ChildLine volunteers to spread the word about the dangers of the web

The NSPCC is to visit Bradford schools warning about internet dangers

The NSPCC is to visit Bradford schools warning about internet dangers

First published in News

Children’s charity ChildLine will be visiting every primary school in Bradford to warn of the dangers of the internet, including children being groomed online, as the NSPCC today warned of an e-safety ‘timebomb’.

Today is Safer Internet Day, and the NSPCC revealed that its latest research, including calls to ChildLine and focus groups with young children, has shown that abuse via the internet and mobile phones is “beyond doubt one of the major child protection issues facing young people today”.

They found that so called ‘sexting’ and hard-core pornography were now the norm for many teenagers, with focus groups describing it as so common, it was “mundane”, with youngsters being blackmailed into sending indecent images to strangers or peers, and cyber bullying.

They described a new generation of social media applications opening up a Pandora’s box of potential danger.

Claire Lilley, safer technology lead at the NSPCC, said: “Young people tell us they are experiencing all sorts of new forms of abuse on a scale never before seen.

“It’s now clear that we are facing an e-safety timebomb with this being one of the biggest child protection issues of our time.

“The internet and mobile phones are now part and parcel of young people’s everyday lives. They are the first generation who have never known a world without them.

“We cannot put the genie back in the bottle but we can talk to our children about this issue.

“The theme of this year’s Safer Internet Day is online ‘rights and responsibilities’; we need to help young people find the balance between the two.”

ChildLine carried out 3,745 counselling sessions last year about these issues, with most callers aged between 12 and 15.

Councillor Ralph Berry, Bradford Council’s executive member responsible for children’s cervices, said he welcomed the news that ChildLine would be visiting every school in the district.

“We have bought into a sofware programme which looks at e-safety and social media and go through the children’s and parents responsibilities.”

The ChildLine Schools Service is looking to recruit around 25 volunteers in Bradford to reach 186 schools and more than 56,600 children in three years. Visit nspcc.org.uk/schoolsservice if you are interested in volunteering.

Parents with concerns can contact the NSPCC on 0808 8005000 or ChildLine on 0800 1111 and at childline.org.uk for children and young people.

Comments (6)

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8:28am Tue 5 Feb 13

Joedavid says...

What ages and maturity are they going to talk to?
It says primary schools above, would have thought it should be secondary schools myself.
The talks also should be given to all parents to make them aware as they probably think my child is not seeing that.
I hope this scheme as been well thought through and doesn't have children going looking on the internet when told they should not.
What ages and maturity are they going to talk to? It says primary schools above, would have thought it should be secondary schools myself. The talks also should be given to all parents to make them aware as they probably think my child is not seeing that. I hope this scheme as been well thought through and doesn't have children going looking on the internet when told they should not. Joedavid
  • Score: 0

8:47am Tue 5 Feb 13

Joedavid says...

Amazing the connections these internet sites like this one have to other sites.
My Twitter account as just received a Tweet from someone not following me or being followed by me no Twitter connection in anyway and it answers my above question...... 5 years old.
www.bbc.co.uk/news/e
ducation-21328411
My twitter name and name here are different.
Amazing the connections these internet sites like this one have to other sites. My Twitter account as just received a Tweet from someone not following me or being followed by me no Twitter connection in anyway and it answers my above question...... 5 years old. www.bbc.co.uk/news/e ducation-21328411 My twitter name and name here are different. Joedavid
  • Score: 0

11:12am Tue 5 Feb 13

Albion. says...

It does no harm to enhance awareness from time to time, and point out the hidden dangers and how potential abusers go about things, the responsibility however, is with the schools and above all parents, to use the existing measures to prevent children from visiting inappropriate sites and to protect them from abuse. The days of "oh the kids know more than the parents" should be long gone, if the parents are unable to make the device safe, the children shouldn't be using it.
It does no harm to enhance awareness from time to time, and point out the hidden dangers and how potential abusers go about things, the responsibility however, is with the schools and above all parents, to use the existing measures to prevent children from visiting inappropriate sites and to protect them from abuse. The days of "oh the kids know more than the parents" should be long gone, if the parents are unable to make the device safe, the children shouldn't be using it. Albion.
  • Score: 0

12:34pm Tue 5 Feb 13

Andy2010 says...

Albion. wrote:
It does no harm to enhance awareness from time to time, and point out the hidden dangers and how potential abusers go about things, the responsibility however, is with the schools and above all parents, to use the existing measures to prevent children from visiting inappropriate sites and to protect them from abuse. The days of "oh the kids know more than the parents" should be long gone, if the parents are unable to make the device safe, the children shouldn't be using it.
This ^^

What happened to parental responsibility. There are numerous programs that can monitor or restrict online interactions
[quote][p][bold]Albion.[/bold] wrote: It does no harm to enhance awareness from time to time, and point out the hidden dangers and how potential abusers go about things, the responsibility however, is with the schools and above all parents, to use the existing measures to prevent children from visiting inappropriate sites and to protect them from abuse. The days of "oh the kids know more than the parents" should be long gone, if the parents are unable to make the device safe, the children shouldn't be using it.[/p][/quote]This ^^ What happened to parental responsibility. There are numerous programs that can monitor or restrict online interactions Andy2010
  • Score: 0

2:00pm Tue 5 Feb 13

The Hoffster says...

The parents of children nowadays are on average in their late 20s, early 30s.

If they don't know how to monitor their kids' activities online, then they're a miserable failure.
The parents of children nowadays are on average in their late 20s, early 30s. If they don't know how to monitor their kids' activities online, then they're a miserable failure. The Hoffster
  • Score: 0

4:11pm Tue 5 Feb 13

RollandSmoke says...

You arn't supposed to be able to sign up on sites like facebook until you are 13 but there seems to be no policing of this policy. Even the grown ups struggle to understand the complexities of the ever changing privacy and security settings and I know to my detriment that it only takes one malicious person to look at your facebook page and they will gain a multitude of snippets of information that they will use in cyber bulling/stalking against you.
You arn't supposed to be able to sign up on sites like facebook until you are 13 but there seems to be no policing of this policy. Even the grown ups struggle to understand the complexities of the ever changing privacy and security settings and I know to my detriment that it only takes one malicious person to look at your facebook page and they will gain a multitude of snippets of information that they will use in cyber bulling/stalking against you. RollandSmoke
  • Score: 0

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