year-old Moorside Mills building, will next month see the installation of a low-carbon “biomass boiler” that will power the building.

Once up and running, it will cut down the Council-run museum’s carbon emissions by 130 tonnes a year, and the Council says it is “quite fitting” that a revolutionary piece of machinery would power a building containing machines that made Bradford an industrial superpower.

Four years ago, Bradford Council unanimously agreed to reduce its carbon footprint, mainly through using less fuel and investing in renewable energy for its buildings.

Similar low carbon boilers are already being used to power City Hall and Ilkley Town Hall.

Moorside Mills, on Moorside Road in Eccleshill, has been run as a museum since the 1970s, when Bradford Council bought the mill and turned it into a centre where the district’s industrial past is celebrated. Inside the large building there are working examples of the machinery used in the city’s industrial heyday as well as a collection of antique vehicles and trams.

The boiler will replace the existing gas boilers with one that burns wood pellets to power the building and it will be housed in an existing plantroom.

When they approved the boiler, planning officers pointed out that although they reduce carbon, such boilers can cause health problems because of their emissions. To mitigate this, the boiler at the industrial museum will have a filter that will remove 95 per cent of particle emissions.

A Council spokesman said: “It will reduce the museum’s carbon emissions by up to 130 tonnes a year.”

Comments (5)

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8:58am Wed 19 Mar 14

porkfat says...

Good news, have the council paid for it and therefore will be receiving the government subsidy? or have they allowed a company to profiteer by installing it for free in return for the RHI payments?
Good news, have the council paid for it and therefore will be receiving the government subsidy? or have they allowed a company to profiteer by installing it for free in return for the RHI payments? porkfat
  • Score: 1

10:58am Wed 19 Mar 14

Albion. says...

porkfat wrote:
Good news, have the council paid for it and therefore will be receiving the government subsidy? or have they allowed a company to profiteer by installing it for free in return for the RHI payments?
The council paid fore it.
[quote][p][bold]porkfat[/bold] wrote: Good news, have the council paid for it and therefore will be receiving the government subsidy? or have they allowed a company to profiteer by installing it for free in return for the RHI payments?[/p][/quote]The council paid fore it. Albion.
  • Score: 1

11:04am Wed 19 Mar 14

BagOfMonkeys says...

130 tonnes, one hundred and thirty?? Who the devil calculated that one then?! What are they blooming doing up at the old Industrial Museum to use a quantity of energy that releases 130 tonnes of carbon into the atmosphere?
130 tonnes, one hundred and thirty?? Who the devil calculated that one then?! What are they blooming doing up at the old Industrial Museum to use a quantity of energy that releases 130 tonnes of carbon into the atmosphere? BagOfMonkeys
  • Score: 1

11:21am Wed 19 Mar 14

collos25 says...

Bio mass boilers installed by various councils in schools ,and council offices have to have a small gas boiler as back up after a few weeks they are running totally on the gas boiler as the pellet boiler is for ever breaking down so an engineer in his van is always having to call.They use an screw mechanism to feed them which is always getting jammed up the pellets can brought from Canada or the nearest large UK supplier in Scotland by road negating any C02 savings.Not one of the Bio mass boilers proved to successful during my time at a large MDC and no other council had any success either .Look at the wind turbines on the roof at certain school in Cleckheaton along with its Bio mass boiler.
Bio mass boilers installed by various councils in schools ,and council offices have to have a small gas boiler as back up after a few weeks they are running totally on the gas boiler as the pellet boiler is for ever breaking down so an engineer in his van is always having to call.They use an screw mechanism to feed them which is always getting jammed up the pellets can brought from Canada or the nearest large UK supplier in Scotland by road negating any C02 savings.Not one of the Bio mass boilers proved to successful during my time at a large MDC and no other council had any success either .Look at the wind turbines on the roof at certain school in Cleckheaton along with its Bio mass boiler. collos25
  • Score: 1

4:31pm Wed 19 Mar 14

mad matt says...

They should have kept the horses - you get a lot of heat off a pile of 'oss muck
(nearly as much as you get from a council meeting)
They should have kept the horses - you get a lot of heat off a pile of 'oss muck (nearly as much as you get from a council meeting) mad matt
  • Score: 4

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