Charging points for electric cars to be set up in district

An electric Nissan Leaf being trialled by Bradford Council in June 2011.

An electric Nissan Leaf being trialled by Bradford Council in June 2011.

First published in News Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Photograph of the Author by , City Hall Reporter

Hi-tech charging points for electric cars are a step closer to being installed across West Yorkshire.

The £475,000 scheme by transport authority Metro will see 14 charging points placed across the county, with Bradford due to get two of them.

They are expected to be placed at the Shell petrol station at Bradford’s Staygate roundabout off the M606 and at the Shell petrol station in Hardings Road, Keighley.

There are also likely to be other charge points installed along the M62 motorway.

Detailed site investigations have now started and Metro is talking to landowners and the network operator to find out how much it will cost to install charge points at each site and how much power will be required.

The chargers themselves would be ‘rapid’ points, which take only 30 minutes to charge a vehicle.

These were deemed preferable to the ‘slow’ points, which use a standard 13 amp supply, and can take up to eight hours for a full charge.

Metro’s Bradford spokesman, Councillor Imran Khan, said to start off with, each site would get one charging point, but it was hoped that these would be added to over time.

He said the charge points, once installed, should encourage people to take up the greener vehicles by alleviating the worry that they might run out of power during a long journey.

He said: “The cost of petrol is going through the roof as it is, and we are hoping more and more people will come on to these cars. It has the knock-on effect of being environmentally friendly as well.”

Coun Khan said the details about how people would pay for the power they used were yet to be decided, but it was likely to involve a machine where people paid by credit or debit card.

Transport bosses successfully applied for a £345,000 grant towards the project from the Government's Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV). Metro then put forward £125,000 of its own money.

The cash has to be spent by the end of March 2015, and a new report says the project is on schedule to be completed by then.

The report will be discussed by Metro’s Bradford Passenger Consultative Committee on Monday.

Comments (9)

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6:24am Mon 20 Jan 14

Joedavid says...

Is this tax payers money?
Is this tax payers money? Joedavid
  • Score: 1

6:52am Mon 20 Jan 14

Albion. says...

Joedavid wrote:
Is this tax payers money?
"Transport bosses successfully applied for a £345,000 grant towards the project from the Government's Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV). Metro then put forward £125,000 of its own money."

Yes.
[quote][p][bold]Joedavid[/bold] wrote: Is this tax payers money?[/p][/quote]"Transport bosses successfully applied for a £345,000 grant towards the project from the Government's Office for Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV). Metro then put forward £125,000 of its own money." Yes. Albion.
  • Score: 2

7:04am Mon 20 Jan 14

GAMEKEEPER1809 says...

Another complete waste of money. Half an hour on fast charge, only two chargers in this area, credit/debit card payments. These cars, last I heard only have a range of 100 miles at best, so a journey of 90 miles that would take 2 hours would take 2 1/2 hours? Or do the journey, then have to wait until the following day to return, using a trickle charger.
Another complete waste of money. Half an hour on fast charge, only two chargers in this area, credit/debit card payments. These cars, last I heard only have a range of 100 miles at best, so a journey of 90 miles that would take 2 hours would take 2 1/2 hours? Or do the journey, then have to wait until the following day to return, using a trickle charger. GAMEKEEPER1809
  • Score: 2

8:53am Mon 20 Jan 14

Steve30d says...

Interested to know what the long term plan is to allow the bulk of people electric cars. Unless the charging takes less than 10 minutes, that's a fair bit of land that's gonna need to be turned into glorified parking spaces.
Probably OK for people who have a garages to put their car into at home or a works car park with charge points- but for everyone else it'll need to be cables draped over the pavement, triping up pedestrians, or forcing them (including children and the elderly) to walk in the roads. That's also assuming the cables don't get nicked, which is bound to happen. Still don't know what the issue would be with swap out batteries- *If* the electric car industry would get their act together and agree on astandard form factors for these large batteries (something like 2 ft cubes might work?) I know batteries are claimed to wear out, but surely it would still just a case of measuring how much it takes to recharge a "returned" battery, and paying for what it takes to restore the battery to full charge. Needn't be much different from what happens with large gas bottles. If a use profile was provided on return, and there was a maximum charge that could be charged for certain use profiles then the rechargers would soon get rid of any duff batteries.
Interested to know what the long term plan is to allow the bulk of people electric cars. Unless the charging takes less than 10 minutes, that's a fair bit of land that's gonna need to be turned into glorified parking spaces. Probably OK for people who have a garages to put their car into at home or a works car park with charge points- but for everyone else it'll need to be cables draped over the pavement, triping up pedestrians, or forcing them (including children and the elderly) to walk in the roads. That's also assuming the cables don't get nicked, which is bound to happen. Still don't know what the issue would be with swap out batteries- *If* the electric car industry would get their act together and agree on astandard form factors for these large batteries (something like 2 ft cubes might work?) I know batteries are claimed to wear out, but surely it would still just a case of measuring how much it takes to recharge a "returned" battery, and paying for what it takes to restore the battery to full charge. Needn't be much different from what happens with large gas bottles. If a use profile was provided on return, and there was a maximum charge that could be charged for certain use profiles then the rechargers would soon get rid of any duff batteries. Steve30d
  • Score: -2

