Help to honour city's WW1 heroes as appeal to raise money for memorial to Bradford Pals is launched

Help to honour city's WW1 heroes with appeal to raise money for new  Bradford Pals memorial

From left, Bradford WW1 Group members, Gerald Beevers, Geoff Barker, Tricia Platts, Council Leader David Green, Councillor John Ruding and Telegraph and Argus Editor, Perry Austin-Clarke at the Bradford PALS memorial to launch the appeal

From left, Bradford WW1 Group members, Gerald Beevers, Geoff Barker, Tricia Platts, Council Leader David Green, Councillor John Ruding and Telegraph and Argus Editor, Perry Austin-Clarke at the Bradford PALS memorial to launch the appeal

The Bradford PALS memorial

The Bradford Pals camp- thought to be in either Bradford or Skipton before they made the journey to France

The Earl of Harewood inspects a battalion of the Bradford Pals on the eve of their departure for France in 1915

First published in News
Last updated
Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Photograph of the Author by , City Hall Reporter

THEY sacrificed their lives in one of the bloodiest battles of all time.

Now, as Britain marks the 100th anniversary of its decision to enter The Great War of 1914-18, it's hoped a fitting memorial can be created for the Bradford Pals who fought and died in the Battle of the Somme.

And the people of the district are being asked to club together to help make it all happen, by donating to a new 'Honour the Pals' appeal.

Today, Bradford Council and the Telegraph & Argus, with the support of the Bradford World War One Group, have joined forces to launch the appeal to raise money for a lasting memorial to those who fell.

It's hoped this memorial will be unveiled in France on the centenary of the beginning of the Battle of the Somme on July 1, 2016, as a lasting reminder of the sacrifice of the many young Bradfordians who lost their lives.

This includes not just the Pals but men from the district who fought with other battalions and regiments - notably the Territorials and the 10th Battalion West Yorks.

The appeal follows calls by locals and history groups for a fitting tribute to the Bradford Pals in or near the French battlefields.

The district has a proud history of honouring its war dead, but while there is a memorial to the Pals in Bradford city centre, many other British towns and cities have also placed memorials to their fallen at the Somme battlefields.

Tricia Platts, secretary of the Bradford World War One group, said her group thought it was hugely important for Bradford to have such a memorial at the Somme.

She said: "Other towns in the north of England who had Pals regiments have got wonderful memorials at the Somme. Why not us?

"It is hugely important, I think, for visitors making trips, especially to the Somme.

"More and more school groups are going and there is nowhere for the school groups from Bradford to go to focus their pupils' attention."

MORE ON BRADFORD'S WAR HEROES AND CITY'S CENTENARY COMMEMORATIONS

Council leader, Councillor David Green, said it was Alan Hall's book The Story of Bradford which first drew his attention to the lack of a memorial to the Pals in France.

He said: "That just set me thinking that given there's a memorial in Bradford city centre, it seems a tragedy that we don't have some form of recognition of those who died in the area of the Battle of the Somme."

Cllr Green said that, after speaking to T&A editor Perry Austin-Clarke, they had decided to set up an appeal to pay for such a memorial.

And he said he wanted to see as many people as possible contribute small amounts to the fund, to give the appeal a real sense of community.

He said: "When you look back at how many of the cenotaphs were funded, it was through public appeal and public donation.

"It is almost trying to get that spirit back."

Mr Austin-Clarke added: “The appalling loss and bloody sacrifice of the First World War must never be forgotten and there is no more fitting way to keep that message alive, 100 years later, than to create a new, solid and lasting memorial bought and paid for by the descendants who are here today because their ancestors died in our name.

“We hope we can erect a fitting tribute that many, many generations to come will use to help teach about the futility of war but also the sheer courage of those who were willing to die to help safeguard the future for those they left behind.”

The Bradford World War One group placed its own plaque to the Pals in the French village of Hébuterne in 2002.

But chairman Geoff Barker said an official memorial would be a fitting way to remember those who had fought and died.

ENTER THE CHILDREN'S WORLD WAR ONE POETRY COMPETITION

He said: "Nearly everyone in Bradford has got some relative, now going back to great-grandfathers and great-uncles, who were involved in that campaign.

"They may not have been at the Somme that day, but they may well have been."

The Bradford Pals formed part of the West Yorkshire Regiment and on July 1, 1916, they took part in action on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.

