Scheme means shops around Westfield development won’t need change of use application

Empty shop in Bradford city centre

Bradford Council leader, Councillor David Green

First published in News Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Photograph of the Author by , City Hall Reporter

Schemes designed to maximise the impact of Westfield’s £260 million shopping centre on the city’s economy have been given the green light.

Bradford Council’s Executive yesterday agreed to relax planning rules on the streets around the Westfield site, meaning businesses will not have to apply for change of use to open shops, restaurants, bars or offices.

But firms will not be able to open takeaways, betting shops, pawnbrokers or payday lenders without permission.

Council leader, Councillor David Green (Lab), asked for amusement arcades to be added to this list as well.

Across the wider city centre, rules will also be relaxed to make it easier to turn the upper floors of shops into flats.

The two ideas will now go out to a public consultation.

Councillor Val Slater (Lab), executive member for planning, said: “I think we are looking upon them as a pilot. Following the consultation, and if and when we decide to go forward on them, we will evaluate them, looking at whether they will be suitable in other areas of the wider district, such as Keighley and Shipley town centres.”

The Executive also agreed plans to set up a retail academy, as part of the highly-regarded Get Bradford Working programme.

The academy will mainly be aimed at training people so they are more likely to land jobs at Westfield’s Broadway Shopping Centre once it opens.

Coun Green said: “The Westfield jobs are clearly key but it is going to be available to all retailers in the city centre and outside it, because we are expecting to see the growth of retail, not just in Westfield but across the city centre and elsewhere.”

The meeting also heard about two new temporary rate relief schemes paid for by the Government.

One means that shops with a rateable value of up to £50,000 are exempt from business rates, up to a value of £1,000.

The other means that a business moving into a shop which had been empty for at least a year only has to pay half their rates for the first 18 months.

Coun Green said he welcomed the Government scheme, as it fitted in with the other measures designed to boost city-centre shopping.

He said: “The steps that the Council has taken have started to increase interest and confidence in Bradford. We are starting to see this come to fruition, and this can only help us develop that.”

Comments (22)

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6:34am Wed 12 Mar 14

Albion. says...

They're getting desperate now! Bazaar anyone?
They're getting desperate now! Bazaar anyone? Albion.
  • Score: -8

6:59am Wed 12 Mar 14

collos25 says...

They is a consultation period a evaluation period and rhen they may not go through with it a vey decisive council,
councilor VS is in charge so after her other expensive failures I would not hold your breath
They is a consultation period a evaluation period and rhen they may not go through with it a vey decisive council, councilor VS is in charge so after her other expensive failures I would not hold your breath collos25
  • Score: -7

8:30am Wed 12 Mar 14

tinytoonster says...

i notice the rate relief scheme is a government funded scheme.
well bradford council would not pay.
all take take with them!!
i notice the rate relief scheme is a government funded scheme. well bradford council would not pay. all take take with them!! tinytoonster
  • Score: -6

9:03am Wed 12 Mar 14

alive and awake says...

Albion. wrote:
They're getting desperate now! Bazaar anyone?
Green won't have thought of that, the whole area will become a souk
[quote][p][bold]Albion.[/bold] wrote: They're getting desperate now! Bazaar anyone?[/p][/quote]Green won't have thought of that, the whole area will become a souk alive and awake
  • Score: 0

9:33am Wed 12 Mar 14

JAtkinson says...

People will come to Bradford to go to Westfield... once. Making sure the journey from bus, train or car is interrupted by frequent shopping stops at decent, full outlets will make them come back.

I think it's a really, really good idea which will ensure the benefits of Westfield are maximised. However, if it remains as a plan, as so much does in Bradford, we'll get a fraction of the benefits.
People will come to Bradford to go to Westfield... once. Making sure the journey from bus, train or car is interrupted by frequent shopping stops at decent, full outlets will make them come back. I think it's a really, really good idea which will ensure the benefits of Westfield are maximised. However, if it remains as a plan, as so much does in Bradford, we'll get a fraction of the benefits. JAtkinson
  • Score: 12

10:54am Wed 12 Mar 14

Papa Smurfs Wig says...