9:01am Mon 20 Jan 14

bd7 helper says...

Another way to make money once again
Another way to make money once again bd7 helper
  • Score: -4

4:17pm Mon 20 Jan 14

BierleyBoy says...

Laughable stuff. How much is the cheapest electric car? How many are in Bradford? Why put a charging point at this garage?

Bradford Council is apparently very worried about air quality, yet none of it's staff drive electric cars, none of it's vehicles are electric and there are no charging points in the city centre.

Much easier to slap fines on motorists to raise money.......
Laughable stuff. How much is the cheapest electric car? How many are in Bradford? Why put a charging point at this garage? Bradford Council is apparently very worried about air quality, yet none of it's staff drive electric cars, none of it's vehicles are electric and there are no charging points in the city centre. Much easier to slap fines on motorists to raise money....... BierleyBoy
  • Score: 0

5:12pm Mon 20 Jan 14

linebacker2 says...

BierleyBoy wrote:
Laughable stuff. How much is the cheapest electric car? How many are in Bradford? Why put a charging point at this garage?

Bradford Council is apparently very worried about air quality, yet none of it's staff drive electric cars, none of it's vehicles are electric and there are no charging points in the city centre.

Much easier to slap fines on motorists to raise money.......
Bit chicken and egg though isn't it?
[quote][p][bold]BierleyBoy[/bold] wrote: Laughable stuff. How much is the cheapest electric car? How many are in Bradford? Why put a charging point at this garage? Bradford Council is apparently very worried about air quality, yet none of it's staff drive electric cars, none of it's vehicles are electric and there are no charging points in the city centre. Much easier to slap fines on motorists to raise money.......[/p][/quote]Bit chicken and egg though isn't it? linebacker2
  • Score: 3

10:28pm Mon 20 Jan 14

JPWhiteHome says...

Steve30d wrote:
Interested to know what the long term plan is to allow the bulk of people electric cars. Unless the charging takes less than 10 minutes, that's a fair bit of land that's gonna need to be turned into glorified parking spaces.
Probably OK for people who have a garages to put their car into at home or a works car park with charge points- but for everyone else it'll need to be cables draped over the pavement, triping up pedestrians, or forcing them (including children and the elderly) to walk in the roads. That's also assuming the cables don't get nicked, which is bound to happen. Still don't know what the issue would be with swap out batteries- *If* the electric car industry would get their act together and agree on astandard form factors for these large batteries (something like 2 ft cubes might work?) I know batteries are claimed to wear out, but surely it would still just a case of measuring how much it takes to recharge a "returned" battery, and paying for what it takes to restore the battery to full charge. Needn't be much different from what happens with large gas bottles. If a use profile was provided on return, and there was a maximum charge that could be charged for certain use profiles then the rechargers would soon get rid of any duff batteries.
Battery swap stations were setup by Better Place thanks to a 840 Million Dollar grant. They went bust.

On paper battery swap seems an obvious solution. In practice its not ready for prime time.