At 7.30 that morning, whistles blew and British soldiers left their trenches to walk across No Man's Land towards the German lines. But the attack was not a surprise - enemy gunfire started and the slaughter began.

Although the exact number of casualties is not known, it is estimated that around three-quarters of the 1,394 Pals who went 'over the top' were either killed or injured that day.

The Battle of the Somme continued until November 18, 1916, on both sides of the River Somme in France.

Men from Bradford were lost at Serre (the Pals), Thiepval (the Territorials) and Fricourt (10th Battalion West Yorks).

In total, more than 1,000,000 men were wounded or killed, making it one of history's bloodiest battles.

During the First World War the total number of military and civilian casualties was more than 37 million. There were more than 16 million deaths and more than 20 million wounded.

Each year, dignitaries, members of the armed forces and well-wishers gather in Bradford city centre to commemorate the anniversary of the start of the Battle of the Somme and the loss of Pals lives.

DONATE TO THE HONOUR THE PALS APPEAL

To donate to the appeal, send a cheque, payable to 'Honour the Pals Appeal', with your name and address and contact details to:

Honour the Pals Appeal
Telegraph & Argus
Hall Ings
Bradford
BD1 1JR

Alternatively, hand it in at the Telegraph & Argus office, City Hall, in Bradford or Keighley Town Hall.

DOWNLOAD AN HONOUR THE PALS APPEAL DONATION FORM TO SEND A MESSAGE OF DEDICATION

Comments (29)

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6:16am Mon 4 Aug 14

CanaBull says...

Any chance of putting this online so that those of us who were born in, or have connections to Bradford, but don't live in the area any more can more easily contribute?
Any chance of putting this online so that those of us who were born in, or have connections to Bradford, but don't live in the area any more can more easily contribute? CanaBull
  • Score: 19

7:53am Mon 4 Aug 14

Idlesteve says...

100 years ago today the Bradford pals marched from Belle Vue barracks on Manningham lane to tge camp at Ripon ( your first picture is unclear of the location) before transfer to France. My Great Grandad Freddie White of Idle served his country, was wounded, returned to fight and thankfully returned home to his wife Doris. He lived until 1981 and had one son Ronald ( Ronnie) who served in the Navy during the Second World War. To my Great grandad and every single person who played a part, thank you is not enough, you will always be remembered. What you saw and endured was truly unimaginable.
100 years ago today the Bradford pals marched from Belle Vue barracks on Manningham lane to tge camp at Ripon ( your first picture is unclear of the location) before transfer to France. My Great Grandad Freddie White of Idle served his country, was wounded, returned to fight and thankfully returned home to his wife Doris. He lived until 1981 and had one son Ronald ( Ronnie) who served in the Navy during the Second World War. To my Great grandad and every single person who played a part, thank you is not enough, you will always be remembered. What you saw and endured was truly unimaginable. Idlesteve
  • Score: 27

8:22am Mon 4 Aug 14

fedupwiththeBS says...

How much do we need to raise for this and yes it is a disgrace that there is not one already in place.

I suggest that David Green gets the loan that Omar Khan received at Bradford Bulls paid back and puts that into the kitty for a start!
How much do we need to raise for this and yes it is a disgrace that there is not one already in place. I suggest that David Green gets the loan that Omar Khan received at Bradford Bulls paid back and puts that into the kitty for a start! fedupwiththeBS
  • Score: 5

8:31am Mon 4 Aug 14

Cowboy Song says...

I would have thought that Green would be more concerned about raising funds for a Palestinian memorial.

Brilliant idea for the Pals memorial though
I would have thought that Green would be more concerned about raising funds for a Palestinian memorial. Brilliant idea for the Pals memorial though Cowboy Song
  • Score: -2

8:43am Mon 4 Aug 14

LeftLongAgo says...

T&A. Can you set up an account so we can transfer money from abroad. Great idea for a memorial - lets finally honour our own instead of flying foreign flags over City Hall.
"And Lo, a mighty army came out of The North"
T&A. Can you set up an account so we can transfer money from abroad. Great idea for a memorial - lets finally honour our own instead of flying foreign flags over City Hall. "And Lo, a mighty army came out of The North" LeftLongAgo
  • Score: 20

8:48am Mon 4 Aug 14

BCFC1911 says...

Like our current armed forces these men are true heroes in every sense of the word
Like our current armed forces these men are true heroes in every sense of the word BCFC1911
  • Score: 25

8:51am Mon 4 Aug 14

linebacker2 says...