If the people coming by bus or train manage to get to the centre manage to avoid the beggars snd drunks then they might come back again if the place isn't mainly the typical chain shops. But the begging etc needs sorting out now and making begging in the city illegal. Then again drinking on the streets is illegal but not much gets done about that. The council and police always have a ready made answer "we don't have the resources to implement these measures to move them on"
The central government funding for this isn't the only help offered, the rates are also helped if you employ a government funded apprentice.
I bet they are sick of Bradford council going to them cap in hand after years of sham decisions by the council and whatever political persuasion they are. Years of idiotic decisions have made this city a laughing stock.
Dave Green might take the plaudits when he comments on news that he deems as good but when council tax payers ask about who sanctioned the £200k "loan" to the Bulls or Omar Khan/Gerry Sutcliffe, he won't comment.
I'd like to also add independent "phone shops" to the list too. I think lvegate has five of them. Are they really phone shops or do they look like them. I'd better not say what l really think.
So Dave, see what you can do with the drunks and beggars situation then people might take you serious.
If the people coming by bus or train manage to get to the centre manage to avoid the beggars snd drunks then they might come back again if the place isn't mainly the typical chain shops. But the begging etc needs sorting out now and making begging in the city illegal. Then again drinking on the streets is illegal but not much gets done about that. The council and police always have a ready made answer "we don't have the resources to implement these measures to move them on" The central government funding for this isn't the only help offered, the rates are also helped if you employ a government funded apprentice. I bet they are sick of Bradford council going to them cap in hand after years of sham decisions by the council and whatever political persuasion they are. Years of idiotic decisions have made this city a laughing stock. Dave Green might take the plaudits when he comments on news that he deems as good but when council tax payers ask about who sanctioned the £200k "loan" to the Bulls or Omar Khan/Gerry Sutcliffe, he won't comment. I'd like to also add independent "phone shops" to the list too. I think lvegate has five of them. Are they really phone shops or do they look like them. I'd better not say what l really think. So Dave, see what you can do with the drunks and beggars situation then people might take you serious. Papa Smurfs Wig
  • Score: 9

12:59pm Wed 12 Mar 14

bd7 helper says...

Council tax is up to so who's paying "US"
Council tax is up to so who's paying "US" bd7 helper
  • Score: 4

2:04pm Wed 12 Mar 14

basil fawlty says...

I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.
I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down. basil fawlty
  • Score: 3

2:08pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Albion. says...

basil fawlty wrote:
I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.
Wakefield where they are considering closing the market after the Trinity was opened?
[quote][p][bold]basil fawlty[/bold] wrote: I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.[/p][/quote]Wakefield where they are considering closing the market after the Trinity was opened? Albion.
  • Score: 6

3:19pm Wed 12 Mar 14

alive and awake says...

Just been sick in a bucket looking at that picture of Green. Caption should read " Green Master of all he's ruined "
Just been sick in a bucket looking at that picture of Green. Caption should read " Green Master of all he's ruined " alive and awake
  • Score: -1

3:43pm Wed 12 Mar 14

JAtkinson says...

basil fawlty wrote:
I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.
Was surprised when a thoughtful, evenhanded, sensible post received a number of 'thumbs down' - then I re-read the first 10 words. Don't you know, Basil, that such language will not be tolerated on here? Tut tut.
[quote][p][bold]basil fawlty[/bold] wrote: I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.[/p][/quote]Was surprised when a thoughtful, evenhanded, sensible post received a number of 'thumbs down' - then I re-read the first 10 words. Don't you know, Basil, that such language will not be tolerated on here? Tut tut. JAtkinson
  • Score: 0

4:58pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Bantambhoy says...

No facility to comment on the vote rigging story!?
No facility to comment on the vote rigging story!? Bantambhoy
  • Score: 7

5:31pm Wed 12 Mar 14

basil fawlty says...

