Where you live could mean you’re more likely to get bitten, says new study

A pitbull terrier

Jamie Farrell recovering in hospital after being attacked by a Japanese Akita

Chris Hirst was savagely attacked by a dog while making a delivery in Bierley

Mick Chyriwsky has his forearm punctured, also by a Japanese Akita

First published in News Bradford Telegraph and Argus: Photograph of the Author by , Bradford Chief Reporter

Dog attacks led to more than 100 hospital stays in the Bradford area last year as new figures show that people living in poorer areas are more likely to have to go to hospital with canine-related injuries.

Research by the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) also reveals that outside of London, West Yorkshire had the highest number of hospitalisation due to injuries caused by dogs at 498. Of those, 104 were in the Bradford area. In 2012/13, the local figure was 105, and it was 110 in 2011/12.

And while the number of admissions has remained steady in Bradford year-on-year, across the region it increased from 464 in 2012/13.

Researchers at the health data service found that the rates of hospital admissions were three times higher for people from poor areas compared to their wealthier neighbours.

Out of every 100,000 people who live in the most deprived areas of England, there were 24 admissions to hospital because of a dog attack. Meanwhile, in the richest regions there were eight admissions for every 100,000 people. In West Yorkshire, there were 22 admissions for every 100,000 people – the third-highest rate in the country.

Chairman of the HSCIC Kingsley Manning said: “Today’s report shows that hospital admissions for bites and strikes by dogs are three times as high in the most deprived areas of England as in the least deprived areas. This is fascinating new data that we haven’t produced before.

“Our statistics also show that hospitals have dealt with more admissions for bites and strikes by mammals compared to last year.

“We know that dog-bite rates are particularly high among young children. As we head towards the summer months, when admission rates for dog bites are at their highest, these trends may be worth further study by healthcare organisations and public sector bodies.”

In 2006, the Telegraph & Argus started its Curb The Danger Dogs campaign calling on the Government to toughen up its Dangerous Dogs Act. Since then there have been some legal changes.

However, West Yorkshire Police said not all incidents would be reported.

Inspector Lorna Meredith, head of West Yorkshire Police Dog Section, said: “A high proportion of people bitten by dogs are bitten in a domestic situation, and often occur in the home involving family dogs or dogs they know.

“Those incidents where a person is bitten by an aggressive, unknown dog – if they are reported to the police – are dealt with robustly and can result in owners appearing in court.

“The problem of dangerous dogs still exists, and legislation has recently been revised to allow us to deal with incidents that occur on private property.

“It is important to realise that bites from all animals on humans are, in the main, low. Laws are in place to deal with these incidents should they occur. Many animal owners – and in particular dog owners – are responsible and care for their pets in a safe and lawful manner.”

Nationally, dog attacks led to 6,740 hospital stays – a six per cent rise from the previous year.

Children aged up to nine accounted for the highest number of admissions and the most common ailment was an injury to the wrist or hand.

The figures also suggested that the attacks were more common in the summer, the HSCIC said.

The data also showed the number of hospital admissions as a result of other animal attacks was also on the rise.

Bites and strikes from other mammals such as horses, foxes and cats accounted for 2,970 admissions – a ten per cent increase compared to the previous 12-month period.

Caroline Kisko, secretary of dog organisation the Kennel Club, said: “Dogs are a huge part of our lives in Britain and children are naturally curious and excited to be around them, so it is crucial that they are taught from an early age how best to interact with them.

“As we head towards summer, more and more dog owners will be out walking their pets for longer, so now is the perfect opportunity to sit down with your child and speak to them about dog safety, and using the tips and game available through the Kennel Club’s Safe and Sound Scheme, have some fun at the same time.”

Man left with gaping wounds after attack

In recent months there have been a number of dog attacks in Bradford – including two just this month.

On April 10, 27-year-old Jamie Farrell was left with gaping wounds to his leg and arm after a Japanese Akita, which has since been seized by police, savaged him in Pollard Lane Undercliffe. He underwent surgery at Bradford Royal Infirmary.

And just days later, on April 15, a man was arrested after a six-year-old boy needed hospital treatment for foot injuries caused by a dog on Leeds Road, Bradford Moor.

Last September, Mick Chyriwsky’s thumb was bitten to the bone and his left forearm punctured in several places by a Japanese Akita in Sheridan Street, Bowling, leading to treatment at BRI.