Idlesteve wrote:
100 years ago today the Bradford pals marched from Belle Vue barracks on Manningham lane to tge camp at Ripon ( your first picture is unclear of the location) before transfer to France. My Great Grandad Freddie White of Idle served his country, was wounded, returned to fight and thankfully returned home to his wife Doris. He lived until 1981 and had one son Ronald ( Ronnie) who served in the Navy during the Second World War. To my Great grandad and every single person who played a part, thank you is not enough, you will always be remembered. What you saw and endured was truly unimaginable.
Think you'll find the Pals didn't head straight for for France.

Bradford and Leeds Pals headed to Alexendria in Egypt to defend the Suez Canal in December 1915. It was during 1916 the battalion moved to France.

Here's a couple of facts you might be interested in
- Both the Bradford and Leeds pals were nearly torpedoed in the Med.
- The Bradford Pals were probably the first Bradfordians to enjoy curry, they met up with Indian troops in Egypt and swapped curry for fags (a sensible choice)
[quote][p][bold]Idlesteve[/bold] wrote: 100 years ago today the Bradford pals marched from Belle Vue barracks on Manningham lane to tge camp at Ripon ( your first picture is unclear of the location) before transfer to France. My Great Grandad Freddie White of Idle served his country, was wounded, returned to fight and thankfully returned home to his wife Doris. He lived until 1981 and had one son Ronald ( Ronnie) who served in the Navy during the Second World War. To my Great grandad and every single person who played a part, thank you is not enough, you will always be remembered. What you saw and endured was truly unimaginable.[/p][/quote]Think you'll find the Pals didn't head straight for for France. Bradford and Leeds Pals headed to Alexendria in Egypt to defend the Suez Canal in December 1915. It was during 1916 the battalion moved to France. Here's a couple of facts you might be interested in - Both the Bradford and Leeds pals were nearly torpedoed in the Med. - The Bradford Pals were probably the first Bradfordians to enjoy curry, they met up with Indian troops in Egypt and swapped curry for fags (a sensible choice) linebacker2
  • Score: 16

9:31am Mon 4 Aug 14

toniken says...

Perhaps in this day and age if an easier method of payment was set up , the response would be better, Online bank account or even Paypal would help people who no longer live in Bradford to be part of this.
Perhaps in this day and age if an easier method of payment was set up , the response would be better, Online bank account or even Paypal would help people who no longer live in Bradford to be part of this. toniken
  • Score: 13

9:56am Mon 4 Aug 14

bcfc1903 says...

What a fitting tribute this would be to those who made the ultimate sacrifice fighting for this country. Like many many other Bradford families we had family members both killed and injured(shell shocked). We'll certainly be contributing towards this Bradford Pals memorial. Well done to all involved in setting up this memorial fund
What a fitting tribute this would be to those who made the ultimate sacrifice fighting for this country. Like many many other Bradford families we had family members both killed and injured(shell shocked). We'll certainly be contributing towards this Bradford Pals memorial. Well done to all involved in setting up this memorial fund bcfc1903
  • Score: 11

10:33am Mon 4 Aug 14

Idlesteve says...

linebacker2 wrote:
Idlesteve wrote:
100 years ago today the Bradford pals marched from Belle Vue barracks on Manningham lane to tge camp at Ripon ( your first picture is unclear of the location) before transfer to France. My Great Grandad Freddie White of Idle served his country, was wounded, returned to fight and thankfully returned home to his wife Doris. He lived until 1981 and had one son Ronald ( Ronnie) who served in the Navy during the Second World War. To my Great grandad and every single person who played a part, thank you is not enough, you will always be remembered. What you saw and endured was truly unimaginable.
Think you'll find the Pals didn't head straight for for France.

Bradford and Leeds Pals headed to Alexendria in Egypt to defend the Suez Canal in December 1915. It was during 1916 the battalion moved to France.