Albion. wrote:
basil fawlty wrote: I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.
Wakefield where they are considering closing the market after the Trinity was opened?
The indoor market is fairly new and replaced what was a larger indoor market elsewhere. But people don't seem to like the new one. I think the copuncil want to move the stall holders to a new outdoor market. This seems to be a mess up by the Council although they have done well in recent years with lots of regeneration going on including a new Westgate railway station, ongoing restoration of Kirkgate railway station, a new inner ring road, a new bus station and the new Trinity shopping centre. For a city one third the size of Bradford they have achieved far more.
[quote][p][bold]Albion.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]basil fawlty[/bold] wrote: I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.[/p][/quote]Wakefield where they are considering closing the market after the Trinity was opened?[/p][/quote]The indoor market is fairly new and replaced what was a larger indoor market elsewhere. But people don't seem to like the new one. I think the copuncil want to move the stall holders to a new outdoor market. This seems to be a mess up by the Council although they have done well in recent years with lots of regeneration going on including a new Westgate railway station, ongoing restoration of Kirkgate railway station, a new inner ring road, a new bus station and the new Trinity shopping centre. For a city one third the size of Bradford they have achieved far more. basil fawlty
  • Score: 0

5:47pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Albion. says...

basil fawlty wrote:
Albion. wrote:
basil fawlty wrote: I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.
Wakefield where they are considering closing the market after the Trinity was opened?
The indoor market is fairly new and replaced what was a larger indoor market elsewhere. But people don't seem to like the new one. I think the copuncil want to move the stall holders to a new outdoor market. This seems to be a mess up by the Council although they have done well in recent years with lots of regeneration going on including a new Westgate railway station, ongoing restoration of Kirkgate railway station, a new inner ring road, a new bus station and the new Trinity shopping centre. For a city one third the size of Bradford they have achieved far more.
Well the news items and interviews that I have seen all seem to blame Trinity for the market's demise.
[quote][p][bold]basil fawlty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Albion.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]basil fawlty[/bold] wrote: I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.[/p][/quote]Wakefield where they are considering closing the market after the Trinity was opened?[/p][/quote]The indoor market is fairly new and replaced what was a larger indoor market elsewhere. But people don't seem to like the new one. I think the copuncil want to move the stall holders to a new outdoor market. This seems to be a mess up by the Council although they have done well in recent years with lots of regeneration going on including a new Westgate railway station, ongoing restoration of Kirkgate railway station, a new inner ring road, a new bus station and the new Trinity shopping centre. For a city one third the size of Bradford they have achieved far more.[/p][/quote]Well the news items and interviews that I have seen all seem to blame Trinity for the market's demise. Albion.
  • Score: 1

6:07pm Wed 12 Mar 14

basil fawlty says...

Albion. wrote:
basil fawlty wrote:
Albion. wrote:
basil fawlty wrote: I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.
Wakefield where they are considering closing the market after the Trinity was opened?
The indoor market is fairly new and replaced what was a larger indoor market elsewhere. But people don't seem to like the new one. I think the copuncil want to move the stall holders to a new outdoor market. This seems to be a mess up by the Council although they have done well in recent years with lots of regeneration going on including a new Westgate railway station, ongoing restoration of Kirkgate railway station, a new inner ring road, a new bus station and the new Trinity shopping centre. For a city one third the size of Bradford they have achieved far more.
Well the news items and interviews that I have seen all seem to blame Trinity for the market's demise.
Trinity has got all the usual more up market fashion shops and cafes whilst the market has budget goods and tack. If you visit both you'll see they are like chalk and cheese. The old market never seemed to be very bust when I visited but at least it was a good size. I've heard locals comment that the new market is far too small and therefore not worth visiting. Apart from the failing market the streets around Trinity are now thriving. I don't know what the future is for markets but I would have thought the dozens of pound shops have stolen some of the trade away.
[quote][p][bold]Albion.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]basil fawlty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Albion.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]basil fawlty[/bold] wrote: I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.[/p][/quote]Wakefield where they are considering closing the market after the Trinity was opened?[/p][/quote]The indoor market is fairly new and replaced what was a larger indoor market elsewhere. But people don't seem to like the new one. I think the copuncil want to move the stall holders to a new outdoor market. This seems to be a mess up by the Council although they have done well in recent years with lots of regeneration going on including a new Westgate railway station, ongoing restoration of Kirkgate railway station, a new inner ring road, a new bus station and the new Trinity shopping centre. For a city one third the size of Bradford they have achieved far more.[/p][/quote]Well the news items and interviews that I have seen all seem to blame Trinity for the market's demise.[/p][/quote]Trinity has got all the usual more up market fashion shops and cafes whilst the market has budget goods and tack. If you visit both you'll see they are like chalk and cheese. The old market never seemed to be very bust when I visited but at least it was a good size. I've heard locals comment that the new market is far too small and therefore not worth visiting. Apart from the failing market the streets around Trinity are now thriving. I don't know what the future is for markets but I would have thought the dozens of pound shops have stolen some of the trade away. basil fawlty
  • Score: 1

