Don't clog up A&E with minor complaints' plea by doctors

Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Staff at Bradford Royal Informary A&E department Staff at Bradford Royal Informary A&E department

A&E doctors in Bradford and Airedale are urging patients across the district to stop and think before they seek emergency care this winter.

Staff in Airedale’s A&E department can see more than 200 people a day and at Bradford Royal Infirmary in excess of 400 patients are seen on a busy day – many who do not need hospital care.

Now with winter dramatically increasing pressure on hospital services, doctors are urging patients with minor illnesses and injuries to seek help from their GP, local pharmacist, or even treat themselves with first aid and basic self-care.

Dr Alexandra Danecki, consultant in emergency medicine for Airedale NHS Foundation Trust, said: “It’s in the name – A&E is for accident and emergency cases only, such as severe chest pain, difficulty breathing, significant head injuries and broken bones.

“Some people who come to our A&E should have gone for treatment elsewhere. Some of these could have gone to see their GP but they thought their problem was too urgent to wait or their local surgery was closed.

“We are not a shortcut to specialist referrals – if a case is not an emergency it will be referred back to the GP. Patients perhaps don’t realise that their GP may have more experience than the doctor who sees them in A&E in areas such as skin rashes. Our expertise is management of emergency conditions; not on-going care of chronic problems.”

The NHS Choose Well campaign spells out the options for getting routine, urgent and out-of-hours healthcare and the effect that inappropriate use of NHS services can have on those people who really need emergency care.

Dr Georgina Haslam, urgent care lead at NHS Airedale, Bradford and Leeds, said: “It’s always important for patients to choose the most appropriate treatment for their illness so that emergency healthcare is only used by those people who need it.

“West Yorkshire Urgent Care Services can advise people with unexpected or worsening health conditions and there are a range of other services, including pharmacies and GP practices, which can also help. A&E departments aren’t for anything and everything – they are very busy and should only be used in serious or life-threatening situations. Choosing well not only helps to ease the pressure on hospital A&E departments but it means patients can get faster access to the services they really need.”

Jonathan Taylor, pharmacist at Carleton-In-Craven Pharmacy, near Skipton, added: “Your pharmacy is not just a place to simply pick up medicines, we are happy to give you advice on how to use them properly and possible side-effects. You can also talk to us, without an appointment, about common health problems and we will tell you if we think you need to see a doctor.”

A dvd called Right Time, Right Place produced by NHS Airedale, Bradford and Leeds is online at airedale-trust.nhs.uk showing what each NHS service does and when it should be used. For more information about winter health and Choose well visit: bradford.nhs.uk/your-health/choose-well

Comments (10)

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10:07am Wed 14 Nov 12

The Legion says...

Now this is amusing.... we now have a PCT that doesn't know what the left hand is doing. GPs are getting harder and harder to see. If they want less "small" cases turning up at hospitals then budget for more GPs. Simple, the fact they have to report this article in the first place should ring alarm bells. Obviously there are people who made the wrong choice but most is now out of "I can't go anywhere else" some people do have great GPs who are very easy to see, but most don't. Sort that out first instead of blaming the public.
Now this is amusing.... we now have a PCT that doesn't know what the left hand is doing. GPs are getting harder and harder to see. If they want less "small" cases turning up at hospitals then budget for more GPs. Simple, the fact they have to report this article in the first place should ring alarm bells. Obviously there are people who made the wrong choice but most is now out of "I can't go anywhere else" some people do have great GPs who are very easy to see, but most don't. Sort that out first instead of blaming the public. The Legion
  • Score: 0

11:28am Wed 14 Nov 12

Albion. says...

The Legion wrote:
Now this is amusing.... we now have a PCT that doesn't know what the left hand is doing. GPs are getting harder and harder to see. If they want less "small" cases turning up at hospitals then budget for more GPs. Simple, the fact they have to report this article in the first place should ring alarm bells. Obviously there are people who made the wrong choice but most is now out of "I can't go anywhere else" some people do have great GPs who are very easy to see, but most don't. Sort that out first instead of blaming the public.
A filtering system could work, turn people away rather than complaining because they turned up, anyone failing a breathe test should either be turned away or locked in a drunk cell for twelve hours.
[quote][p][bold]The Legion[/bold] wrote: Now this is amusing.... we now have a PCT that doesn't know what the left hand is doing. GPs are getting harder and harder to see. If they want less "small" cases turning up at hospitals then budget for more GPs. Simple, the fact they have to report this article in the first place should ring alarm bells. Obviously there are people who made the wrong choice but most is now out of "I can't go anywhere else" some people do have great GPs who are very easy to see, but most don't. Sort that out first instead of blaming the public.[/p][/quote]A filtering system could work, turn people away rather than complaining because they turned up, anyone failing a breathe test should either be turned away or locked in a drunk cell for twelve hours. Albion.
  • Score: 0

12:09pm Wed 14 Nov 12

pellethead says...