Here's a couple of facts you might be interested in
- Both the Bradford and Leeds pals were nearly torpedoed in the Med.
- The Bradford Pals were probably the first Bradfordians to enjoy curry, they met up with Indian troops in Egypt and swapped curry for fags (a sensible choice)
Never said they went straight to France, they did indeed spend some time in several postings. France is the key place for my Great Grandad as it is where he spent almost all his time and where he was wounded.
[quote][p][bold]linebacker2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Idlesteve[/bold] wrote: 100 years ago today the Bradford pals marched from Belle Vue barracks on Manningham lane to tge camp at Ripon ( your first picture is unclear of the location) before transfer to France. My Great Grandad Freddie White of Idle served his country, was wounded, returned to fight and thankfully returned home to his wife Doris. He lived until 1981 and had one son Ronald ( Ronnie) who served in the Navy during the Second World War. To my Great grandad and every single person who played a part, thank you is not enough, you will always be remembered. What you saw and endured was truly unimaginable.[/p][/quote]Think you'll find the Pals didn't head straight for for France. Bradford and Leeds Pals headed to Alexendria in Egypt to defend the Suez Canal in December 1915. It was during 1916 the battalion moved to France. Here's a couple of facts you might be interested in - Both the Bradford and Leeds pals were nearly torpedoed in the Med. - The Bradford Pals were probably the first Bradfordians to enjoy curry, they met up with Indian troops in Egypt and swapped curry for fags (a sensible choice)[/p][/quote]Never said they went straight to France, they did indeed spend some time in several postings. France is the key place for my Great Grandad as it is where he spent almost all his time and where he was wounded. Idlesteve
  • Score: 8

10:50am Mon 4 Aug 14

Albion. says...

linebacker2 wrote:
Idlesteve wrote:
100 years ago today the Bradford pals marched from Belle Vue barracks on Manningham lane to tge camp at Ripon ( your first picture is unclear of the location) before transfer to France. My Great Grandad Freddie White of Idle served his country, was wounded, returned to fight and thankfully returned home to his wife Doris. He lived until 1981 and had one son Ronald ( Ronnie) who served in the Navy during the Second World War. To my Great grandad and every single person who played a part, thank you is not enough, you will always be remembered. What you saw and endured was truly unimaginable.
Think you'll find the Pals didn't head straight for for France.

Bradford and Leeds Pals headed to Alexendria in Egypt to defend the Suez Canal in December 1915. It was during 1916 the battalion moved to France.

Here's a couple of facts you might be interested in
- Both the Bradford and Leeds pals were nearly torpedoed in the Med.
- The Bradford Pals were probably the first Bradfordians to enjoy curry, they met up with Indian troops in Egypt and swapped curry for fags (a sensible choice)
Curry recipes were available in this country from the mid 1700s, you see mention of curry in many historical English novels and there were some curry chefs here but probably not in Bradford. You could be right though as it might have been more of a southern thing.
[quote][p][bold]linebacker2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Idlesteve[/bold] wrote: 100 years ago today the Bradford pals marched from Belle Vue barracks on Manningham lane to tge camp at Ripon ( your first picture is unclear of the location) before transfer to France. My Great Grandad Freddie White of Idle served his country, was wounded, returned to fight and thankfully returned home to his wife Doris. He lived until 1981 and had one son Ronald ( Ronnie) who served in the Navy during the Second World War. To my Great grandad and every single person who played a part, thank you is not enough, you will always be remembered. What you saw and endured was truly unimaginable.[/p][/quote]Think you'll find the Pals didn't head straight for for France. Bradford and Leeds Pals headed to Alexendria in Egypt to defend the Suez Canal in December 1915. It was during 1916 the battalion moved to France. Here's a couple of facts you might be interested in - Both the Bradford and Leeds pals were nearly torpedoed in the Med. - The Bradford Pals were probably the first Bradfordians to enjoy curry, they met up with Indian troops in Egypt and swapped curry for fags (a sensible choice)[/p][/quote]Curry recipes were available in this country from the mid 1700s, you see mention of curry in many historical English novels and there were some curry chefs here but probably not in Bradford. You could be right though as it might have been more of a southern thing. Albion.
  • Score: 2

10:52am Mon 4 Aug 14

edmo57 says...

brilliant idea,my grandad was in the pals at the somme he would have been so proud,ive been trying without success to find anyone who either remembers him or any relatives ,we now live away .he was jack/john wilcock from kingswood st gt horton married to emily and was the projectionist at the old cinema there . if anyone could help it would be greatly appreciated at edmo57@hotmail.co.uk
brilliant idea,my grandad was in the pals at the somme he would have been so proud,ive been trying without success to find anyone who either remembers him or any relatives ,we now live away .he was jack/john wilcock from kingswood st gt horton married to emily and was the projectionist at the old cinema there . if anyone could help it would be greatly appreciated at edmo57@hotmail.co.uk edmo57
  • Score: 7

2:05pm Mon 4 Aug 14

Thackleygirl says...

