Bradford dad says he feels so strongly about state education in the city he borrows from family and friends to pay for children’s private education

Bradford Telegraph and Argus: FLOURISHING: Raheem, left, and Haider Hussain. Below, yesterday’s front page FLOURISHING: Raheem, left, and Haider Hussain. Below, yesterday’s front page

A father of three has spoken of how he has had to borrow money in order to put his children through a private education after “losing faith” in Bradford’s state schools.

Zahir Hussain said he had been paying about £1,000 a month to pay for a private primary school for two of this boys and a private creche for his youngest son.

The 30-year-old field services technician said he had been left disappointed with the level of education he felt his children were getting in a state primary, but had noticed a big improvement in the behaviour and attitude of Raheem Hussain, eight, and Haider Hussain, ten, since they began attending the independent Netherleigh and Rossefield School, in Heaton, this year.

The Telegraph & Argus reported yesterday that Bradford’s secondary schools have been judged by schools watchdog Ofsted to be the second worst in the country.

Mr Hussain said: “I’m from Manningham and my kids used to go to a state school, I just lost all faith in the state schools so I put my kids in a private school now.

“I’m just a normal working guy, I have an average salary, and I pay £800 towards the private school fees.”

Mr Hussain said he was also paying £200 a month for his two-year-old son Zidane Hussain to go to a private creche.

He said he had borrowed money from friends and family to help pay for the children’s education, but expected to have save between £40,000 and £50,000 to fund their way through school in the future.

He said he was left disappointed with the standards of teaching in the state primary school. He said: “It was the level of education – my kids didn’t even know their times tables.

“I tried to get some private tutoring from a few of my friends who live outside the Bradford district.

“They said they are so poor they are not even at level two and they should be at level three and four.

Mr Hussain said he also had regular conversations with the headmistress, constant feedback and one-to-ones with staff.

Councillor Ralph Berry, Bradford Council’s executive member for children’s services, said: “I’m sorry to hear he has not felt able to raise that issue with that school and I would be very happy to look into that.

“The primary education in Bradford has been showing very significant improvement, we have growing numbers of schools with god Ofsted judgements, in the recent Ofsted table we were sixth out of 15 in Yorkshire and the Humber and rising.

“We are making every effort but it takes the community, parents and the school to educate a child and if there has been a breakdown in that relationship, I certainly would like to know about it and look into it because this is not a desirable outcome.”

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