Road crashes causing death and serious injury in Bradford district fall by half in a decade

Road crashes causing death and serious injury in Bradford district fall by half in a decade

ROAD SAFETY: Bradford Council highways officer Simon D'Vali and Cllr Val Slater outside Sandy Lane Primary School where traffic calming measures have been installed

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Ambulance crew and police at the scene of a road crash in Skipton Road, Utley (9833841)

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First published in News Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Photograph of the Author by , T&A Reporter

THE number of road deaths in Bradford halved between 2002 and 2013, new figures have revealed.

Thirteen people were killed in collisions on the district's roads in last year compared with 26 fatalities 12 years ago.

A report has also found that last year Bradford Council was ahead of the West Yorkshire Local Transport Plan's year-on-year percentage reduction target for crashes resulting in death or serious injury.

In 2012, the Bradford district experienced 221 of those - behind the target of 212 - but in 2013 the number had been reduced to 190.

Also, the total number of all road collisions in Bradford district had more than halved between 2002 and last year.

The information - which comes as part of a review into the number of people killed or seriously injured on the district's roads - will be presented to a meeting of the Council's environment and waste management overview and scrutiny Committee tomorrow.

Councillor Val Slater, portfolio holder for housing, planning and transport, said: "I think it is brilliant news and all created by a lot of work within the Council, and also within a lot of volunteer groups that work with the Council on road safety issues.

"It is an ongoing thing. It is working, but the death or serious injury of one person is one too many. We must continue the good work."

Cllr Slater said work to educate high-risk groups, particularly those on the verge of learning to drive, was pivotal.

Simon D'Vali, a principal highways engineer at Bradford Council, said: "We are pretty cutting edge here in Bradford.

"We are extremely pleased with what is going on, but it doesn't mean we can be complacent about it. The moment we take our foot off the gas the figures could go up again. One accident is bad - we are not going to be happy until we reduce it further.

"Education, training and publicity are very important. Everyone is responsible for themselves and others and the network. It is not just the authority, it is the responsibility of individuals."

He added: "Over the last ten years there has been a large, concentrated effort to make sure it is not just highways dealing with this.

"Police, public health and other departments within the Council, like maintenance, all have an holistic view of what goes on.

"We understand this is the best way forward, to work together. We will save money as well as lives because everyone is trying to achieve the same goal.

"We make sure our efforts look at where the serious incidents occur. We micro-manage the network to a manner where we understand what is going on on roads and in locations, so we can employ something that fits for particular areas."

Mr D'Vali said crossing spaces, vehicle and pedestrian use, and location of schools and retirement homes were among things considered by the team. Physical schemes included two in Sandy Lane and Harden, where 20mph zones, speed bumps and raised crossing areas.

Philip Goose, senior community engagement officer at Brake, the road safety charity, said: “Brake is pleased to see the numbers of deaths and serious injuries on Bradford’s roads has halved in the past decade, and is also pleased to see that the Council still thinks there is much to be done – we believe that we should aim for zero deaths and serious injuries on our roads.

"Twenty mph limits as the default for urban areas is key to this; stopping distances drop from 23 metres at 30mph, to 12 metres at 20mph, increasing your ability to stop suddenly if needed. 20mph limits also have a range of other benefits, including being good for public health, the environment, more social communities. They are also cost effective through public health savings and benefits to the local economy.”

Kevin Clinton, head of road safety at the Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA), said: “RoSPA strongly supports 20mph schemes as they help to make our roads safer, especially for the most vulnerable road users; children, pedestrians and cyclists. They also encourage people to walk and cycle, bringing health and environmental benefits.

“20mph zones with traffic calming are very effective at reducing speeds and preventing accidents.”

Comments (9)

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7:08am Mon 1 Sep 14

Albion. says...

Much of that could be down to safer vehicles. It might be of interest to know if the number of crashes as a whole has significantly reduced.
Much of that could be down to safer vehicles. It might be of interest to know if the number of crashes as a whole has significantly reduced. Albion.
  • Score: 12

8:41am Mon 1 Sep 14

llos25 says...