I think this is a wonderful idea and yes we must never forgot that people sacrificed their lives so we can live the way we do here in Great Britain. It would be a very different country if things had turned out differently.

I am surprised to read the 'T & A Your Vote' and the question is - "Would you like to see a memorial to the Bradford Pals killed during the Battle of the Somme erected in France"?
As I type this the percentages are Yes = 83% and No = 17% - I cannot understand why it is not 100% ......
I think this is a wonderful idea and yes we must never forgot that people sacrificed their lives so we can live the way we do here in Great Britain. It would be a very different country if things had turned out differently. I am surprised to read the 'T & A Your Vote' and the question is - "Would you like to see a memorial to the Bradford Pals killed during the Battle of the Somme erected in France"? As I type this the percentages are Yes = 83% and No = 17% - I cannot understand why it is not 100% ...... Thackleygirl
  • Score: 6

2:13pm Mon 4 Aug 14

Andy Mac says...

IdleSteve / Linebacker ...... they went from Manningham Lane to Skipton, then on to Ripon for advanced training. From Ripon they went to Fovant in Wiltshire, then on to Egypt (my great grandad had his leg broken by a camel ! ) then they were called up to France.

I am interested in thoughts if I were to arrange either a walk (Bradford to Skipton) to raise funds - 'March of the Pals' or I am even willing to cycle Bradford to Serre or vice versa again to raise funds for the cause. But I will NOT cycle to Egypt :-)

Thoughts ?
IdleSteve / Linebacker ...... they went from Manningham Lane to Skipton, then on to Ripon for advanced training. From Ripon they went to Fovant in Wiltshire, then on to Egypt (my great grandad had his leg broken by a camel ! ) then they were called up to France. I am interested in thoughts if I were to arrange either a walk (Bradford to Skipton) to raise funds - 'March of the Pals' or I am even willing to cycle Bradford to Serre or vice versa again to raise funds for the cause. But I will NOT cycle to Egypt :-) Thoughts ? Andy Mac
  • Score: 3

2:25pm Mon 4 Aug 14

jozieme says...

could we include those young men who did not sign up for the Pals, but signed up for other regiments like my mother's brother William Grogan who is remembered only on the Tyne Cot memorial as he was recruited into the Northumberland Fusiliers and at 17 when he joined up had never been outside of Bradford and is not on any memorial in this City.
He died at Paschendale along with other members of this regiment all mowed down together..... just 20 years old....
could we include those young men who did not sign up for the Pals, but signed up for other regiments like my mother's brother William Grogan who is remembered only on the Tyne Cot memorial as he was recruited into the Northumberland Fusiliers and at 17 when he joined up had never been outside of Bradford and is not on any memorial in this City. He died at Paschendale along with other members of this regiment all mowed down together..... just 20 years old.... jozieme
  • Score: 11

2:40pm Mon 4 Aug 14

stiflers mom says...

For anybody interested if you go onto the British legion website and click on the everyman remembered link you can lay a poppy and leave a commeration for anyone who lost their lives in ww1
For anybody interested if you go onto the British legion website and click on the everyman remembered link you can lay a poppy and leave a commeration for anyone who lost their lives in ww1 stiflers mom
  • Score: 9

2:58pm Mon 4 Aug 14

linebacker2 says...

jozieme wrote:
could we include those young men who did not sign up for the Pals, but signed up for other regiments like my mother's brother William Grogan who is remembered only on the Tyne Cot memorial as he was recruited into the Northumberland Fusiliers and at 17 when he joined up had never been outside of Bradford and is not on any memorial in this City.
He died at Paschendale along with other members of this regiment all mowed down together..... just 20 years old....
That's a very good point. Only a small percentage of Bradfordians who served in WW1 were in the Bradford Pals, also quite a high number of the Bradford Pals came from outside Bradford - in fact some were foreign!
[quote][p][bold]jozieme[/bold] wrote: could we include those young men who did not sign up for the Pals, but signed up for other regiments like my mother's brother William Grogan who is remembered only on the Tyne Cot memorial as he was recruited into the Northumberland Fusiliers and at 17 when he joined up had never been outside of Bradford and is not on any memorial in this City. He died at Paschendale along with other members of this regiment all mowed down together..... just 20 years old....[/p][/quote]That's a very good point. Only a small percentage of Bradfordians who served in WW1 were in the Bradford Pals, also quite a high number of the Bradford Pals came from outside Bradford - in fact some were foreign! linebacker2
  • Score: 8

3:16pm Mon 4 Aug 14

Thackleygirl says...

