The number of people seeking help for debt problems in Bradford has increased by more than a third, says charity

Bradford Telegraph and Argus: The number of people seeking help for debt problems in Bradford has increased by more than a third, says charity The number of people seeking help for debt problems in Bradford has increased by more than a third, says charity

The number of people seeking help for debt problems in Bradford has increased by more than a third in the last year, according to a charity.

In 2013, StepChange Debt Charity’s helpline was contacted by 1,335 people – up from 973 in 2012.

The organisation said last year Bradford people contacting its helpline were on average £11 short of covering their essential household bills each month and owed £12,222 in unsecured debt.

The 37 per cent increase has been highlighted to coincide with the charity’s Debt Awareness Week (January 20-26), which aims to raise awareness of the potential signs of debt problem and encourage people to get help sooner.

The body’s chief executive Mike O’Connor said: “Debt can have a devastating effect on people’s lives in the form of mental health issues and family breakdown. We need people to take early action to prevent some of the worst effects and get back on their financial feet much sooner.”

The focus week is the latest national campaign to get people talking about the money worries and agencies dealing with the issue are joining forces to promote the free expert advice available.

Step Change Debt Charity’s research also shows that the over 60s now owe more than any other age group, with their debts averaging £23,000.

Age UK is also seeing a significant increase in the number of older people falling in to debt also, possibly linked to a drop in income when reaching retirement, fuel costs and them falling victim to doorstep lenders.

West Yorkshire Trading Standards ( WYTS) is aiming to tackle the problem across Bradford through its SAFER (Scams and Fraud Education for Residents) Project, which is funded by the Big Lottery Fund and has reached more than 2,500 older people since it started in November 2012.

Councillor Val Slater, chairman of the West Yorkshire Trading Standards Committee, said: “The Safer project not only enables older people to feel confident in their communities and in protecting themselves, but also improves the overall health and wellbeing by tackling fuel poverty and reducing anxiety and stress which is often emphasised by debt and financial worries.”

The project has helped 327 older people manage a total of £331,039 of debt of which £193,712 has been completely written off.

StepChange says people a debt problem if they are juggling or falling behind on essential household bills, borrowing to make it through to pay day, only making minimum repayments, borrowing more to pay off existing debts or getting hit by late payments or overdraft charges.

For more information on the WYTS project contact Lanson Moore (0113) 393 9808 or e-mail lmoore1@wyjs.org.uk.

Comments (14)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

8:36am Wed 22 Jan 14

Andy2010 says...

Its time they taught about money management in school.

I have sorted out debts for lots of family and friends and some people just have no idea how to budget or live within their means.

If people were educated in how to budget but also to understand how charges and apr works it would be more beneficial than some of the guff they teach kids nowadays
Its time they taught about money management in school. I have sorted out debts for lots of family and friends and some people just have no idea how to budget or live within their means. If people were educated in how to budget but also to understand how charges and apr works it would be more beneficial than some of the guff they teach kids nowadays Andy2010
  • Score: 16

10:15am Wed 22 Jan 14

Baildonboy says...

I understand that personal finance will soon be on the national curriculum & the sooner the better.There are some basic things people in debt can consider but they need a firmer understanding of debt & finance issues first.

The charity does great work but I guess will be struggling with the increased numbers needling help now as welfare changes kick in.
I understand that personal finance will soon be on the national curriculum & the sooner the better.There are some basic things people in debt can consider but they need a firmer understanding of debt & finance issues first. The charity does great work but I guess will be struggling with the increased numbers needling help now as welfare changes kick in. Baildonboy
  • Score: 5

11:59am Wed 22 Jan 14

Alhaurinrhino says...

People should live within their means, a lot of this is chickens coming home to roost now that the government is cutting back (quite rightly) on the amount of handout they give away.
People need to learn that top of the range smart phones, Sky TV contracts, designer clothing, and alcohol are not necessities, but things that are to be earned if you want them.
People should live within their means, a lot of this is chickens coming home to roost now that the government is cutting back (quite rightly) on the amount of handout they give away. People need to learn that top of the range smart phones, Sky TV contracts, designer clothing, and alcohol are not necessities, but things that are to be earned if you want them. Alhaurinrhino
  • Score: 13

12:08pm Wed 22 Jan 14

alive and awake says...