In August 2013, Nine-year-old Callum Gilpin was hospitalised after he was bitten by a dog on the Canterbury Estate, and the same month police shot dead an aggressive dog after 13-year-old Luca Lanfear was subjected to a ten-minute gruelling attack at a house on Frank Street, Great Horton.

‘Life turned upside down’

Delivery driver Chris Hirst said his life changed forever after he was savagely attacked by a dog in Bierley.

A year on from the vicious assault and the 63-year-old has just had his eighth operation – a painful four-hour procedure involving removing bone and bone marrow from his hip to use to repair damage to his right arm.

Mr Hirst’s arm was snapped in two by an American bulldog when he was delivering prescription medication in Fairfax Crescent, Bierley. Had it not been for the actions of passer-by Danny Gomersall, who hit the dog with a shovel, Mr Hirst says he would be dead.

“I was quite happy doing my job and then for this to happen, it’s just turned my life upside down. There’s a whole lot of things I can’t do now. If it wasn’t for my wife, I’d be up the creek without a paddle,” he said.

The father-of-two, of Tyersal, said his working days are now over and the past year has been a mix of physiotherapy and hospital appointments.

“The figures are atrocious, let’s face it,” he added.

“I know we’re quite a vast population in Bradford, but 104 is a lot. Those dogs should be properly licensed and they should be recorded with the police.”

He said police were unable to act following his attack as it happened on private land.

Admissions figures

Hospital admissions for dog bites from February 2013 to January 2014 by where victims live

  •  West Yorkshire – 498 admissions; 21.7 per 100,000 people
  • Airedale, Wharfedale and Craven CCG – 17 admissions; 10.7 per 100,000
  • Bradford City CCG – between one and five (exact figures not released to protect patient confidentiality)
  •  Bradford Districts CCG – 84 admissions; 25.2 per 100,000
  • Calderdale CCG – 32 admissions; 15.6 per 100,000
  •  Leeds West CCG – 73 admissions; 22.8 per 100,000
  • North Kirklees CCG – 45 admissions; 24.1 per 100,000

Comments (12)

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8:47am Fri 25 Apr 14

Ratters Rat says...

Where the T&A get there stories is beyond me.
If you live in a poor area your dog will bite what utter rubbish.
I know people in these areas who are hard working decent people.
Yes they have dogs and I dont feel anymore threatened by their dogs than I would in any other area.
If a dog is going to bite then it will where ever it lives.
Its down to a small minority of bad owners who could live anywhere.
If ALL dogs were micro chipped/ owners had to have insurance and a license then it would solve a lot of problems.
Where the T&A get there stories is beyond me. If you live in a poor area your dog will bite what utter rubbish. I know people in these areas who are hard working decent people. Yes they have dogs and I dont feel anymore threatened by their dogs than I would in any other area. If a dog is going to bite then it will where ever it lives. Its down to a small minority of bad owners who could live anywhere. If ALL dogs were micro chipped/ owners had to have insurance and a license then it would solve a lot of problems. Ratters Rat
  • Score: -10

8:56am Fri 25 Apr 14

Joedavid says...

Did all these dogs get put down?
Should be considered doing this automatically and would send a strong message to bad owners to keep them under control.
Did all these dogs get put down? Should be considered doing this automatically and would send a strong message to bad owners to keep them under control. Joedavid
  • Score: 20

9:19am Fri 25 Apr 14

bubble64 says...