If you Google 'Bradford Pals' and click on 'images' there are some very special photographs...
If you Google 'Bradford Pals' and click on 'images' there are some very special photographs... Thackleygirl
  • Score: 1

4:43pm Mon 4 Aug 14

BierleyBoy says...

What a duplicitous scumbag Green is to bat this off as a public subscription issue.

The man has a sickening disregard for anything that will not do his party any good at the ballot box.
What a duplicitous scumbag Green is to bat this off as a public subscription issue. The man has a sickening disregard for anything that will not do his party any good at the ballot box. BierleyBoy
  • Score: -4

6:04pm Mon 4 Aug 14

Robin of Loxley says...

Cowboy Song wrote:
I would have thought that Green would be more concerned about raising funds for a Palestinian memorial.

Brilliant idea for the Pals memorial though
Take your vile pro-Zionist support elsewhere. It's not needed here (nor anywhere else for that matter).
[quote][p][bold]Cowboy Song[/bold] wrote: I would have thought that Green would be more concerned about raising funds for a Palestinian memorial. Brilliant idea for the Pals memorial though[/p][/quote]Take your vile pro-Zionist support elsewhere. It's not needed here (nor anywhere else for that matter). Robin of Loxley
  • Score: 21

9:01pm Mon 4 Aug 14

pcmanners says...

BierleyBoy wrote:
What a duplicitous scumbag Green is to bat this off as a public subscription issue.

The man has a sickening disregard for anything that will not do his party any good at the ballot box.
It is a great pity that the Government was prevented from privatising the War Graves Commission. They would have been able to raise capital for additional monuments by charging an entrance fee to their cemeteries. Hopefully this will happen after the next election.
[quote][p][bold]BierleyBoy[/bold] wrote: What a duplicitous scumbag Green is to bat this off as a public subscription issue. The man has a sickening disregard for anything that will not do his party any good at the ballot box.[/p][/quote]It is a great pity that the Government was prevented from privatising the War Graves Commission. They would have been able to raise capital for additional monuments by charging an entrance fee to their cemeteries. Hopefully this will happen after the next election. pcmanners
  • Score: -8

9:06pm Mon 4 Aug 14

jjbabs19 says...

I welcome this new initiative to place a War Memorial for those who died in the 1st W.W. My gr.father was one such soldier, along with some of his relatives, friends and neighbours. To many to note. My gr.father 1892 - 1917 was Fred Hargreaves Pte. 20214 of the 10th. Battalion, Duke of Wellington's Regt. was one such Soldier. Fred survived the 1st. July on the Somme, but died on 1st. Oct.1917 and was buried at Tyne Cott Cemetery, Passendale, Belgium. Plot 27, Row B. Grave Space 21.

He'd seen his daughter briefly before leaving for the front. His son, he never saw. My gran, my mum, and Freds gr. children watched "religously" every year the Royal Brittish Legion, Ceremonials, Rememberence Day Services andParades in memory of Fred Hargreaves. Gran & Mum both crying. Gran was told his body had not been found, there were no "dog" tags to say he Had. Gran's Widow Pension was delayed for this reason. Gran struggled to bring up her children. We watched the Commemorations of those that had died, every year. Gran & Mum crying, Gran would say Fred was nowt but the sweepings up. Years later doing Family history I learnt there was a grave.

Thank-You to the Royal British Legion, they sent me photographs of the grave. Gran had passed on, she never knew he had a Resting place. For mum, when she saw the photographs, she couldn't stop crying. For her it was too late to visit Plot 27, Row B. Grave Sace 21 at Tyne Cott. I'd like to ask, why? were they denide this information regarding their loved one.