Alhaurinrhino wrote:
People should live within their means, a lot of this is chickens coming home to roost now that the government is cutting back (quite rightly) on the amount of handout they give away.
People need to learn that top of the range smart phones, Sky TV contracts, designer clothing, and alcohol are not necessities, but things that are to be earned if you want them.
Couldn't have put it better myself.
[quote][p][bold]Alhaurinrhino[/bold] wrote: People should live within their means, a lot of this is chickens coming home to roost now that the government is cutting back (quite rightly) on the amount of handout they give away. People need to learn that top of the range smart phones, Sky TV contracts, designer clothing, and alcohol are not necessities, but things that are to be earned if you want them.[/p][/quote]Couldn't have put it better myself. alive and awake
  • Score: 10

1:02pm Wed 22 Jan 14

Julie D says...

I was in the post office in Keighley last week I over heard a young lady in the queue with a baby in a push chair saying her mum had played hell with her because she had spent £82 on jogging bottoms !!!! then promptly went to the counter to collect her benefits. obviously she gets too much money if she can spend that much on joggers.
I was in the post office in Keighley last week I over heard a young lady in the queue with a baby in a push chair saying her mum had played hell with her because she had spent £82 on jogging bottoms !!!! then promptly went to the counter to collect her benefits. obviously she gets too much money if she can spend that much on joggers. Julie D
  • Score: 10

1:32pm Wed 22 Jan 14

Avro says...

Hardly surprising when one of the UK's largest doorstep lenders is based in the City Center and Bradford is its bread and butter business.
Hardly surprising when one of the UK's largest doorstep lenders is based in the City Center and Bradford is its bread and butter business. Avro
  • Score: 5

1:56pm Wed 22 Jan 14

Farsley Bantam says...

Avro wrote:
Hardly surprising when one of the UK's largest doorstep lenders is based in the City Center and Bradford is its bread and butter business.
Yeah the individuals who sign up for these ridiculous schemes that they cannot afford are totally blameless in all of this.
[quote][p][bold]Avro[/bold] wrote: Hardly surprising when one of the UK's largest doorstep lenders is based in the City Center and Bradford is its bread and butter business.[/p][/quote]Yeah the individuals who sign up for these ridiculous schemes that they cannot afford are totally blameless in all of this. Farsley Bantam
  • Score: 2

2:01pm Wed 22 Jan 14

Farsley Bantam says...

Andy2010 wrote:
Its time they taught about money management in school. I have sorted out debts for lots of family and friends and some people just have no idea how to budget or live within their means. If people were educated in how to budget but also to understand how charges and apr works it would be more beneficial than some of the guff they teach kids nowadays
I have no idea why it isn't compulsary already. The purpose of school is to provide you with the skills you need to look after yourself when you leave and one of the most basic is to be able to manage your finances. Ideally this should be done by your parents but this clearly isn't happening.
[quote][p][bold]Andy2010[/bold] wrote: Its time they taught about money management in school. I have sorted out debts for lots of family and friends and some people just have no idea how to budget or live within their means. If people were educated in how to budget but also to understand how charges and apr works it would be more beneficial than some of the guff they teach kids nowadays[/p][/quote]I have no idea why it isn't compulsary already. The purpose of school is to provide you with the skills you need to look after yourself when you leave and one of the most basic is to be able to manage your finances. Ideally this should be done by your parents but this clearly isn't happening. Farsley Bantam
  • Score: 6

4:04pm Wed 22 Jan 14

Andy2010 says...

Farsley Bantam wrote:
Andy2010 wrote:
Its time they taught about money management in school. I have sorted out debts for lots of family and friends and some people just have no idea how to budget or live within their means. If people were educated in how to budget but also to understand how charges and apr works it would be more beneficial than some of the guff they teach kids nowadays
I have no idea why it isn't compulsary already. The purpose of school is to provide you with the skills you need to look after yourself when you leave and one of the most basic is to be able to manage your finances. Ideally this should be done by your parents but this clearly isn't happening.
They are too busy teaching them about social equality blah blah blah
[quote][p][bold]Farsley Bantam[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Andy2010[/bold] wrote: Its time they taught about money management in school. I have sorted out debts for lots of family and friends and some people just have no idea how to budget or live within their means. If people were educated in how to budget but also to understand how charges and apr works it would be more beneficial than some of the guff they teach kids nowadays[/p][/quote]I have no idea why it isn't compulsary already. The purpose of school is to provide you with the skills you need to look after yourself when you leave and one of the most basic is to be able to manage your finances. Ideally this should be done by your parents but this clearly isn't happening.[/p][/quote]They are too busy teaching them about social equality blah blah blah Andy2010
  • Score: 4

5:37pm Wed 22 Jan 14

pellethead says...