Ratters Rat wrote:
Where the T&A get there stories is beyond me.
If you live in a poor area your dog will bite what utter rubbish.
I know people in these areas who are hard working decent people.
Yes they have dogs and I dont feel anymore threatened by their dogs than I would in any other area.
If a dog is going to bite then it will where ever it lives.
Its down to a small minority of bad owners who could live anywhere.
If ALL dogs were micro chipped/ owners had to have insurance and a license then it would solve a lot of problems.
i agree ..it can happen anywhere and its nott the dogs fault if it hasnt been trained right ..but it is always the dog that gets balamed and then more often than not sentenced to death ...any dog will bite not just these so called dangerous dogs ..i know a few people who have a so called dangerous dog ..and they are the softest dogs you could come across because they have been trained right ..i have 2 dogs ..both mongrels and they have lived with us since been pups ..but i know if they were put in a situation where they felt threatened they probably would bite ...i wouldnt trust them with young children and every dog owner should feel the same about their dogs ...the akita that attacked the poor delivery man recently was been walked by a 6 year old ..why would anyone let a 6 year old walk such a powerful dog is beyond me ..a 6 year old shouldn't walk any dog unless supervised by a responsible adult ..!!
[quote][p][bold]Ratters Rat[/bold] wrote: Where the T&A get there stories is beyond me. If you live in a poor area your dog will bite what utter rubbish. I know people in these areas who are hard working decent people. Yes they have dogs and I dont feel anymore threatened by their dogs than I would in any other area. If a dog is going to bite then it will where ever it lives. Its down to a small minority of bad owners who could live anywhere. If ALL dogs were micro chipped/ owners had to have insurance and a license then it would solve a lot of problems.[/p][/quote]i agree ..it can happen anywhere and its nott the dogs fault if it hasnt been trained right ..but it is always the dog that gets balamed and then more often than not sentenced to death ...any dog will bite not just these so called dangerous dogs ..i know a few people who have a so called dangerous dog ..and they are the softest dogs you could come across because they have been trained right ..i have 2 dogs ..both mongrels and they have lived with us since been pups ..but i know if they were put in a situation where they felt threatened they probably would bite ...i wouldnt trust them with young children and every dog owner should feel the same about their dogs ...the akita that attacked the poor delivery man recently was been walked by a 6 year old ..why would anyone let a 6 year old walk such a powerful dog is beyond me ..a 6 year old shouldn't walk any dog unless supervised by a responsible adult ..!! bubble64
  • Score: -2

9:51am Fri 25 Apr 14

mr-dog says...

Ban the Japanese Akita now!
Ban the Japanese Akita now! mr-dog
  • Score: 17

10:14am Fri 25 Apr 14

cityofdreams says...

people in this city cant keep there off spring under control so what chances do they have of wanting to make there dog a pet ,,not a snarling beast to scare away the other wrong uns that **** round there patch
people in this city cant keep there off spring under control so what chances do they have of wanting to make there dog a pet ,,not a snarling beast to scare away the other wrong uns that **** round there patch cityofdreams
  • Score: 4

10:34am Fri 25 Apr 14

Albion. says...

Ratters Rat wrote:
Where the T&A get there stories is beyond me.
If you live in a poor area your dog will bite what utter rubbish.
I know people in these areas who are hard working decent people.
Yes they have dogs and I dont feel anymore threatened by their dogs than I would in any other area.
If a dog is going to bite then it will where ever it lives.
Its down to a small minority of bad owners who could live anywhere.
If ALL dogs were micro chipped/ owners had to have insurance and a license then it would solve a lot of problems.
None of the examples given here were in upper class areas. Although dog attacks can happen anywhere, you don't tend to see as many idiots with status dogs in better areas. Your opening paragraph isn't quite what the report says and the suppliers of the information ARE mentioned.
[quote][p][bold]Ratters Rat[/bold] wrote: Where the T&A get there stories is beyond me. If you live in a poor area your dog will bite what utter rubbish. I know people in these areas who are hard working decent people. Yes they have dogs and I dont feel anymore threatened by their dogs than I would in any other area. If a dog is going to bite then it will where ever it lives. Its down to a small minority of bad owners who could live anywhere. If ALL dogs were micro chipped/ owners had to have insurance and a license then it would solve a lot of problems.[/p][/quote]None of the examples given here were in upper class areas. Although dog attacks can happen anywhere, you don't tend to see as many idiots with status dogs in better areas. Your opening paragraph isn't quite what the report says and the suppliers of the information ARE mentioned. Albion.
  • Score: 12

10:41am Fri 25 Apr 14

baccy2410 says...

Nothing to do with high temperatures then? but because of living in poorer areas, yea pull the other one.
Nothing to do with high temperatures then? but because of living in poorer areas, yea pull the other one. baccy2410
  • Score: -10

12:02pm Fri 25 Apr 14

The Hoffster says...

Mr Hirst’s arm was snapped in two by an American bulldog when he was delivering prescription medication in Fairfax Crescent, Bierley.

He said police were unable to act following his attack as it happened on private land.


What kind of BS is this ?!!

So if someone was killed, the owners of the dog (and the dog itself) would be let-off scot free because the tragedy occurred on private land?