6:09pm Wed 12 Mar 14

basil fawlty says...

ha ha bust = busy!
ha ha bust = busy! basil fawlty
  • Score: -1

6:18pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Albion. says...

basil fawlty wrote:
Albion. wrote:
basil fawlty wrote:
Albion. wrote:
basil fawlty wrote: I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.
Wakefield where they are considering closing the market after the Trinity was opened?
The indoor market is fairly new and replaced what was a larger indoor market elsewhere. But people don't seem to like the new one. I think the copuncil want to move the stall holders to a new outdoor market. This seems to be a mess up by the Council although they have done well in recent years with lots of regeneration going on including a new Westgate railway station, ongoing restoration of Kirkgate railway station, a new inner ring road, a new bus station and the new Trinity shopping centre. For a city one third the size of Bradford they have achieved far more.
Well the news items and interviews that I have seen all seem to blame Trinity for the market's demise.
Trinity has got all the usual more up market fashion shops and cafes whilst the market has budget goods and tack. If you visit both you'll see they are like chalk and cheese. The old market never seemed to be very bust when I visited but at least it was a good size. I've heard locals comment that the new market is far too small and therefore not worth visiting. Apart from the failing market the streets around Trinity are now thriving. I don't know what the future is for markets but I would have thought the dozens of pound shops have stolen some of the trade away.
I see! So everyone else is a liar.
[quote][p][bold]basil fawlty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Albion.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]basil fawlty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Albion.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]basil fawlty[/bold] wrote: I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.[/p][/quote]Wakefield where they are considering closing the market after the Trinity was opened?[/p][/quote]The indoor market is fairly new and replaced what was a larger indoor market elsewhere. But people don't seem to like the new one. I think the copuncil want to move the stall holders to a new outdoor market. This seems to be a mess up by the Council although they have done well in recent years with lots of regeneration going on including a new Westgate railway station, ongoing restoration of Kirkgate railway station, a new inner ring road, a new bus station and the new Trinity shopping centre. For a city one third the size of Bradford they have achieved far more.[/p][/quote]Well the news items and interviews that I have seen all seem to blame Trinity for the market's demise.[/p][/quote]Trinity has got all the usual more up market fashion shops and cafes whilst the market has budget goods and tack. If you visit both you'll see they are like chalk and cheese. The old market never seemed to be very bust when I visited but at least it was a good size. I've heard locals comment that the new market is far too small and therefore not worth visiting. Apart from the failing market the streets around Trinity are now thriving. I don't know what the future is for markets but I would have thought the dozens of pound shops have stolen some of the trade away.[/p][/quote]I see! So everyone else is a liar. Albion.
  • Score: -1

9:02pm Wed 12 Mar 14

lazybeat says...

this I an excellent idea and I hope things work well for the new city vision
this I an excellent idea and I hope things work well for the new city vision lazybeat
  • Score: 1

10:09pm Wed 12 Mar 14

notvery funny says...

basil fawlty wrote:
I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.
A £6 million loan from Bradford Council to developers McAleer & Rushe has enabled the flagship mixed-use Southgate development in Bradford city centre to be completed.
Construction has already started on the 1.2 acre Southgate site on the corner of Thornton Road and Godwin Street after Irish developers McAleer & Rushe secured two major pre-lets...