I will support this initiative for the memorial for my Gr.Father & all others from the local area. Maybe late, but befitting.
I welcome this new initiative to place a War Memorial for those who died in the 1st W.W. My gr.father was one such soldier, along with some of his relatives, friends and neighbours. To many to note. My gr.father 1892 - 1917 was Fred Hargreaves Pte. 20214 of the 10th. Battalion, Duke of Wellington's Regt. was one such Soldier. Fred survived the 1st. July on the Somme, but died on 1st. Oct.1917 and was buried at Tyne Cott Cemetery, Passendale, Belgium. Plot 27, Row B. Grave Space 21. He'd seen his daughter briefly before leaving for the front. His son, he never saw. My gran, my mum, and Freds gr. children watched "religously" every year the Royal Brittish Legion, Ceremonials, Rememberence Day Services andParades in memory of Fred Hargreaves. Gran & Mum both crying. Gran was told his body had not been found, there were no "dog" tags to say he Had. Gran's Widow Pension was delayed for this reason. Gran struggled to bring up her children. We watched the Commemorations of those that had died, every year. Gran & Mum crying, Gran would say Fred was nowt but the sweepings up. Years later doing Family history I learnt there was a grave. Thank-You to the Royal British Legion, they sent me photographs of the grave. Gran had passed on, she never knew he had a Resting place. For mum, when she saw the photographs, she couldn't stop crying. For her it was too late to visit Plot 27, Row B. Grave Sace 21 at Tyne Cott. I'd like to ask, why? were they denide this information regarding their loved one. I will support this initiative for the memorial for my Gr.Father & all others from the local area. Maybe late, but befitting. jjbabs19
  • Score: 5

8:11am Tue 5 Aug 14

LeftLongAgo says...

Robin Of Loxley?
Your comments sound like they come from "Rashid of Lahore". If you dont like The UK then there are airports to take you to where you want to go. I am proud of my heritage, and dont want foreign flags flying in my name over my city.
Robin Of Loxley? Your comments sound like they come from "Rashid of Lahore". If you dont like The UK then there are airports to take you to where you want to go. I am proud of my heritage, and dont want foreign flags flying in my name over my city. LeftLongAgo
  • Score: 0

1:08pm Tue 5 Aug 14

Robin of Loxley says...

LeftLongAgo wrote:
Robin Of Loxley?
Your comments sound like they come from "Rashid of Lahore". If you dont like The UK then there are airports to take you to where you want to go. I am proud of my heritage, and dont want foreign flags flying in my name over my city.
Criticising vile Israeli terrorist scum should be on everyone's mind.
[quote][p][bold]LeftLongAgo[/bold] wrote: Robin Of Loxley? Your comments sound like they come from "Rashid of Lahore". If you dont like The UK then there are airports to take you to where you want to go. I am proud of my heritage, and dont want foreign flags flying in my name over my city.[/p][/quote]Criticising vile Israeli terrorist scum should be on everyone's mind. Robin of Loxley
  • Score: -3

1:11pm Tue 5 Aug 14

dizzyknits says...

What i cant get my head round is the enormous scale of the death toll 800,000 from GB and commonwealth. I walk round tong cemetery every day and there is 7 ww1 graves and all the names on the war memorial...this war must have virtually wiped out the cream of the youth of this country...i dont think there wasnt a town city or village that didnt lose someone.
. Ive been to the menin gate in Ypres a couple of times ,the Belgian people commemorate the sacrifice of this countries people every night of the year...so yes it is right that a memorial with the names of all those men from Bradford be erected.
None of us alive today can imagine the horrors that they suffered.
What i cant get my head round is the enormous scale of the death toll 800,000 from GB and commonwealth. I walk round tong cemetery every day and there is 7 ww1 graves and all the names on the war memorial...this war must have virtually wiped out the cream of the youth of this country...i dont think there wasnt a town city or village that didnt lose someone. . Ive been to the menin gate in Ypres a couple of times ,the Belgian people commemorate the sacrifice of this countries people every night of the year...so yes it is right that a memorial with the names of all those men from Bradford be erected. None of us alive today can imagine the horrors that they suffered. dizzyknits
  • Score: 1

9:40pm Tue 5 Aug 14

LeftLongAgo says...

To Robin Of Loxley.
The Bradford Pals and The Israeli Defence force would have been brothers in arms. Fighting against intolerance and a backward religion founded by a war criminal. Oh, peace be upon him, what a joke.
To Robin Of Loxley. The Bradford Pals and The Israeli Defence force would have been brothers in arms. Fighting against intolerance and a backward religion founded by a war criminal. Oh, peace be upon him, what a joke. LeftLongAgo
  • Score: 1

8:59am Wed 6 Aug 14

Andy Mac says...