Despicable,
[quote]Mr Hirst’s arm was snapped in two by an American bulldog when he was delivering prescription medication in Fairfax Crescent, Bierley. He said police were unable to act following his attack as it happened on private land. [/quote] What kind of BS is this ?!! So if someone was killed, the owners of the dog (and the dog itself) would be let-off scot free because the tragedy occurred on private land? Despicable, The Hoffster
  • Score: 6

1:49pm Fri 25 Apr 14

linebacker2 says...

The Hoffster wrote:
Mr Hirst’s arm was snapped in two by an American bulldog when he was delivering prescription medication in Fairfax Crescent, Bierley.

He said police were unable to act following his attack as it happened on private land.


What kind of BS is this ?!!

So if someone was killed, the owners of the dog (and the dog itself) would be let-off scot free because the tragedy occurred on private land?

Despicable,
Not quite, charges of manslaughter could follow, but the point is that the dangerous dogs act does not apply on private land.

The DDA was brought in back in 1991 (following a fatal attack in Bradford on Rukshana Khan). Since then Governments have brought in 100's of new laws on all kinds of nonsense, but left this gaping loophole!
[quote][p][bold]The Hoffster[/bold] wrote: [quote]Mr Hirst’s arm was snapped in two by an American bulldog when he was delivering prescription medication in Fairfax Crescent, Bierley. He said police were unable to act following his attack as it happened on private land. [/quote] What kind of BS is this ?!! So if someone was killed, the owners of the dog (and the dog itself) would be let-off scot free because the tragedy occurred on private land? Despicable,[/p][/quote]Not quite, charges of manslaughter could follow, but the point is that the dangerous dogs act does not apply on private land. The DDA was brought in back in 1991 (following a fatal attack in Bradford on Rukshana Khan). Since then Governments have brought in 100's of new laws on all kinds of nonsense, but left this gaping loophole! linebacker2
  • Score: 4

2:52pm Fri 25 Apr 14

Albion. says...

linebacker2 wrote:
The Hoffster wrote:
Mr Hirst’s arm was snapped in two by an American bulldog when he was delivering prescription medication in Fairfax Crescent, Bierley.

He said police were unable to act following his attack as it happened on private land.


What kind of BS is this ?!!

So if someone was killed, the owners of the dog (and the dog itself) would be let-off scot free because the tragedy occurred on private land?

Despicable,
Not quite, charges of manslaughter could follow, but the point is that the dangerous dogs act does not apply on private land.

The DDA was brought in back in 1991 (following a fatal attack in Bradford on Rukshana Khan). Since then Governments have brought in 100's of new laws on all kinds of nonsense, but left this gaping loophole!
www.gov.uk/governmen
t/news/clampdown-on-
dangerous-dogs

Not for long hopefully.
[quote][p][bold]linebacker2[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Hoffster[/bold] wrote: [quote]Mr Hirst’s arm was snapped in two by an American bulldog when he was delivering prescription medication in Fairfax Crescent, Bierley. He said police were unable to act following his attack as it happened on private land. [/quote] What kind of BS is this ?!! So if someone was killed, the owners of the dog (and the dog itself) would be let-off scot free because the tragedy occurred on private land? Despicable,[/p][/quote]Not quite, charges of manslaughter could follow, but the point is that the dangerous dogs act does not apply on private land. The DDA was brought in back in 1991 (following a fatal attack in Bradford on Rukshana Khan). Since then Governments have brought in 100's of new laws on all kinds of nonsense, but left this gaping loophole![/p][/quote]www.gov.uk/governmen t/news/clampdown-on- dangerous-dogs Not for long hopefully. Albion.
  • Score: 5

9:28pm Fri 25 Apr 14

Morleys lass says...

So youve used the photo of some poor dog that was found abandoned last week for an example of a dangerous dog !! T&A im disgusted at this ! Talk about stereo typing dogs. this poor lads world fell apart last week and now youve got him pictured as a dangerous dog
So youve used the photo of some poor dog that was found abandoned last week for an example of a dangerous dog !! T&A im disgusted at this ! Talk about stereo typing dogs. this poor lads world fell apart last week and now youve got him pictured as a dangerous dog Morleys lass
  • Score: -1

8:46am Sat 26 Apr 14

alive and awake says...

Who would have thought it! Scum bags = scum bag dogs.
Put the dogs down, and sterilise the owners = better society.
Who would have thought it! Scum bags = scum bag dogs. Put the dogs down, and sterilise the owners = better society. alive and awake
  • Score: 1

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