I don't see manufacturers agreeing on a standard shape, never mind a standard chemistry for batteries. Great idea, problem is that dog won't hunt.
[quote][p][bold]Steve30d[/bold] wrote: Interested to know what the long term plan is to allow the bulk of people electric cars. Unless the charging takes less than 10 minutes, that's a fair bit of land that's gonna need to be turned into glorified parking spaces. Probably OK for people who have a garages to put their car into at home or a works car park with charge points- but for everyone else it'll need to be cables draped over the pavement, triping up pedestrians, or forcing them (including children and the elderly) to walk in the roads. That's also assuming the cables don't get nicked, which is bound to happen. Still don't know what the issue would be with swap out batteries- *If* the electric car industry would get their act together and agree on astandard form factors for these large batteries (something like 2 ft cubes might work?) I know batteries are claimed to wear out, but surely it would still just a case of measuring how much it takes to recharge a "returned" battery, and paying for what it takes to restore the battery to full charge. Needn't be much different from what happens with large gas bottles. If a use profile was provided on return, and there was a maximum charge that could be charged for certain use profiles then the rechargers would soon get rid of any duff batteries.[/p][/quote]Battery swap stations were setup by Better Place thanks to a 840 Million Dollar grant. They went bust. On paper battery swap seems an obvious solution. In practice its not ready for prime time. I don't see manufacturers agreeing on a standard shape, never mind a standard chemistry for batteries. Great idea, problem is that dog won't hunt. JPWhiteHome
  • Score: 2

8:32am Tue 21 Jan 14

Steve30d says...

JPWhiteHome wrote:
Steve30d wrote:
Interested to know what the long term plan is to allow the bulk of people electric cars. Unless the charging takes less than 10 minutes, that's a fair bit of land that's gonna need to be turned into glorified parking spaces.
Probably OK for people who have a garages to put their car into at home or a works car park with charge points- but for everyone else it'll need to be cables draped over the pavement, triping up pedestrians, or forcing them (including children and the elderly) to walk in the roads. That's also assuming the cables don't get nicked, which is bound to happen. Still don't know what the issue would be with swap out batteries- *If* the electric car industry would get their act together and agree on astandard form factors for these large batteries (something like 2 ft cubes might work?) I know batteries are claimed to wear out, but surely it would still just a case of measuring how much it takes to recharge a "returned" battery, and paying for what it takes to restore the battery to full charge. Needn't be much different from what happens with large gas bottles. If a use profile was provided on return, and there was a maximum charge that could be charged for certain use profiles then the rechargers would soon get rid of any duff batteries.
Battery swap stations were setup by Better Place thanks to a 840 Million Dollar grant. They went bust.

On paper battery swap seems an obvious solution. In practice its not ready for prime time.

I don't see manufacturers agreeing on a standard shape, never mind a standard chemistry for batteries. Great idea, problem is that dog won't hunt.
Thanks for that info I hadn't heard of Better Place at all.
Chemistry needn't be much of a problem. Surely electric cars have DC-DC convertors already to handle change in road speed and for regenerative breaking. So long as the battery voltage was within range it could convert to what the car's motors needed.
Do agree about standardisation though. That needs for several manufactures to get together and agree on it. Not gonna happen until several see they're not gonna corner the market.
[quote][p][bold]JPWhiteHome[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Steve30d[/bold] wrote: Interested to know what the long term plan is to allow the bulk of people electric cars. Unless the charging takes less than 10 minutes, that's a fair bit of land that's gonna need to be turned into glorified parking spaces. Probably OK for people who have a garages to put their car into at home or a works car park with charge points- but for everyone else it'll need to be cables draped over the pavement, triping up pedestrians, or forcing them (including children and the elderly) to walk in the roads. That's also assuming the cables don't get nicked, which is bound to happen. Still don't know what the issue would be with swap out batteries- *If* the electric car industry would get their act together and agree on astandard form factors for these large batteries (something like 2 ft cubes might work?) I know batteries are claimed to wear out, but surely it would still just a case of measuring how much it takes to recharge a "returned" battery, and paying for what it takes to restore the battery to full charge. Needn't be much different from what happens with large gas bottles. If a use profile was provided on return, and there was a maximum charge that could be charged for certain use profiles then the rechargers would soon get rid of any duff batteries.[/p][/quote]Battery swap stations were setup by Better Place thanks to a 840 Million Dollar grant. They went bust. On paper battery swap seems an obvious solution. In practice its not ready for prime time. I don't see manufacturers agreeing on a standard shape, never mind a standard chemistry for batteries. Great idea, problem is that dog won't hunt.[/p][/quote]Thanks for that info I hadn't heard of Better Place at all. Chemistry needn't be much of a problem. Surely electric cars have DC-DC convertors already to handle change in road speed and for regenerative breaking. So long as the battery voltage was within range it could convert to what the car's motors needed. Do agree about standardisation though. That needs for several manufactures to get together and agree on it. Not gonna happen until several see they're not gonna corner the market. Steve30d
  • Score: 0

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