Albion. wrote:
The Legion wrote:
Now this is amusing.... we now have a PCT that doesn't know what the left hand is doing. GPs are getting harder and harder to see. If they want less "small" cases turning up at hospitals then budget for more GPs. Simple, the fact they have to report this article in the first place should ring alarm bells. Obviously there are people who made the wrong choice but most is now out of "I can't go anywhere else" some people do have great GPs who are very easy to see, but most don't. Sort that out first instead of blaming the public.
A filtering system could work, turn people away rather than complaining because they turned up, anyone failing a breathe test should either be turned away or locked in a drunk cell for twelve hours.
So someone who attends A &E with a broken wrist,leg or worse should be turned away. utter nonsense
[quote][p][bold]Albion.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Legion[/bold] wrote: Now this is amusing.... we now have a PCT that doesn't know what the left hand is doing. GPs are getting harder and harder to see. If they want less "small" cases turning up at hospitals then budget for more GPs. Simple, the fact they have to report this article in the first place should ring alarm bells. Obviously there are people who made the wrong choice but most is now out of "I can't go anywhere else" some people do have great GPs who are very easy to see, but most don't. Sort that out first instead of blaming the public.[/p][/quote]A filtering system could work, turn people away rather than complaining because they turned up, anyone failing a breathe test should either be turned away or locked in a drunk cell for twelve hours.[/p][/quote]So someone who attends A &E with a broken wrist,leg or worse should be turned away. utter nonsense pellethead
  • Score: 0

12:10pm Wed 14 Nov 12

pellethead says...

pellethead wrote:
Albion. wrote:
The Legion wrote:
Now this is amusing.... we now have a PCT that doesn't know what the left hand is doing. GPs are getting harder and harder to see. If they want less "small" cases turning up at hospitals then budget for more GPs. Simple, the fact they have to report this article in the first place should ring alarm bells. Obviously there are people who made the wrong choice but most is now out of "I can't go anywhere else" some people do have great GPs who are very easy to see, but most don't. Sort that out first instead of blaming the public.
A filtering system could work, turn people away rather than complaining because they turned up, anyone failing a breathe test should either be turned away or locked in a drunk cell for twelve hours.
So someone who attends A &E with a broken wrist,leg or worse should be turned away. utter nonsense
i meant to say someone who attends A &E "drunk" with a broken wrist,leg or worse should be turned away. utter nonsense
[quote][p][bold]pellethead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Albion.[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Legion[/bold] wrote: Now this is amusing.... we now have a PCT that doesn't know what the left hand is doing. GPs are getting harder and harder to see. If they want less "small" cases turning up at hospitals then budget for more GPs. Simple, the fact they have to report this article in the first place should ring alarm bells. Obviously there are people who made the wrong choice but most is now out of "I can't go anywhere else" some people do have great GPs who are very easy to see, but most don't. Sort that out first instead of blaming the public.[/p][/quote]A filtering system could work, turn people away rather than complaining because they turned up, anyone failing a breathe test should either be turned away or locked in a drunk cell for twelve hours.[/p][/quote]So someone who attends A &E with a broken wrist,leg or worse should be turned away. utter nonsense[/p][/quote]i meant to say someone who attends A &E "drunk" with a broken wrist,leg or worse should be turned away. utter nonsense pellethead
  • Score: 0

12:49pm Wed 14 Nov 12

Joedavid says...

The answer is with the A&E themselves, turn those away who should have gone to a GP, Pharmacy etc. so those that are in need can be seen almost straight away instead of having to wait 4 hours.
The answer is with the A&E themselves, turn those away who should have gone to a GP, Pharmacy etc. so those that are in need can be seen almost straight away instead of having to wait 4 hours. Joedavid
  • Score: 0

3:12pm Wed 14 Nov 12

vikksy says...

