Coroner orders Bradford Council to ensure care companies do what they are paid to

SUDDEN DEATH: Edward Duffy

SUDDEN DEATH: Edward Duffy

First published in News Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Photograph of the Author by , T&A Reporter

BRADFORD Council has a duty to make sure the supported living care it pays contracted companies to provide on its behalf is delivered where it is needed, a coroner has said.

Assistant Bradford Coroner Roger Whittaker was raising concerns at the conclusion of an inquest into an epileptic man's death where a support worker panicked and removed tablets that should have been taken earlier that day.

The inquest heard how Edward Duffy's care worker Amjad Choudry had picked up the tablets after police arrived to investigate the 37-year-old's sudden death at his supported living bungalow in Briardale Road, Heaton, on July 14, 2012.

Mr Choudry said he was going to show the tablets to paramedics but police demanded everyone leave the scene, which he did taking the tablets which he later passed to a detective, the hearing was told.

The missing tablets did not contribute to Mr Duffy's death but his family had concerns Mr Choudry had removed them because he could have missed that morning's check as part of his work for Bradford Supported Housing Ltd, contracted by Bradford Council to provide him with accommodation and support.

They were also worried that paramedics told police Mr Duffy's body was cooler than expected if Mr Choudry had seen him alive only a couple of hours earlier as he had claimed.

During yesterday's inquest, which found Mr Duffy had died from natural causes after an an epileptic attack, the court heard how Bradford Council paid monthly invoices from Bradford Supported Housing Ltd on a nod and trust basis. It was contracted to give Mr Duffy 26 hours care a week, which included reminding him to take his medication for seizures.

Despite Mr Whittaker being told the company often put in more hours of support than it was paid for, he still raised a number of concerns about the keeping and recording of its paperwork, including support workers' weekly time sheets, and that a diary tracking workers' visits to Mr Duffy had gone missing.

Mr Whittaker told Majid Choudry, a director of Bradford Supported Housing: "It worries me its (the diary) no longer about". Mr Choudry responded: "It worries me more than you sir," to which Mr Whittaker replied: "I don't think it does."

The inquest heard that care worker Amjad Choudry was Majid Choudry's brother.

Mr Whittaker said because of the number of care hours given by Bradford Supported Housing Ltd to Mr Duffy, it did not come under the monitoring remit of the Care Quality Commission but he added: "It's incumbent on Bradford Council to make sure these properties are properly accounted for".

After the inquest Bernard Lanigan, Bradford Council's assistant director integration and transition, said: "We will continue to work with Bradford Supported Housing to ensure its records are accurate and up-to-date and we will take action if we feel that this is not happening."

Comments (17)

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9:19am Sat 9 Aug 14

mad matt says...

Well, I suppose you get what you pay for. Pay a decent wage and you would get properly trained and qualified carers.
If these care workers were paid a PROPER wage, properly supervised and the time allowed for the visits and travel between visits actually reflected the schedule of work, then the quality of care would improve.
Well, I suppose you get what you pay for. Pay a decent wage and you would get properly trained and qualified carers. If these care workers were paid a PROPER wage, properly supervised and the time allowed for the visits and travel between visits actually reflected the schedule of work, then the quality of care would improve. mad matt
  • Score: 19

10:10am Sat 9 Aug 14

otleygent says...

mad matt wrote:
Well, I suppose you get what you pay for. Pay a decent wage and you would get properly trained and qualified carers.
If these care workers were paid a PROPER wage, properly supervised and the time allowed for the visits and travel between visits actually reflected the schedule of work, then the quality of care would improve.
I completely agree. Local Authorities are pretty much obliged to go for the cheapest provider, who are usually cheap because they pay their staff peanuts. No way to treat the most vulnerable people in our relatively prosperous country. Take the services back in house and pay people enough to take a pride in their work.
[quote][p][bold]mad matt[/bold] wrote: Well, I suppose you get what you pay for. Pay a decent wage and you would get properly trained and qualified carers. If these care workers were paid a PROPER wage, properly supervised and the time allowed for the visits and travel between visits actually reflected the schedule of work, then the quality of care would improve.[/p][/quote]I completely agree. Local Authorities are pretty much obliged to go for the cheapest provider, who are usually cheap because they pay their staff peanuts. No way to treat the most vulnerable people in our relatively prosperous country. Take the services back in house and pay people enough to take a pride in their work. otleygent
  • Score: 24

12:03pm Sat 9 Aug 14

mark04 says...