Did we ever get this loan back ... its just a question
[quote][p][bold]basil fawlty[/bold] wrote: I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.[/p][/quote]A £6 million loan from Bradford Council to developers McAleer & Rushe has enabled the flagship mixed-use Southgate development in Bradford city centre to be completed. Construction has already started on the 1.2 acre Southgate site on the corner of Thornton Road and Godwin Street after Irish developers McAleer & Rushe secured two major pre-lets... Did we ever get this loan back ... its just a question notvery funny
  • Score: -1

10:12pm Wed 12 Mar 14

notvery funny says...

notvery funny wrote:
basil fawlty wrote:
I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.
A £6 million loan from Bradford Council to developers McAleer & Rushe has enabled the flagship mixed-use Southgate development in Bradford city centre to be completed.
Construction has already started on the 1.2 acre Southgate site on the corner of Thornton Road and Godwin Street after Irish developers McAleer & Rushe secured two major pre-lets...

Did we ever get this loan back ... its just a question
http://www.thetelegr
aphandargus.co.uk/ne
ws/10384557.print/
[quote][p][bold]notvery funny[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]basil fawlty[/bold] wrote: I'm not wanting to be too critical of the council here but I would guess that the premises immediately next to the shopping centre will be in great demand anyway once we approach Broadway's opening. You can see that this has happened in Wakefield in the areas next to the Trinity shopping centre. The relaxation of planning rules would surely be of most benefit to the top end of town which is more remote from Broadway and is very run down.[/p][/quote]A £6 million loan from Bradford Council to developers McAleer & Rushe has enabled the flagship mixed-use Southgate development in Bradford city centre to be completed. Construction has already started on the 1.2 acre Southgate site on the corner of Thornton Road and Godwin Street after Irish developers McAleer & Rushe secured two major pre-lets... Did we ever get this loan back ... its just a question[/p][/quote]http://www.thetelegr aphandargus.co.uk/ne ws/10384557.print/ notvery funny
  • Score: -1

11:11pm Wed 12 Mar 14

BierleyBoy says...

JAtkinson wrote:
People will come to Bradford to go to Westfield... once. Making sure the journey from bus, train or car is interrupted by frequent shopping stops at decent, full outlets will make them come back.

I think it's a really, really good idea which will ensure the benefits of Westfield are maximised. However, if it remains as a plan, as so much does in Bradford, we'll get a fraction of the benefits.
Westfield is offering absolutely nothing that isn't readily available elsewhere. It's also going to be in a slum of a city centre.

There's also the fact that parking charges will be in place.

The rate relief is a great idea, note how Green is utterly unwilling to note that this is the key to filling empty spaces.

He would rather focus on the loosening of plans which will open up the opportunities for low rent, poor quality shops.

Allowing flats above them will create equally poor quality living spaces where there is no demand, they'll be full of benefit claimants and overcrowded.
[quote][p][bold]JAtkinson[/bold] wrote: People will come to Bradford to go to Westfield... once. Making sure the journey from bus, train or car is interrupted by frequent shopping stops at decent, full outlets will make them come back. I think it's a really, really good idea which will ensure the benefits of Westfield are maximised. However, if it remains as a plan, as so much does in Bradford, we'll get a fraction of the benefits.[/p][/quote]Westfield is offering absolutely nothing that isn't readily available elsewhere. It's also going to be in a slum of a city centre. There's also the fact that parking charges will be in place. The rate relief is a great idea, note how Green is utterly unwilling to note that this is the key to filling empty spaces. He would rather focus on the loosening of plans which will open up the opportunities for low rent, poor quality shops. Allowing flats above them will create equally poor quality living spaces where there is no demand, they'll be full of benefit claimants and overcrowded. BierleyBoy
  • Score: -1

8:41pm Wed 2 Apr 14

angela2691 says...

Since we lost Rawson Market Bradford city centre hasn't had much in the way of places to buy fresh food such as meat, fish, fruit and vegetables without having to resort to using the likes of Morrisons, Aldi and Tesco. What I would like to see now that the bottom end of the city is now being redeveloped is maybe a fresh food market, possibly located in the area along Broadway (near Bon Marche, HMV & Greggs) and Charles Street, where local produce could be purchased.
Since we lost Rawson Market Bradford city centre hasn't had much in the way of places to buy fresh food such as meat, fish, fruit and vegetables without having to resort to using the likes of Morrisons, Aldi and Tesco. What I would like to see now that the bottom end of the city is now being redeveloped is maybe a fresh food market, possibly located in the area along Broadway (near Bon Marche, HMV & Greggs) and Charles Street, where local produce could be purchased. angela2691
  • Score: 0

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