Alhaurinrhino wrote:
People should live within their means, a lot of this is chickens coming home to roost now that the government is cutting back (quite rightly) on the amount of handout they give away.
People need to learn that top of the range smart phones, Sky TV contracts, designer clothing, and alcohol are not necessities, but things that are to be earned if you want them.
How about the person who has worked , earning a good wage and has taken responsible decisions to borrow. This person then loses his job and can no longer afford the repayments. I say bring back debtors jails to punish those people who cant pay their debts. In fact why don't we bring back the stocks or reintroduce the Poor Law
[quote][p][bold]Alhaurinrhino[/bold] wrote: People should live within their means, a lot of this is chickens coming home to roost now that the government is cutting back (quite rightly) on the amount of handout they give away. People need to learn that top of the range smart phones, Sky TV contracts, designer clothing, and alcohol are not necessities, but things that are to be earned if you want them.[/p][/quote]How about the person who has worked , earning a good wage and has taken responsible decisions to borrow. This person then loses his job and can no longer afford the repayments. I say bring back debtors jails to punish those people who cant pay their debts. In fact why don't we bring back the stocks or reintroduce the Poor Law pellethead
  • Score: -1

9:45pm Wed 22 Jan 14

The Hoffster says...

pellethead wrote:
Alhaurinrhino wrote:
People should live within their means, a lot of this is chickens coming home to roost now that the government is cutting back (quite rightly) on the amount of handout they give away.
People need to learn that top of the range smart phones, Sky TV contracts, designer clothing, and alcohol are not necessities, but things that are to be earned if you want them.
How about the person who has worked , earning a good wage and has taken responsible decisions to borrow. This person then loses his job and can no longer afford the repayments. I say bring back debtors jails to punish those people who cant pay their debts. In fact why don't we bring back the stocks or reintroduce the Poor Law
To lose a job is not instant.

There would be months of speculation before that happened. Why would anyone take a loan out if they were in that situation?

If you know you might be employed within 6 months to a year, why borrow money (when the chance of it being paid back is pretty minimal)?
[quote][p][bold]pellethead[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Alhaurinrhino[/bold] wrote: People should live within their means, a lot of this is chickens coming home to roost now that the government is cutting back (quite rightly) on the amount of handout they give away. People need to learn that top of the range smart phones, Sky TV contracts, designer clothing, and alcohol are not necessities, but things that are to be earned if you want them.[/p][/quote]How about the person who has worked , earning a good wage and has taken responsible decisions to borrow. This person then loses his job and can no longer afford the repayments. I say bring back debtors jails to punish those people who cant pay their debts. In fact why don't we bring back the stocks or reintroduce the Poor Law[/p][/quote]To lose a job is not instant. There would be months of speculation before that happened. Why would anyone take a loan out if they were in that situation? If you know you might be employed within 6 months to a year, why borrow money (when the chance of it being paid back is pretty minimal)? The Hoffster
  • Score: 2

9:47pm Wed 22 Jan 14

The Hoffster says...

* - The word 'employed' in that last post should read *un-employed".

(why you can't edit your posts on this site is pretty p*ss poor)
* - The word 'employed' in that last post should read *un-employed". (why you can't edit your posts on this site is pretty p*ss poor) The Hoffster
  • Score: 0

10:52pm Wed 22 Jan 14

spottedsnake says...

Doorstep selling of any kind should be completely illegal in this country, so that elderly people cannot be bullied into buying anything or taking out loans on the doorstep. Also should apply to TV licencing, elderly people have been bullied into buying a TV licence which they did not need to buy. Unsolicited telephone sales calls should also be illegal.
Doorstep selling of any kind should be completely illegal in this country, so that elderly people cannot be bullied into buying anything or taking out loans on the doorstep. Also should apply to TV licencing, elderly people have been bullied into buying a TV licence which they did not need to buy. Unsolicited telephone sales calls should also be illegal. spottedsnake
  • Score: 2

12:43pm Thu 23 Jan 14

RollandSmoke says...

When I was at school I was taught economics. It was the first time my school had taught the subject and it was a valuable lesson to learn although it wasn't taught to everyone and I had to give up religious education in order to do it (no loss there). There are challenges however in teaching the subject without a political bias. I would suggest that Michael Gove put more focus on this subject being taught as it is much more valuable to the kids than the Latin that he's trying to get the schools to teach. Sadly however it seems that there is a lot of money to be made out of keeping much the population financially illiterate and gullible.
When I was at school I was taught economics. It was the first time my school had taught the subject and it was a valuable lesson to learn although it wasn't taught to everyone and I had to give up religious education in order to do it (no loss there). There are challenges however in teaching the subject without a political bias. I would suggest that Michael Gove put more focus on this subject being taught as it is much more valuable to the kids than the Latin that he's trying to get the schools to teach. Sadly however it seems that there is a lot of money to be made out of keeping much the population financially illiterate and gullible. RollandSmoke
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree