Concern at plans to move dementia care ward from Airedale Hospital to Lynfield Mount in Bradford

Airedale Hospital

Airedale Hospital

First published in News
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Plans to shift a specialist dementia care ward from Airedale Hospital to Bradford have come under attack.

Bradford District Care Trust wants to move Ward 24 to Lynfield Mount Hospital, in Daisy Hill, Bradford.

The Reverend David Griffiths, chairman of the Ward 24 Carers Action Group, said: “The care trust is doing its job and trying to save money, but moving this to Bradford will mean people in the North of our catchment area having to catch five buses for a 65-mile round trip.”

The move is also opposed by Bradford councillors Adrian Farley (Lab, Keighley West) and Doreen Lee (Lab, Keighley East).

Coun Lee said: “We’re extremely concerned. This is our only elderly ward in the area for people with acute dementia. How will their relatives get to Lynfield?”

She said there would be a day of action outside Keighley Market Hall on March 1, where people will be asked to sign a petition against the re-location.

Nicola Lees, deputy chief executive at Bradford District Care Trust, said: “Moving Ward 24 to a purpose-built facility at Lynfield Mount Hospital by spring 2015 is part of our wider plan to transform older people’s care.

“The new unit will provide 22 private bedrooms with some en-suite facilities and will offer a bespoke space for people living with this condition.

“This means we can provide higher quality care, in the best possible environment.”

She emphasised the re-location was not about cutting costs.

“We estimate we will save around £300,000 in current leasing arrangements, and some of this money will be re-invested into improving staffing levels in both our in-patient wards and community services,” she added.

“We understand that for some an in-patient stay is the only option.

“Where this is the case and re-location has an impact, we can confirm we will support carers and families to visit their loved ones.”

Keighley MP Kris Hopkins said: “I’m afraid this has the feel of a negotiating position on the part of Bradford District Care Trust, although I hope I’m wrong.

“I’ve written to the trust chair to seek his views.

“I would certainly not wish to see my constituents having to travel into Bradford for access to this care.”

Comments (3)

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8:04am Thu 30 Jan 14

RollandSmoke says...

Whilst I have the greatest respect for the work done at Lynfield Mount I feel that caring for elderly dementia patients alongside people with severe psychiatric problems is not a good idea. I'm aware that dementia is classed as a mental illness but the treatment for it is very different from the treatment of psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia and psychosis. I worry that people visiting their elderly relatives in their latter stages of life would find the place intimidating if indeed they can get there.
Whilst I have the greatest respect for the work done at Lynfield Mount I feel that caring for elderly dementia patients alongside people with severe psychiatric problems is not a good idea. I'm aware that dementia is classed as a mental illness but the treatment for it is very different from the treatment of psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia and psychosis. I worry that people visiting their elderly relatives in their latter stages of life would find the place intimidating if indeed they can get there. RollandSmoke
  • Score: 2

9:18am Thu 30 Jan 14

A650 says...

The Adults Mental Health Wards and Older Peoples Mental Health Wards will be totally separate wards. There won't be any "mixing" of patients "alongside" each other. In most cases adult and older people wards are locked anyway apart from those that house the patients in recovery or deemed not to be a threat to themselves or others. These places aren't the intimidating asylums of old and most Mental Health trusts treat a variety of patients with a variety of conditions on the same site but in separate facilties.

However, I can understand the concerns of relatives who'd be faced with the a mammoth journey from North Yorkshire through to Lynfield Mount, particularly those who don't have cars.
The Adults Mental Health Wards and Older Peoples Mental Health Wards will be totally separate wards. There won't be any "mixing" of patients "alongside" each other. In most cases adult and older people wards are locked anyway apart from those that house the patients in recovery or deemed not to be a threat to themselves or others. These places aren't the intimidating asylums of old and most Mental Health trusts treat a variety of patients with a variety of conditions on the same site but in separate facilties. However, I can understand the concerns of relatives who'd be faced with the a mammoth journey from North Yorkshire through to Lynfield Mount, particularly those who don't have cars. A650
  • Score: 4

7:53am Sat 1 Feb 14

mrshlp says...

In the vast majority of cases, patients use these units until alternative arrangements for their care can be arranged so they tend to provide short term care and assessment services. That said any more to take vulnerable, elderly people away from their community is misguided. Whilst hospitals are so stretched, they need family members and friends to be able to visit and make sure that person is fit and well and voice any concerns. If you make that more difficult then you put people at risk. Another point to consider is stigmatisation and labelling. If you start putting elderly people in psychiatric hospitals, even if they are totally separate wards, then you start saying they have a mental illness and then they are subject to the same stigma as psychiatric patients. This is something a lot of elderly people find very distressing in my experience. The stigma psychiatric patients have to put up with is horrendous anyway and totally wrong BUT if you are elderly and have set views and end up in a psychiatric hospital and you think everyone in there is going to be an axe murderer you can see why they might end up totally terrified. I was a care worker for a long time and cared for my Grandmother who had dementia as well has having to visit my grandfather in a psychiatric ward when his dementia went out of control and my gran could no longer cope.
In the vast majority of cases, patients use these units until alternative arrangements for their care can be arranged so they tend to provide short term care and assessment services. That said any more to take vulnerable, elderly people away from their community is misguided. Whilst hospitals are so stretched, they need family members and friends to be able to visit and make sure that person is fit and well and voice any concerns. If you make that more difficult then you put people at risk. Another point to consider is stigmatisation and labelling. If you start putting elderly people in psychiatric hospitals, even if they are totally separate wards, then you start saying they have a mental illness and then they are subject to the same stigma as psychiatric patients. This is something a lot of elderly people find very distressing in my experience. The stigma psychiatric patients have to put up with is horrendous anyway and totally wrong BUT if you are elderly and have set views and end up in a psychiatric hospital and you think everyone in there is going to be an axe murderer you can see why they might end up totally terrified. I was a care worker for a long time and cared for my Grandmother who had dementia as well has having to visit my grandfather in a psychiatric ward when his dementia went out of control and my gran could no longer cope. mrshlp
  • Score: 0

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