Robin. Vile Israeli terrorist scum ? What are your views on Hamas ? Hamas fire rockets, day in day out at CIVILIAN targets. Israel respond by trying to take out the perpetrators, who choose to hide behind CIVILIAN shields. Who are the terrorists again please ?
https://www.youtube.
com/watch?v=fIYfhAKF
RLQ

Am pretty saddened that a backward, 'peace-loving' cult has once again infiltrated a story on true Bradford Heroes. Saddened too that British politics is marred by third-world backward politics and the resignation of an MP whose efforts would have been better concentrated on her constituents, none of whom live in the Gaza strip.
Robin. Vile Israeli terrorist scum ? What are your views on Hamas ? Hamas fire rockets, day in day out at CIVILIAN targets. Israel respond by trying to take out the perpetrators, who choose to hide behind CIVILIAN shields. Who are the terrorists again please ? https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=fIYfhAKF RLQ Am pretty saddened that a backward, 'peace-loving' cult has once again infiltrated a story on true Bradford Heroes. Saddened too that British politics is marred by third-world backward politics and the resignation of an MP whose efforts would have been better concentrated on her constituents, none of whom live in the Gaza strip. Andy Mac
  • Score: 0

10:10am Thu 7 Aug 14

ardrossan says...

This is in remembrance of my grandfather, Walter Ashworth, who was born in Baildon and was one of the first volunteers to sign up for the Pals. He was a tailor and worked for a large store in Bradford until then. He was in the 2nd Pals and was wounded very badly on the first day of the Somme battle. He was shot in the face, the back and the leg and lay in a crater filled with water for almost three days. His body was then put with the dead in a field and there he lay until an ambulance man noticed his arm moving. He was quickly transferred to a field station and then back to England. He was one of the first soldiers to be operated on by Sir Harold Gillies and paintings of his facial operations are in the Royal College of Surgeons in London.
He was an amazing man. He carried his facial scars with pride and never let them get him down. He never talked about the war but went back to being a tailor, married a lovely lady (my grandmother) from Cheadle, and had a wonderful daughter (my mother). My sister and I adored him. He was such a gentle slight person one wonders how he managed to carry his kit, never mind go over the top! But he was a patriot like all of them and that was enough.
We are immensely proud of him and I personally am so pleased you are planning to build a memorial to the Bradford Pals over in France. I was devastated when I discovered there was hardly any mention of them over there and yet they had done so much for us. Well done, Bradford!
This is in remembrance of my grandfather, Walter Ashworth, who was born in Baildon and was one of the first volunteers to sign up for the Pals. He was a tailor and worked for a large store in Bradford until then. He was in the 2nd Pals and was wounded very badly on the first day of the Somme battle. He was shot in the face, the back and the leg and lay in a crater filled with water for almost three days. His body was then put with the dead in a field and there he lay until an ambulance man noticed his arm moving. He was quickly transferred to a field station and then back to England. He was one of the first soldiers to be operated on by Sir Harold Gillies and paintings of his facial operations are in the Royal College of Surgeons in London. He was an amazing man. He carried his facial scars with pride and never let them get him down. He never talked about the war but went back to being a tailor, married a lovely lady (my grandmother) from Cheadle, and had a wonderful daughter (my mother). My sister and I adored him. He was such a gentle slight person one wonders how he managed to carry his kit, never mind go over the top! But he was a patriot like all of them and that was enough. We are immensely proud of him and I personally am so pleased you are planning to build a memorial to the Bradford Pals over in France. I was devastated when I discovered there was hardly any mention of them over there and yet they had done so much for us. Well done, Bradford! ardrossan
  • Score: 1

7:38am Sat 9 Aug 14

Disco66 says...

I would be more content if the memorial was erected in the city centre. I wonder just how many of Bradford's residents would ever visit The Somme.
Like so many, my Uncle Tom, lied about his age and joined The Pals. He survived and on his return joined Bradford Police. He ended his career as Det. Chief Superintendent C.I.D.
Thomas Rushworth. R.I.P.
I would be more content if the memorial was erected in the city centre. I wonder just how many of Bradford's residents would ever visit The Somme. Like so many, my Uncle Tom, lied about his age and joined The Pals. He survived and on his return joined Bradford Police. He ended his career as Det. Chief Superintendent C.I.D. Thomas Rushworth. R.I.P. Disco66
  • Score: 1

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