I thought it was the job of the triage nurse to sort this out. Can't they turn people away and send them back to their GP's?
I thought it was the job of the triage nurse to sort this out. Can't they turn people away and send them back to their GP's? vikksy
  • Score: 0

3:25pm Wed 14 Nov 12

modman61 says...

I thought is was common practice to go to the desk first. This is where they should be turned away.
I thought is was common practice to go to the desk first. This is where they should be turned away. modman61
  • Score: 0

3:26pm Wed 14 Nov 12

Willard says...

Plea by working patients to GP's, try and open at times so we can attend surgery. Some people are having to work 14 hour days at six days per week to keep the wolf from the door. What happened to Saturday openings? what about a late night service to 9.00pm. At least casualty is open all day and you get a prescription for what the chemist isnt allowed to sell to you.
Plea by working patients to GP's, try and open at times so we can attend surgery. Some people are having to work 14 hour days at six days per week to keep the wolf from the door. What happened to Saturday openings? what about a late night service to 9.00pm. At least casualty is open all day and you get a prescription for what the chemist isnt allowed to sell to you. Willard
  • Score: 0

8:50pm Wed 14 Nov 12

jh137 says...

Willard wrote:
Plea by working patients to GP's, try and open at times so we can attend surgery. Some people are having to work 14 hour days at six days per week to keep the wolf from the door. What happened to Saturday openings? what about a late night service to 9.00pm. At least casualty is open all day and you get a prescription for what the chemist isnt allowed to sell to you.
i totally agree, its a real nightmare to see a GP these days. you have to constantly press re-dial and when you do get through there are no appointments left. GPs seriously need to get into the real world with; late/evening surgeries EVERY week-day (on a rota obviously), Sat mornings, for those people who dont get paid if they dont go to work and also offer for workers early morning appointments 6.30-7.30 OR for people who dont(or no longer) go to work!
[quote][p][bold]Willard[/bold] wrote: Plea by working patients to GP's, try and open at times so we can attend surgery. Some people are having to work 14 hour days at six days per week to keep the wolf from the door. What happened to Saturday openings? what about a late night service to 9.00pm. At least casualty is open all day and you get a prescription for what the chemist isnt allowed to sell to you.[/p][/quote]i totally agree, its a real nightmare to see a GP these days. you have to constantly press re-dial and when you do get through there are no appointments left. GPs seriously need to get into the real world with; late/evening surgeries EVERY week-day (on a rota obviously), Sat mornings, for those people who dont get paid if they dont go to work and also offer for workers early morning appointments 6.30-7.30 OR for people who dont(or no longer) go to work! jh137
  • Score: 0

9:11pm Wed 14 Nov 12

Joedavid says...

jh137 wrote:
Willard wrote:
Plea by working patients to GP's, try and open at times so we can attend surgery. Some people are having to work 14 hour days at six days per week to keep the wolf from the door. What happened to Saturday openings? what about a late night service to 9.00pm. At least casualty is open all day and you get a prescription for what the chemist isnt allowed to sell to you.
i totally agree, its a real nightmare to see a GP these days. you have to constantly press re-dial and when you do get through there are no appointments left. GPs seriously need to get into the real world with; late/evening surgeries EVERY week-day (on a rota obviously), Sat mornings, for those people who dont get paid if they dont go to work and also offer for workers early morning appointments 6.30-7.30 OR for people who dont(or no longer) go to work!
Our surgery is the opposite of what you experience, suggest you get a new GP.
Last week I rang in the morning was seeing the doctor 30 minutes later, the doctor had decided I needed to see him straight away.
[quote][p][bold]jh137[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Willard[/bold] wrote: Plea by working patients to GP's, try and open at times so we can attend surgery. Some people are having to work 14 hour days at six days per week to keep the wolf from the door. What happened to Saturday openings? what about a late night service to 9.00pm. At least casualty is open all day and you get a prescription for what the chemist isnt allowed to sell to you.[/p][/quote]i totally agree, its a real nightmare to see a GP these days. you have to constantly press re-dial and when you do get through there are no appointments left. GPs seriously need to get into the real world with; late/evening surgeries EVERY week-day (on a rota obviously), Sat mornings, for those people who dont get paid if they dont go to work and also offer for workers early morning appointments 6.30-7.30 OR for people who dont(or no longer) go to work![/p][/quote]Our surgery is the opposite of what you experience, suggest you get a new GP. Last week I rang in the morning was seeing the doctor 30 minutes later, the doctor had decided I needed to see him straight away. Joedavid
  • Score: 0

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