If its a good news day VS will be everywhere don´t forget this women is responsible for wasting hundreds of thousands of pounds of taxpayers money on hair brained schemes.
A bucket of paint and a 20mph speed limit which cannot be enforced by law will not stop unsafe drivers.
If its a good news day VS will be everywhere don´t forget this women is responsible for wasting hundreds of thousands of pounds of taxpayers money on hair brained schemes. A bucket of paint and a 20mph speed limit which cannot be enforced by law will not stop unsafe drivers. llos25
  • Score: 5

10:00am Mon 1 Sep 14

bachtothefuture says...

The only reason City Hall introduced 20 mph speed limits was to increase the opportunities for fining drivers. The drop in deaths is just a by-product of Cllr Slater's cunning little plan.
The only reason City Hall introduced 20 mph speed limits was to increase the opportunities for fining drivers. The drop in deaths is just a by-product of Cllr Slater's cunning little plan. bachtothefuture
  • Score: 7

1:11pm Mon 1 Sep 14

BierleyBoy says...

Note that there is no mention of how these deaths occur, e.g a car full of young people, or a pedestrian.
Note that there is no mention of how these deaths occur, e.g a car full of young people, or a pedestrian. BierleyBoy
  • Score: 3

1:13pm Mon 1 Sep 14

llos25 says...

They cannot prosecute people for exceeding 20mph in a 20 zone at the moment.
They cannot prosecute people for exceeding 20mph in a 20 zone at the moment. llos25
  • Score: 2

2:59pm Mon 1 Sep 14

Freddy Elliot says...

Albion. wrote:
Much of that could be down to safer vehicles. It might be of interest to know if the number of crashes as a whole has significantly reduced.
Must be the safer vehicles. Since 2002 I have seen driving standards in the city steadily plummet. Also people may be avoiding certain areas of the city now knowing full well what they are up against.
[quote][p][bold]Albion.[/bold] wrote: Much of that could be down to safer vehicles. It might be of interest to know if the number of crashes as a whole has significantly reduced.[/p][/quote]Must be the safer vehicles. Since 2002 I have seen driving standards in the city steadily plummet. Also people may be avoiding certain areas of the city now knowing full well what they are up against. Freddy Elliot
  • Score: 11

5:14pm Mon 1 Sep 14

linebacker2 says...

Freddy Elliot wrote:
Albion. wrote:
Much of that could be down to safer vehicles. It might be of interest to know if the number of crashes as a whole has significantly reduced.
Must be the safer vehicles. Since 2002 I have seen driving standards in the city steadily plummet. Also people may be avoiding certain areas of the city now knowing full well what they are up against.
Yes car safety has improved, but mobile phones have helped an awful lot as the emergency services can be called sooner. Also NHS A&E care has improved, but as usual the council like to credit themselves with all these bash the motorists schemes they come up with.
[quote][p][bold]Freddy Elliot[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Albion.[/bold] wrote: Much of that could be down to safer vehicles. It might be of interest to know if the number of crashes as a whole has significantly reduced.[/p][/quote]Must be the safer vehicles. Since 2002 I have seen driving standards in the city steadily plummet. Also people may be avoiding certain areas of the city now knowing full well what they are up against.[/p][/quote]Yes car safety has improved, but mobile phones have helped an awful lot as the emergency services can be called sooner. Also NHS A&E care has improved, but as usual the council like to credit themselves with all these bash the motorists schemes they come up with. linebacker2
  • Score: 3

6:09pm Mon 1 Sep 14

Bone_idle18 says...

Hard to get up enough speed most of the time to be killed due to the congestion on our roads.
Hard to get up enough speed most of the time to be killed due to the congestion on our roads. Bone_idle18
  • Score: 2

10:38am Tue 2 Sep 14

pollywolly says...

I notice there is a photo of Sandy Lane on this feature. The problem with Sandy Lane is actual speeding, not crashes as such. Bumps there haven't stopped speeding, especially at the lower end of Cottingley Road. Just generated a lot of noise from empty low loaders, cars with trailers etc. Only cameras would help but you can't have them unless there's been a fatal accident, apparently.
I notice there is a photo of Sandy Lane on this feature. The problem with Sandy Lane is actual speeding, not crashes as such. Bumps there haven't stopped speeding, especially at the lower end of Cottingley Road. Just generated a lot of noise from empty low loaders, cars with trailers etc. Only cameras would help but you can't have them unless there's been a fatal accident, apparently. pollywolly
  • Score: 2

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