Do the care workers actually have the responsibility to see that the person does actually take their tablets, I visit my elderly grandfather every week who has got alzheimers,and find tables all over the house that he should have taken,mostly down the side of his chair.I get the impression they just put the tablets in his hand and thats it.
Should they not ensure they see that the patient actually swallows them.
As this then leads to futher problems down the line with aggression and depression because he has not taken the pills.Anybody else have this problem.
Do the care workers actually have the responsibility to see that the person does actually take their tablets, I visit my elderly grandfather every week who has got alzheimers,and find tables all over the house that he should have taken,mostly down the side of his chair.I get the impression they just put the tablets in his hand and thats it. Should they not ensure they see that the patient actually swallows them. As this then leads to futher problems down the line with aggression and depression because he has not taken the pills.Anybody else have this problem. mark04
  • Score: 12

12:11pm Sat 9 Aug 14

Robin of Loxley says...

This is what happens when family members couldn't give 2 hoots about their loved ones (via letting strangers 'take care' of them).
This is what happens when family members couldn't give 2 hoots about their loved ones (via letting strangers 'take care' of them). Robin of Loxley
  • Score: 1

12:51pm Sat 9 Aug 14

Mixter says...

Robin of Loxley wrote:
This is what happens when family members couldn't give 2 hoots about their loved ones (via letting strangers 'take care' of them).
Its not always as cut and dried. The wifes family generally cared for their parents, but there was also times when no-one could 'be there', when they were all at work. So, care-workers dropped in and did bits. And generally, they didnt do a bad job. Apart from the meals on wheels bloke, who was literally robbing them. He got sacked.
[quote][p][bold]Robin of Loxley[/bold] wrote: This is what happens when family members couldn't give 2 hoots about their loved ones (via letting strangers 'take care' of them).[/p][/quote]Its not always as cut and dried. The wifes family generally cared for their parents, but there was also times when no-one could 'be there', when they were all at work. So, care-workers dropped in and did bits. And generally, they didnt do a bad job. Apart from the meals on wheels bloke, who was literally robbing them. He got sacked. Mixter
  • Score: 3

1:58pm Sat 9 Aug 14

bradfordian says...

This isonly the tip of the iceberg. How many more people will die before people realise what is really going on with care? Fifteen minutes per visit even for people who can't do anything themselves.
This isonly the tip of the iceberg. How many more people will die before people realise what is really going on with care? Fifteen minutes per visit even for people who can't do anything themselves. bradfordian
  • Score: 8

4:37pm Sat 9 Aug 14

eau_de_vie says...

am a homecare worker, just responding regarding medication, we dont necessarily have to give meds, it depends what has been agreed on care plan, however most people with dementia/ alzheimers, who live alone or have no family, then we probably would be the one who should 'administer' or prompt medications.... there s many issues within care, in some ways, it is best for people to stay at home as long as they wish, however sometimes, i do believe some people would be safer in a nursing home. homecare (care at people's personal homes), the council is responsible for giving contract not to the best care providers, but rather to the provider who states they can do the job the cheapest and fastest! hence why you find care provider sending care worker to do 15 min calls, or 30min where we have to provide personal care, making a meal, meds, making bed, laundry! aww and whilst we are not paid for travelling between clients, and no time being allowed to travel 2, 3, even 5 miles between clients, madness! i do see a lot of care workers who do care, and who like me make time (not paid) to assist/ look after our clients the best way (it should be), but there are some people who dont know better, and by just doing the minimum, may find themselves neglecting a person s needs.... the council is the main culprit, and then the care providers, for not standing up to this mess.... and play along....
am a homecare worker, just responding regarding medication, we dont necessarily have to give meds, it depends what has been agreed on care plan, however most people with dementia/ alzheimers, who live alone or have no family, then we probably would be the one who should 'administer' or prompt medications.... there s many issues within care, in some ways, it is best for people to stay at home as long as they wish, however sometimes, i do believe some people would be safer in a nursing home. homecare (care at people's personal homes), the council is responsible for giving contract not to the best care providers, but rather to the provider who states they can do the job the cheapest and fastest! hence why you find care provider sending care worker to do 15 min calls, or 30min where we have to provide personal care, making a meal, meds, making bed, laundry! aww and whilst we are not paid for travelling between clients, and no time being allowed to travel 2, 3, even 5 miles between clients, madness! i do see a lot of care workers who do care, and who like me make time (not paid) to assist/ look after our clients the best way (it should be), but there are some people who dont know better, and by just doing the minimum, may find themselves neglecting a person s needs.... the council is the main culprit, and then the care providers, for not standing up to this mess.... and play along.... eau_de_vie
  • Score: 12

6:14pm Sat 9 Aug 14

Newalljude says...

Whilst there are good and bad in all jobs. I have come across fabulous carers and awful ones. I will always remember visiting a dying lady to administer pain relief in Christmas Day. The lady from home care who had been there that morning and had since gone home to be with her family turned up. She had plated up a full Christmas dinner for the gent who was mostly alone at Christmas with his dying wife. This changed his day, he smiled, he was grateful, he realised somebody did care and he was better able to continue looking after his poor wife. I will never forget this simple act of kindness from a carer who will have been on a poor wage.
Whilst there are good and bad in all jobs. I have come across fabulous carers and awful ones. I will always remember visiting a dying lady to administer pain relief in Christmas Day. The lady from home care who had been there that morning and had since gone home to be with her family turned up. She had plated up a full Christmas dinner for the gent who was mostly alone at Christmas with his dying wife. This changed his day, he smiled, he was grateful, he realised somebody did care and he was better able to continue looking after his poor wife. I will never forget this simple act of kindness from a carer who will have been on a poor wage. Newalljude
  • Score: 15

9:19pm Sat 9 Aug 14

They only do damage! says...

Robin of Loxley wrote:
This is what happens when family members couldn't give 2 hoots about their loved ones (via letting strangers 'take care' of them).
Unfortunateley, in this time were at, our persons in charge of monies, seem to take care of the detriment to us all. But us, who pay buy work in taxes, wont be robbed by the elitist,going under the guise of robin of loxley no more!!!.
[quote][p][bold]Robin of Loxley[/bold] wrote: This is what happens when family members couldn't give 2 hoots about their loved ones (via letting strangers 'take care' of them).[/p][/quote]Unfortunateley, in this time were at, our persons in charge of monies, seem to take care of the detriment to us all. But us, who pay buy work in taxes, wont be robbed by the elitist,going under the guise of robin of loxley no more!!!. They only do damage!
  • Score: 1

12:55am Sun 10 Aug 14

basil fawlty says...

The story here is that the coroner suspects that the services that were contracted were possibly not delivered. The diary of carer visits was missing for example. Doesnt look like a safe service.
The story here is that the coroner suspects that the services that were contracted were possibly not delivered. The diary of carer visits was missing for example. Doesnt look like a safe service. basil fawlty
  • Score: 7

9:11am Sun 10 Aug 14

MontyLeMar says...

basil fawlty wrote:
The story here is that the coroner suspects that the services that were contracted were possibly not delivered. The diary of carer visits was missing for example. Doesnt look like a safe service.
Indeed it doesn't look like a safe service but I wonder what systems the council has in force to check that the level of service they are receiving is the same as was contracted for? I bet they don't have any or very few and have probably fired the staff responsible in the last round of cut backs. If you ask the government about care for the elderly they say they are giving sufficient money to the councils. If you ask the councils they say they are not receiving enough money from the government. What is going on here? Treating vulnerable people like pawns in a game is very dangerous and will end in disaster. But maybe this is the new reality of growing old in the UK - neglect and abuse on a massive scale because people in power think there are more important things to spend the money on, like £50 billion on HS2.
[quote][p][bold]basil fawlty[/bold] wrote: The story here is that the coroner suspects that the services that were contracted were possibly not delivered. The diary of carer visits was missing for example. Doesnt look like a safe service.[/p][/quote]Indeed it doesn't look like a safe service but I wonder what systems the council has in force to check that the level of service they are receiving is the same as was contracted for? I bet they don't have any or very few and have probably fired the staff responsible in the last round of cut backs. If you ask the government about care for the elderly they say they are giving sufficient money to the councils. If you ask the councils they say they are not receiving enough money from the government. What is going on here? Treating vulnerable people like pawns in a game is very dangerous and will end in disaster. But maybe this is the new reality of growing old in the UK - neglect and abuse on a massive scale because people in power think there are more important things to spend the money on, like £50 billion on HS2. MontyLeMar
  • Score: 1

9:54am Sun 10 Aug 14

wolfspeak says...

Remember contracted out services are to make money for the company first and to care for the vulnerable, second, hence short cuts, missed visits and cover-ups when things go wrong.
Employing relatives is a dangerous and potentially corrupting situation especially when one manages the other.
Remember contracted out services are to make money for the company first and to care for the vulnerable, second, hence short cuts, missed visits and cover-ups when things go wrong. Employing relatives is a dangerous and potentially corrupting situation especially when one manages the other. wolfspeak
  • Score: 4

11:50am Sun 10 Aug 14

allinittogether says...

Robin of Loxley wrote:
This is what happens when family members couldn't give 2 hoots about their loved ones (via letting strangers 'take care' of them).
The owner of the company concerned obviously cared about his own family, so much so he gave him the job that lead to this tragedy
[quote][p][bold]Robin of Loxley[/bold] wrote: This is what happens when family members couldn't give 2 hoots about their loved ones (via letting strangers 'take care' of them).[/p][/quote]The owner of the company concerned obviously cared about his own family, so much so he gave him the job that lead to this tragedy allinittogether
  • Score: 4

12:43pm Sun 10 Aug 14

cheeky1 says...

I care for my son who is disabled, I hear lots of terrible things on the television,in the papers and other places about the drop in standard of care! Or should I say compassion! What kind of world are we living in? Okay so family sometimes have very little time to visit older or disabled members of their family. Bet they have time to visit a shopping mall or somewhere on a weekend! Or maybe not!
But time cost very little, manners and compassion again nothing.
I care for my son who is disabled, I hear lots of terrible things on the television,in the papers and other places about the drop in standard of care! Or should I say compassion! What kind of world are we living in? Okay so family sometimes have very little time to visit older or disabled members of their family. Bet they have time to visit a shopping mall or somewhere on a weekend! Or maybe not! But time cost very little, manners and compassion again nothing. cheeky1
  • Score: 3

3:52pm Sun 10 Aug 14

em30 says...

these so called carers!!.....are in it for the money,trust me I know !!!!
these so called carers!!.....are in it for the money,trust me I know !!!! em30
  • Score: -1

5:48pm Sun 10 Aug 14

cheeky1 says...

em30 wrote:
these so called carers!!.....are in it for the money,trust me I know !!!!
Yeah, how can you pay to care! Its something you have inside you! No one feels guilty about wrong doing today!
[quote][p][bold]em30[/bold] wrote: these so called carers!!.....are in it for the money,trust me I know !!!![/p][/quote]Yeah, how can you pay to care! Its something you have inside you! No one feels guilty about wrong doing today! cheeky1
  • Score: 1

10:21am Mon 11 Aug 14

A650 says...

The contracts for delivering care are awarded on a “who can do it cheapest” basis by Councils. Bradford isn’t alone. Local authorities across the country are doing the same. Meanwhile care suffers for the most vulnerable.

How can a private company that undercuts the NHS or Council providers by miles provide the same quality service when it pays minimum wage, doesn’t pay carers for time spent travelling between patients and doesn’t bother to monitor care properly? Companies like that don’t attract the best people.

You have to pay in order to get the best service. These are people’s lives at risk and not an excuse for a tin pot company to make a profit.
The contracts for delivering care are awarded on a “who can do it cheapest” basis by Councils. Bradford isn’t alone. Local authorities across the country are doing the same. Meanwhile care suffers for the most vulnerable. How can a private company that undercuts the NHS or Council providers by miles provide the same quality service when it pays minimum wage, doesn’t pay carers for time spent travelling between patients and doesn’t bother to monitor care properly? Companies like that don’t attract the best people. You have to pay in order to get the best service. These are people’s lives at risk and not an excuse for a tin pot company to make a profit. A650
  • Score: 1

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